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Online Interfaith Calendar





watersoul
As a lot of religious folk appear to have a blanket respect for many other faiths, I thought it would be useful to share this handy Interfaith Calendar so you never need to miss a festival again.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/tools/calendar/

There's absolutely loads on this month, from Pagan, Christian and Muslim, to Hindu, Zoroastrian and Rastafari - take your pick and enjoy Smile

I still can't understand why anyone with a strong faith in one religion could 'celebrate' the faith of another though. Surely if a Christian (for example) totally believed their own teachings, they would disregard the beliefs of all others because they indicate that their own faith is incorrect? They can't all be true can they?

Another confusing bit for me is this apparent mutual back slapping between opposing faiths, yet when it comes to people who lack belief, a large element of the same religious folk condemn these godless atheists.

Is it ok to believe in a different god/s but not ok if you believe in none? Curious paradox to me.

Whatever, I hope you enjoy the handy calendar, there should be something to celebrate nearly every day now.
Bikerman
This actually cuts to the heart of a basic problem with most faith. In my experience, many people with a particular faith reserve most of their anger for those without faith - not those of opposing beliefs.
I suppose you could liken it to sport. To draw an analogy:
The Christians would be Manchester United fans and the Muslims would be Arsenal Fans. The atheist takes the position that the very idea of paying people millions to kick a ball is stupid. He/she further points out that the whole game is a human construct - there is nothing 'inherent' about the rules of football - we create the rules ourselves.
The Arsenal and United fans will chant bile at each other during the match, but many of them (apart from the 'fundamentalists') will happily talk the game over afterwards with the opposing fans. When the atheist walks into the pub, however, they have a 'common enemy' - someone who calls into question the whole basis of football, rather than accepting the paradigm and selecting within it.
Navigator
I find this useful in the business world where you might want to check if a client or supplier will be available on certain dates.
Hello_World
Bikerman I LOOOOVE that analogy!

Note these dates are not valid the world over. Spring Equinox cannot be in March in the Southern Hemisphere.

Nevertheless, it is a useful link Smile

Quote:
Surely if a Christian (for example) totally believed their own teachings, they would disregard the beliefs of all others because they indicate that their own faith is incorrect?


I agree with your point, second Bikerman's, and add that Christians have been using Pagan symbols such as egg and rabbit, tree and so on with no problem historically.
Ankhanu
Hello_World wrote:
Note these dates are not valid the world over. Spring Equinox cannot be in March in the Southern Hemisphere.


Good point, but, only the name changes to the appropriate season; the equinoxes and solstices are determined by properties of our orbit and not subject to our whims/change... Spring equinox in the North is the autumnal equinox in the south; winter solstice in the North is the summer solstice in the South. Something to be aware of for sure.
deanhills
watersoul wrote:
I still can't understand why anyone with a strong faith in one religion could 'celebrate' the faith of another though. Surely if a Christian (for example) totally believed their own teachings, they would disregard the beliefs of all others because they indicate that their own faith is incorrect? They can't all be true can they?

Another confusing bit for me is this apparent mutual back slapping between opposing faiths, yet when it comes to people who lack belief, a large element of the same religious folk condemn these godless atheists.

Is it ok to believe in a different god/s but not ok if you believe in none? Curious paradox to me.

Whatever, I hope you enjoy the handy calendar, there should be something to celebrate nearly every day now.
To be truthful Watersoul, I don't see much difference in your judgment above to those you are accusing of condemning atheists. People are people. They do strange things all of the time. Some like to look at Faith Calendars. Others don't. I never knew there was a Calendar like that. And where I am I don't see people hanging those against their walls either. And if they did, that would not worry me either.
watersoul
deanhills wrote:
watersoul wrote:
I still can't understand why anyone with a strong faith in one religion could 'celebrate' the faith of another though. Surely if a Christian (for example) totally believed their own teachings, they would disregard the beliefs of all others because they indicate that their own faith is incorrect? They can't all be true can they?

Another confusing bit for me is this apparent mutual back slapping between opposing faiths, yet when it comes to people who lack belief, a large element of the same religious folk condemn these godless atheists.

Is it ok to believe in a different god/s but not ok if you believe in none? Curious paradox to me.

Whatever, I hope you enjoy the handy calendar, there should be something to celebrate nearly every day now.
To be truthful Watersoul, I don't see much difference in your judgment above to those you are accusing of condemning atheists. People are people. They do strange things all of the time. Some like to look at Faith Calendars. Others don't. I never knew there was a Calendar like that. And where I am I don't see people hanging those against their walls either. And if they did, that would not worry me either.


Judgement? I would describe my post as observational, with a question which still hasn't been answered properly by any theists here yet.
If person A absolutely believes that their religious texts or gods are the only truth, then by default, they must also believe that person B who believes in a different god is wrong.
I don't understand how anyone with a strong faith can respect anothers any more than believing in the tooth fairy - if your faith is right then everyone else must be wrong, or your own faith is not absolute in your mind.

The calendar itself doesn't worry me either, but it certainly shows that there are many opposing belief systems in the world, so some (or all) must be just a load of brainwashing rubbish because they could not all be true at the same time.
To that end, I am still puzzled how religious folk can 'respect' differing faiths yet condemn folk with no faith? Rolling Eyes
deanhills
watersoul wrote:
Judgement? I would describe my post as observational, with a question which still hasn't been answered properly by any theists here yet.
I was unaware that your OP post was asking a question off theists, more like a rhetorical type of observation. If I may ask, who have you been observing?

With regard to theists differing with other theists in what they believe, I'd imagine there must also be atheists who differ from other atheists in their opinions. What is the point exactly? People differ all the time. You get fundamentalist type atheists who are on a mission to cure society of religion, and you get fundamentalist type Christians who are on a mission to cure the world of atheists. People are people. Some are tolerant of other people's faith or opinions, others are not.
watersoul
deanhills wrote:
I was unaware that your OP post was asking a question off theists, more like a rhetorical type of observation.

Urm...this question:
watersoul wrote:
Is it ok to believe in a different god/s but not ok if you believe in none? Curious paradox to me.

Of course people think differently about many things, but they either believe in one religion and god/s, are unsure about any of it, or don't believe at all.
If a person has a particular religious or spiritual faith then they cannot have any more respect for another conflicting belief than, say my atheist stance which considers all of them fairytales. Or can they?
deanhills
watersoul wrote:
deanhills wrote:
I was unaware that your OP post was asking a question off theists, more like a rhetorical type of observation.

Urm...this question:
watersoul wrote:
Is it ok to believe in a different god/s but not ok if you believe in none? Curious paradox to me.

Of course people think differently about many things, but they either believe in one religion and god/s, are unsure about any of it, or don't believe at all.
If a person has a particular religious or spiritual faith then they cannot have any more respect for another conflicting belief than, say my atheist stance which considers all of them fairytales. Or can they?
I guess that pretty much depends on individuals, whether they have faith or not. Why go for religion only? Because as far as I see this is not something that is limited to religion. If an atheist has a particular opinion about religion being hogwash and detrimental to mankind, then does he by implication have less respect for those who are religious? As for me that is pretty much the same thing.
watersoul
deanhills wrote:
If an atheist has a particular opinion about religion being hogwash and detrimental to mankind, then does he by implication have less respect for those who are religious? As for me that is pretty much the same thing.

I can only answer from my own perspective, I respect the right for anyone to believe whatever outlandish idea they may care to if it harms no-one else. I do not respect their belief itself though, why would I if I think its hogwash?
deanhills
watersoul wrote:
deanhills wrote:
If an atheist has a particular opinion about religion being hogwash and detrimental to mankind, then does he by implication have less respect for those who are religious? As for me that is pretty much the same thing.

I can only answer from my own perspective, I respect the right for anyone to believe whatever outlandish idea they may care to if it harms no-one else. I do not respect their belief itself though, why would I if I think its hogwash?
Great, then you have just answered your own question. If an individual happens to be religious, and he/she doesn't agree with another religion, it would be up to their own perspective how they would deal with this difference. Where I am (not necessarily representative of anything except where I am) Muslims have a respect for Christians as Muslims here are more focused on what the two have in common than what the differences are. Travel to certain parts of Saudi and Yemen as an opposite example, perspectives would obviously be radically different.
watersoul
deanhills wrote:
Where I am (not necessarily representative of anything except where I am) Muslims have a respect for Christians as Muslims here are more focused on what the two have in common than what the differences are.

Still puzzled how anyone who considers their texts as the absolute true word of their god can ever sideline the differences between religions? Either their particular 'gods word' is absolutely right and the other guys belief is simply wrong, or their god didn't get it right at all?
Hello_World
Quote:
I can only answer from my own perspective, I respect the right for anyone to believe whatever outlandish idea they may care to if it harms no-one else. I do not respect their belief itself though, why would I if I think its hogwash?


I second that Very Happy
Bikerman
The notion that Christians and Muslims have significant theology in common is rather strange.
At the core of Christianity is the belief that Jesus was Divine. Take that away and Christianity has no real point or meaning. Islam absolutely rejects this. The notion that this is just one difference in a sea of otherwise compatible beliefs is simply daft - it is the WHOLE POINT of Christianity that Islam rejects (and, of course, vica-versa).
watersoul
Bikerman wrote:
The notion that Christians and Muslims have significant theology in common is rather strange.
At the core of Christianity is the belief that Jesus was Divine. Take that away and Christianity has no real point or meaning. Islam absolutely rejects this.

Good point, major point which I'd considered myself at length before starting the OP.
Maybe I won't ever get a considered answer from anyone drawn to a particular religious strand either way though? It really does appear to be a paradox.

Just look on the bright side , it's Oct 13th and there's loads going on today:
Quote:
St Edward's Day (Christian )

Edward the Confessor was King of England 1042 - 1066.
He built Westminster Abbey where there is a shrine to him - and where the saint is also celebrated on January 5 each year, the anniversary of his death.

Sukkot (Jewish )

Sukkot or The Feast of Tabernacles, commemorates the years that the Jews spent in the desert on their way to the Promised Land, and celebrates the way in which God took special care of them under impossible conditions. Sukkot lasts for seven days, and work is not permitted on the first two days.


Thank you BBC for your online calendar, no matter how conflicting any of the religions may be, I can 'respect' all of their unsubstantiated historical festivals now Cool
loremar
Well, at least people have reason to celebrate, feast, and eat no matter how outrageous their beliefs are. I usually get annoyed by people's devotion to the patron saints their having feast to especially when I can imagine them going to church and kiss on the saint's statue's foot. It's just so crazy. But I'm happy to see people happy. That's what I find nice about feasts and holidays. The devotion part, not nice. I just think of it as celebrating something that is nonsense just for the sake of having fun.
Like for example:
Person A: Yay, its @#%R@#%@#%'s day!!!
Person B: Yay!!!....Wait who? Oh Nevermind.
deanhills
watersoul wrote:
Thank you BBC for your online calendar, no matter how conflicting any of the religions may be, I can 'respect' all of their unsubstantiated historical festivals now Cool
For someone who is not into faith or religion, must say you seem to be obsessively preoccupied with both to the extent of studying religious calendars? Is this a cry for help?
watersoul
deanhills wrote:
watersoul wrote:
Thank you BBC for your online calendar, no matter how conflicting any of the religions may be, I can 'respect' all of their unsubstantiated historical festivals now Cool
For someone who is not into faith or religion, must say you seem to be obsessively preoccupied with both to the extent of studying religious calendars? Is this a cry for help?

Lol, I sort of assumed most folk would have easily realised it, but just to clarify I'll add [/sarcasm] Rolling Eyes
boinsterman
That is a good website. The calendar is also part of a much larger site at http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/ which is definitely worth exploring.
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