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Win 7 FROM 32 to 64 bit





kminek5
How can i change the computer from windows 7 32 to 64 bit?
Hammy
You will need to buy Windows 7 64bit and do a fresh install

You cannot do an upgrade from 32 to 64.

However your best to wait untill windows 8 is offcially launched now.
lightwate
He's right, you can't upgrade your current 32 bit OS to a 64 bit one. You'll have to reformat your partition and install a fresh copy.

Also, you'll need to have a special cpu that can run 64 bit OS. (Most CPUs in sale today can run 64bit) If you're in doubt, check using cpu-z
Fire Boar
Hammy wrote:
However your best to wait untill windows 8 is offcially launched now.


Not necessarily. For all we know, Windows 8 might be another Vista catastrophe.
deanhills
Fire Boar wrote:
Hammy wrote:
However your best to wait untill windows 8 is offcially launched now.


Not necessarily. For all we know, Windows 8 might be another Vista catastrophe.
Excellent point. I'm still readying myself for Windows 7 and by all looks it seems to be great OS. I'll be using mine at home for personal use. In everyone's opinion, which version of Windows 7 should one get? What is the difference between 32 and 64 bit, and why would one be needing 64 bit?
Fire Boar
deanhills wrote:
Excellent point. I'm still readying myself for Windows 7 and by all looks it seems to be great OS. I'll be using mine at home for personal use. In everyone's opinion, which version of Windows 7 should one get? What is the difference between 32 and 64 bit, and why would one be needing 64 bit?


In my experience, they all function pretty much identically, except for the cheapest one (Home Starter edition IIRC) which has had tons of essential functionality such as "ability to change desktop wallpaper" taken out. Such a con.

The difference between 32-bit and 64-bit is that 64-bit has two program files folders: "Program Files" and "Program Files (x86)". The latter contains most of your programs, because nobody compiles stuff for 64-bit, still. Also something about having more than 4 gigabytes of total memory (RAM plus whatever's on your video card) available on 64-bit.
Radar
Yeah. The extra memory is what pushed me over from 32 to 64 bit.
Marcuzzo
@kminek5: do you have a 64 bit Processor on your MoBo?
If not... it will not do you any good.
if you do have one.... why is there a 32 bit OS installed on it...?
Like the others said, you need to reinstall the lot.
mukesh
kminek5 wrote:
How can i change the computer from windows 7 32 to 64 bit?


You have to buy windows 7 x64 and then after install in computer.
But you can save both operating system (32 and 64) in one Hard disk.
weableandbob
I don't see any real reason to upgrade from 32 bit to 64 bit unless you have access to a 64 bit key already. The two main advantages you get from 64 bit are the ability to use more than 4 gigabytes of RAM and access to 64 bit programs, which generally run a bit faster. Unless you have more than 4 gigs, I don't see any need to upgrade, as the difference between 64 and 32 bit programs isn't all that noticeable, at least not for me.
menino
If you have a core 2 DUO, then it can handle 64 bit as well.
If you have 2gb ram, then 32 bit is fine, as I've not seen much speed gain with 64 bit, even with 64 bit applications (mainly talking about office 64 bit version)
If you have more than 3gb, then you can backup your data and reinstall 64 bit and hopefully appreciate the speed gain.
ricardinhu
Install only tha version 64 Bit of Seven have 4 giga of memory ??
therimalaya
It is better to use 32 bit, if it is not necessary to use 64 bit, i'm not feeling any difference in them... May be for graphic user, the difference is seen..
anthonythangaraj
first you have to check that whether your process 64bit OS or not. This can be found by googling the internet by putting your processor name or by checking your BIOS.

Then you need to have the disc of 64 bit OS. Normally retail version of windows will have both 64 bit & 32 version of Operating system.

Then you need to take back up of data. Cause 64bit OS cannot be upgraded over 32 bit OS.So you need to do a clean install of Windows.
anthonythangaraj
therimalaya wrote:
It is better to use 32 bit, if it is not necessary to use 64 bit, i'm not feeling any difference in them... May be for graphic user, the difference is seen..



There will not be any difference between 32 bit OS & 64 bit except the Memory support. 32 Bit OS will support 4 GB[max]of Memory and whereas 64 bit OS support of more than 4 GB of RAM.

If you are using less than 4 GB then go for 32bit OS. Else stick to 64 bit OS.
brandon02852
I wouldn't suggest upgrading to Windows 8 as it was designed as a tablet OS. Get 7x64.
SpitsBeaT
To clarify the part about 32bit v 64bit, let's picture each bit as the diameter of a pipe.
Logically, a larger diameter (in other words a larger pipe) allows greater volume of particles to pass through them. For this case, 64bit would be the "larger pipe", it means that theoretically a 64bit system would be better at handling larger chunks of data more efficiently.

That explains the ability to handle more than 4gb of RAM.

But realistically, the differences are minor unless you're working on rocket-science projects on your PC.

To my understanding, most computers out there are still on the 32bit system, that explains why most developers are reluctant to develop software specialised on 64bit systems; there are only few programs out there made for the 64bit (usually audio/visual/graphics rendering/editing software).

So like many have suggested here, if you're not using more than 4gb of RAM for your PC, or if you're not into high-end production work which requires a lot of memory, there's no much need for a 64bit system. 32bit is cheaper anyways Laughing
menino
When I first tried windows 7 64 bit in the office, it was ok, until I installed all the software, such as office and stuff, and it becaem slow... quite irritatingly slow.
It took a couple of re-installs, and right now, it works quite fast.
It was probably freeing up disk space, as I had 4gb disk space free, and after the last OS install, and cleanup, I have over 20gb free... so I guess free disk space also counts.

Still I think 64 bit is the way things will be in future, i.e. untill 128 bit apps come out... Smile
sanalskumar
Fire Boar wrote:
deanhills wrote:
Excellent point. I'm still readying myself for Windows 7 and by all looks it seems to be great OS. I'll be using mine at home for personal use. In everyone's opinion, which version of Windows 7 should one get? What is the difference between 32 and 64 bit, and why would one be needing 64 bit?


In my experience, they all function pretty much identically, except for the cheapest one (Home Starter edition IIRC) which has had tons of essential functionality such as "ability to change desktop wallpaper" taken out. Such a con.

The difference between 32-bit and 64-bit is that 64-bit has two program files folders: "Program Files" and "Program Files (x86)". The latter contains most of your programs, because nobody compiles stuff for 64-bit, still. Also something about having more than 4 gigabytes of total memory (RAM plus whatever's on your video card) available on 64-bit.


The difference between 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, is the way they handle the memory(RAM). A 64-bit processor can handle larger address spaces on the physical memory. Also, it can handle larger chunks of data at a given point of time; means programs will run faster and more accurately.

Now considering the case of 32-bit system; it can support a maximum of 4 GB of RAM theoretically (2.6 to 3.4 GB depending upon the hardware used but there are still debates on this). The support for 4 GB of memory is fair enough for most of the applications. But the applications which has to address more memory for its operations, will definitely need a 64-bit version of it on a 64-bit platform(CPU and OS), for a smoother experience, in simple terms.

I have been using 64-bit hardware and 64-bit fedora for quite sometime, because my job demands me to run a number of VMs in my machine. So will get support for all the available RAM in my hardware.

A detailed and friendly explanation of the differences between 32-bit and 64-bit systems, is mentioned on this link. http://www.techsupportalert.com/content/32-bit-and-64-bit-explained.htm

So, the reason, why we do not see many 64-bit applications around, is simply because there is not much need for them...
bukaida
Since not many applications are written till date on 64 bit(specially Games) , it is better to stick to 32 bit only for compatibility issue. However it is wise to keep the hardware 64 bit as it can run both 32 and 64 bit. We usually do not upgrade hardware frequently, right?
SonLight
@bukaida, when this thread was begun two years ago, I would agree that it made sense for most users to stick with a 32 bit OS, as it was early in the life of 64-bit software. Today, my recommendation would depend upon the user's need for forward and backward compatibility. The 64-bit processors are the standard now, so most would never need to worry about having an older computer that will not run a 64-bit OS. If you run Linux, a 32-bit OS can utilize as much memory as you are likely to provide it with through the PAE feature. It cannot give more than 2 or 3 gb to any one program however. With Windows and a new computer, I would think most people will want to have 4 gb of memory or more, or will likely want to add memory later, so almost any upgrade of a 64-bit compatible computer would justify a 64-bit OS.

With Linux, if you want a stable workhorse machine you might want to stick with a 32-bit OS; but if you are looking to the future it is high time to get 64 bits. There are definitely compatibility issues with 32 bit programs on both Windows and Linux on a 64-bit OS although there aren't supposed to be. In another couple of years, the necessity to get a special 32-bit version of a program is likely to be a greater nuisance though.
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