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iTunes or Physical copies?





newberie
Do u guys buy music from iTunes or still hanging out in the music store to buy physical cd?

i found it convenient buying on iTunes but it doesn't have the same feeling like physical ones,do u guys feel the same?
Petee
If I'm buying a new album, I typically just buy it through iTunes. As you said, it's very convenient. Takes about the same time for me to download an album as it would to rip it from a CD, so the main advantage is I don't have to travel to the store, or wait for it to arrive in the mail. Plus I don't have stacks of CD's cluttering my desk. Razz

One of the things I've really come to like about iTunes (or any modern digital music store really) is that you can pick and choose the songs you want. You don't have to buy the entire album (usually). That's a big plus for me.
rocking
If i am buying - only physical copies,
buying for itunes It just not the same. You don't have the amazing feeling that you feel when you are holding a physical copy....
Ankhanu
I never buy digital-only media. If I buy an album, it's gonna be physical, or be a download with a physical copy coming in the mail.
If I buy physical-only, I just rip to mp3 myself.

I see no real point in digital only purchase.
liljp617
Ankhanu wrote:
I never buy digital-only media. If I buy an album, it's gonna be physical, or be a download with a physical copy coming in the mail.
If I buy physical-only, I just rip to mp3 myself.

I see no real point in digital only purchase.


Cheaper, get it immediately, listen to songs beforehand and don't buy the ones you don't want (in a period where quality concept albums are pretty nonexistent throughout many genres, this is helpful). Preference really. I personally couldn't care less about random album art and I'd rather pay $8 than $12 for basically the same end product.
Ankhanu
I've found through the years that it's the tracks that you don't know that end up being the best on the album... even, in some cases, the tracks you initially didn't like at all.

There's value in actually holding the album in your hand, seeing the album art, reading the liner notes... in some cases seeing the case choices that the artist made (ie. standard jewel case, paper sleeve, bi-, tri-, quad- fold sleeves, etc.) can really enhance the overall product...
I don't really think they're the same end product, either, if for no other reason than the greater difficulty in losing physical media rather than digital. I've lost a few HDDs over the years, and many mp3s along with them (including recordings of my own bands that weren't anywhere else), it's not as bad now, with how cheap external media devices are, but, backing up dozens of Gb of media used to be a slow, painful process. 24 DVDs later, and all that jazz Wink
I'd much rather pay $12 for a physical entity than $8 for something as ephemeral as digital media, especially when the digital media are so easily created from the physical.

I also tend to buy my CDs directly from artists when they come through my town, or buy from artist-centric sites, like zunior.com, which keep the profits and product control in the hands of the artists themselves. I buy very, very few major label discs, and when I do, they're generally second hand Razz

In terms of instant gratification, there's nothing like handing a bill directly over to the artist and having them hand back an album. No wait there whatsoever Wink
liljp617
To each his own Razz Nothing wrong with either method, as some people receive different satisfaction from different purchases. I typically buy the whole album when I buy digital, but I can see why some people don't -- most people aren't "musicophiles."

I understand the threat of losing the data, but that's hardly a problem these days and it's getting to be even less of a problem. With easily obtainable, huge amounts of HD space and some services offering online backups every time you digitally buy an album (Amazon for example), it's pretty difficult to completely lose your music. I don't think it's really any more a threat than scratching or losing the CD.

They're not exactly the same end product, but they're close enough to me, because I buy music to listen to the music...plain and simple. I don't buy music to see the album art or hold the CD. It's just not appealing to me. So, for me, they're largely the same end product, because the I find the music is the same.

Apart from that, I prefer to spend less on albums and more on band merchandise/concerts as more money goes to the artists that way.
c'tair
I try to get real albums. If I can't due to some reasons, I get the music and make at least two backups of it.
mazito
i love the tangible, but i have Mp3 of all my cd`s in fact i dont have a cd player anymore, just my pc with a good speaker system
tingkagol
iTunes is probably the most annoying media interface/player I've ever come across. Sucks that I have to use it because I own an iPod.
alvarorojas4
I preffer Digital music...
I don't like a lot the Physical albums...
standready
Myself, I like being able to hold an album and read the insert. Then if I want it on my mp3 player, I do it.
All of you that use digital only, I hope you have your music backed up and secure from EM pulses!
liljp617
standready wrote:
Myself, I like being able to hold an album and read the insert. Then if I want it on my mp3 player, I do it.
All of you that use digital only, I hope you have your music backed up and secure from EM pulses!


I have all my music backed up in three places -- two hard drives and an online storage service. It's not like CD's are invulnerable. House fires and natural disasters do happen after all. As do children and pets if you catch my drift. You're at risk of losing your "data" as well. I don't really see the danger of losing the data as an advantage of either choice. I don't see much difference in the levels of risk if you take reasonable actions to back up your digital media...and there's really no excuse not to do this as it can be done in just a few minutes for pretty cheap these days.
Radar
If I like, or expect I will like, an album, I will go physical copy. However, this is tempered by the fact that most physical CDs I own get imported to my computer and are never touched again.

When I buy complete digital albums, it tends to be because I've bought one track, then another, until the point at which it's cheaper to complete the album on iTunes than any alternative.
gverutes
i find itunes music format to be extremely annoying. i understand they are trying to prevent privacy, but if i want to burn itunes music onto my non-apple music device -- i have to convert it.
Hello_World
I like to buy albums. Like others have said, I often find that I like many of the songs I didn't previously know, often better than the song I buy it for.

It is fairly rare that I buy an album from a shop anymore, although I do occasionally.

I try to buy the album of any act I see live, and these are often not for sale in the shops/iTunes anyway, I buy it at the venue.

It means more than to download a song in digital, and you get to love more songs from that artist.
menino
Digital music would be good if it has the original format it was originally recorded in, or mastered in.
Physical music usually has this set on the cd or dvd, but the digital equivalent may not always be there, since it gets ripped to a standard format, and might not have all the features that was initially set into it.
I'm not sure how itunes get their music, as I've not used it.

I personally use digital downloaded music, but mainly I "take" them from my friend who downloads them.
I have another friend who buys only the physical original stuff, as he loves to play it on his sound system, and we all enjoy it, when we hang out together.
Zuex
Ankhanu wrote:
I never buy digital-only media. If I buy an album, it's gonna be physical, or be a download with a physical copy coming in the mail.
If I buy physical-only, I just rip to mp3 myself.

I see no real point in digital only purchase.


Although someone listed the advantages of digital purchases, I still prefer the physical copy too. It just feels more "real" in a sense. In the future most things will just be only digitally available so we'll have no choice, but it's all a transition I guess.
ExMachina
Digital only...easier to manage with my devices since I don't have to rip the music to my computer. Also, I generally tend to only like 1 or 2 songs from an album, so its cheaper to just download the songs I like instead of the whole album. For most other things (movies or video games for example) I prefer to have a physical copy.
mazito
tingkagol wrote:
iTunes is probably the most annoying media interface/player I've ever come across. Sucks that I have to use it because I own an iPod.


i have an ipod nano and and i unistall the ipod tunes, i use winamp to load music to the device
Josso
I usually buy 12" vinyl and flac
drunkenkoz
With our technology getting more advanced as each day goes on, physical things are becoming a thing of the past. Sooner or later physical copies of music, such as CDs, will be a thing of the past. Everyone will start purchasing their music digitally.
Josso
drunkenkoz wrote:
With our technology getting more advanced as each day goes on, physical things are becoming a thing of the past. Sooner or later physical copies of music, such as CDs, will be a thing of the past. Everyone will start purchasing their music digitally.


Apart from the fact that physical copies can provide more content such as actual physical artwork, DJing virtually is lame as well... you can't really feel the mix so to speak. Even with the digital decks I still don't think that anything beats some good old technics for scratching and mixing. Look at the vinyl industry for example, it's still going - but its way past it's sell by date... you kind of have to look at why that is, also vinyl sleeves are great to put on your wall! Sometimes CDs and vinyls come with posters as well. It's kind of like saying ok will everyone buy games off steam or some other marketplace in the future... well no, if you've got a big paper map and some cool models or something that's definitely worth the price.
Blummer
You know, I'm from a generation of physical copy fans. However I love listening digitized music, only if it concerns tasting new releases. I always try to obtain the cd's, since I really love more natural sound. Though I'd really buy an lp player and obtain my fav albums to hear more natural sound.
Ankhanu
Blummer wrote:
You know, I'm from a generation of physical copy fans. However I love listening digitized music, only if it concerns tasting new releases. I always try to obtain the cd's, since I really love more natural sound. Though I'd really buy an lp player and obtain my fav albums to hear more natural sound.

CDs are a digital medium, they offer no more of a "natural" sound than any other digital medium (e.g. mp3s). The only difference between a CD recording and an mp3 is file compression; CDs contain .wav files, mp3s are compressed .wav file (usually).

As for LPs being "natural"... I'm not really sure that audible friction and surface irregularities make the music "natural"... In fact, I know that they don't. Vinyl does have character, certainly, but it's not "natural" by any stretch.

Any recording will not represent the "natural" sound; there are limitations inherent in microphones, and audio processing and conversion that will never quite catch e natural sound of a performance. That said, modern digital recording is the best we have to capture sound as we would hear it. The classic analogue methods all introduce their own artifacts into the final product... Usually making thingsnsound warmer, brighter, more brittle... A good old-school recording technician could eve identify what brand of tape something had been recorded to based on the sound characters it enhanced or attenuated. While these sorts of things are interesting, they're really not the natural sound.
Blummer
Ankhanu, I understand what you mean. I should've expressed myself better - I only wanted to say, I love the clearer sound of LPs...and don't understand a generation of those who listen music on youtube (not HQ). Razz
gverutes
YES! LP's sound way better. I was actually just listening to tapes and forgot how bad they are. I guess portability became paramount to quality. People in the early 80s wanted to transport their music in walkmans!
User_X
I have to admit I haven't bought "new" music since the early 90's. I've gotten some old school stuff from garage sales here & there. 99% of the time I listen to the MP3. I used to be an audiophile in the late 80's - early 90's but since stopped ruining my ears as I had to bass out hard if I had the system.

Back on track...
When I bought music it was a group I knew. Many of the songs I just skipped over & was a waste to me. The way I do it now is look for unsecured Apache like servers that someone has loads of music on. I'll go down the list & pick what songs or artists I know. And/or If a title catches my eye I'll open that up in a new tab (Firefox) & let it sit there not playing it yet. I use QuickTime lite for the player in the browser & shut off auto-play. Then when I have a lot of tabs open I'll find whatever website I'm on that day & play the songs one by one. If I like it or it has a good beat then I'll download it.
The thing I like about going to numerous websites is that I never know what I'll find. About 70 - 80% of the music I listen to now was not known to me before. IE, the Black Eyed Peas. I never knew who they were till I listened to their songs & immediately started looking for them. Richard Marx I never new who the heck he was. Now I love the song "Hazard". The list goes on & on.

An iPod. No way but have thought about it for the trueness (sp) & tone. Just can't imagine the hassle of converting but as someone said above they use Winamp now
rsbw
I also prefer to buy from iTunes, but if I want to hear it then they're in the car I buy a CD
Blummer
Why does iTunes only give you 256 kbps file? 320 kbps is the minimum quality that is satisfying.
TheGremlyn
I like iTunes for managing my music and helping me organize it, having it all there in front of me. As for buying music, they only have so many artists, not everyone is on there. Some music people might like might not be there, which is kind of lame. An online store like that that can sell to anyone around the world should have practically everyone on there, but the artists have to want to have their stuff up on iTunes.

Partially because I did work with Apple before in one of their call centres (shoots self in head) I don't like iTune Store. People who sometimes buy off them are not made fully away of how to manage that music in the future, and how to back things up. So many people would call in about how they lost their music and its never on the computer, and they didn't back anything up. People even assume that iTunes would have a record of everything they bought and they can just redownload it for free. Well, iTunes isn't that smart. While they do keep a record of your purchases, they won't let you download it again. Probably because they don't want people giving out their music by authorizing other computers with their account (a max of 5 so it's not that big of a deal). iTunes should be more like Steam. You buy it once then you should be able to get it on your computer for the rest of your life. There are cases where because have been given a regrant of their purchases but some older songs they got from iTunes store are no longer on their servers so the customer can't get those back. Completely lame. If you're going to sell it on your store you should keep it until you've been run into the ground by another company.

I wouldn't say I hate iTunes Store... but they could do better. They could improve the way they operate.

Buying a physical copy is okay. I mean if you store them properly you can have those for years. You can get those on your computer easily enough and you can choose the quality. It just sucks if you only like a couple songs on the CD and you have to buy the entire thing. I've run into that there I thought the artist really only had one good song on a CD and I had to choose between getting the entire CD or not getting it at all.... or finding someone who already had the CD.
ratanegra
I download everything. I have only bought a classical music album and was given a Metallica's 'Death Magnetic' album physically as a birthday present.



Yeah, that doesn't favour the bands, but I just don't feel like wasting money on something that is free. I would buy albums from my favorite band (Empyrium), and I would even donate if I found that they are in need, but they are cool and are now touring, so it's OK, and they deleted some songs I uploaded to Youtube, so now they'll have to pay the price, YARR, unless I find a copy of their albums physically (I'd buy it instantaneously). I wouldn't buy digital music. I find that annoying and illogical. I'd only pay for the physical. If I want it digital, I'll download it. As simple as that.
_AVG_
I've recently started buying iTunes songs and I must say its quite convenient since you don't need to store CDs and face the problems of CDs going bad. Nevertheless, for my favorite bands, I'd like to own real physical stuff especially if it's a pcial edition or something
welshsteve
I like to own the CD/record.
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