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extern harddsik





GoFool
I want a extern hard disk for backupping my files. Is this a good idea???
Or are there better ideas?
Donutey
having an external hard drive is only an advantage if something bad might happen to the computer ( hdd is separate ) however if you are just backing up documents a CD-RW or DVD-RW or GMAL FS are better ( longer lasting etc... average hdd keeps data intact for three years )
fredy
A good choise is a use a disk image tool with compesion of data and write the image to a CD-Rs or DVD-R, some applications for this is Norton Ghost, R-Drive Image, SelfImage, etc
mark
If your files are too large, an external hard disk is a good idea. But if you just want to backup your important files which you use everyday and are too precious, you can back them up on a dual layer DVD.

Also, if you just want to backup four or five files, you can try a flash drive.
Reyntjensw
it's also a good idea to take a ethernet hd if you work with more then one pc, you can acces the drive from every pc on your network! it's really good stuff Very Happy


grtz
budazz
my advice is use some flash disk drive..very easy to use, handy you can use it anywhere...

extern hardrive is also good..for back ups Very Happy
brosta
You could set up a RAID 1 where you have two images so if one HDD fails, you wont be screwed.

Quote:
RAID 1

A RAID 1 creates an exact copy (or mirror) of a set of data on two or more disks. This is useful for set-ups where redundancy is more important than using all the disks' maximum storage capacity. The array can only be as big as the smallest member disk, however. An ideal RAID 1 set contains two disks, which increases reliability by a factor of two over a single disk, but it is possible to have many more than two copies. Since each member can be addressed independently if the other fails, reliability is a linear multiple of the number of members. To truly get the full redundancy benefits of RAID 1, independent disk controllers are recommended, one for each disk. Some refer to this practice as splitting or duplexing.

When reading both disks can be accessed independently. Like RAID 0 the average seek time is reduced by half when randomly reading but because each disk has the exact same data the requested sectors can always be split evenly between the disks and the seek time remains low. The transfer rate would also be doubled. For three disks the seek time would be a third and the transfer rate would be tripled. The only limit is how many disks can be connected to the controller and its maximum transfer speed. Most IDE RAID 1 cards use a broken implementation and only read from one disk so their read performance is that of a single disk. Some older RAID 1 implementations would read both disks simultaneously and compare the data to catch errors. The error detection and correction on modern disks makes this no longer necessary. When writing, the array acts like a single disk as all writes must be written to all disks.

RAID1 has many administrative advantages. For instance, in some 365*24 environments, it is possible to "Split the Mirror": declare one disk as inactive, do a backup of that disk, and then "rebuild" the mirror. This procedure is less critical in the presence of the "snapshot" feature of some filesystems, in which some space is reserved for changes, presenting a static point-in-time view of the filesystem. Alternatively, a set of disks can be kept in much the same way as traditional backup tapes are.


source - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redundant_array_of_independent_disks
dandollinger
I would personally get an internal one because they are cheaper, but some poeple(like my mom Surprised ) are afraid of their computer case being opened in any way whatsoever, so somebody like her would be willing to spend the extra money to buy an external drive. They do have advantages of portability, but they do get in the way sometimes. You laso don't want to bang them around that much. If it was dropped hard enough (say it fell off a computer desk) while writing to its disk, it may damage the disk if the read/write head hit the disc inside.
So the choice is up to you. I am all for getting an internal drive. I use a 1gig flash drive for file portability.
thinkping
using 2 external 3,5" harddisks (160GB/200GB) for external storage and backups, for small transport of files I use my 2GB Corsair Stick and for bigger file transfer I use my external 80GB 2,5" Harddisk.

I'm still thinking buying a networkstorage, the only one that sounds good and meets my needs is the Buffalo Linkstation, the 2 USB-Ports could hold my printers for the network, and the central memory is very useable for shared files on more computers and for automated backingup

Contra: for backupping is the 100MBit a little bit slow when you compare with USB2.0

CD/DVD is only interesting for me with smaller contents that don't change so much.

The question what to use is how much files you have, I have 1,3TB, from this there are appox 0,35TB backups.

I'm still searching for better and changeable backuppossibilities, as magentic bands I don't trust
SunburnedCactus
I bought a 250Gb USB 2.0 LaCie HD for only 95 and it works a treat!
NuniPio
external hardrives seem ok, i have a small 2.5" USB 2.0 6GB laptop hardrive. i use it to transfer files between me and my mates and it seems to be doing the job with ease Very Happy
smallcalf
Have you ever think about backing up your files online? I have several gmail account and a software that allow me to copy and paste my files to the gmail account as if it is a network folder. However, that program has a problem, the re's a limit for the file name and the size (<10 MB). Buying an external HD or flash drive is costly but uploading files is free!!!
SoftStag
smallcalf wrote:
Have you ever think about backing up your files online? I have several gmail account and a software that allow me to copy and paste my files to the gmail account as if it is a network folder. However, that program has a problem, the re's a limit for the file name and the size (<10 MB). Buying an external HD or flash drive is costly but uploading files is free!!!

Hey that sounds good. Where can I get this software from?
Aelita
Well i have a 200GB external HD. Its quite useful for me. I'm an anime freak. So I can save my favorite shows on there. Also my complete collecton of music is on there. And I also have any files I download such as clients for video games and other downloads I want to save saved on that drive. I still have like 100 gigs left on it. and using files like those run seamlessly even. (2.0USB) So if these are the types of files you are talking about. Yes a external HD is a pretty good choice. But if you have the room and the money an Internal one would be better cuz you can store other things on it and get more usage out of it.
Helios
The best choice imo(if you have that large data which you want to backup) is to buy a cheap and little internal HD(20 gigs~).

You plug it in, move the desired data from the main HD to the internal and remove it(or unplug it and leave it inside the case.. or use it as an additional space resource). Just like the external HD but cheaper.

An external HD would be a good choice if you're afraid of the guts of your case or if you want to transfer your data to a friend's HD and your friend is afraid to open the case =\
Or if you're rich and you don't have anything else to spend money on =P

I would go on another internal HD Rolling Eyes
gonzo
If realtime backups are important I, too, vote raid
SoftStag
gonzo wrote:
If realtime backups are important I, too, vote raid

Of course RAID is the best option for realtime backup, however, it is not always the right option. RAID is an expensive option, it requires either a specific hardware or software solution, as well as permenant redundant disk space for the backup. It also does not allow the flexability of external devices, for example you cannot easily move the disk to a new PC to access the data by simply plugging it in. Real time backup is also not always sufficient, if you have important data, you need to do regular timed backups - delete a file from a RAID array and the file is gone, no backup!

External hard drives have become much cheaper and are a good flexible solution for backups. Personally, I think they are a good option.

Making the right choice depends upon individual requirements. For some people a CDRW, or pen drive will suffice. Very Happy
mwm
SoftStag wrote:
gonzo wrote:
If realtime backups are important I, too, vote raid

Of course RAID is the best option for realtime backup, however, it is not always the right option. RAID is an expensive option, it requires either a specific hardware or software solution, as well as permenant redundant disk space for the backup. It also does not allow the flexability of external devices, for example you cannot easily move the disk to a new PC to access the data by simply plugging it in. Real time backup is also not always sufficient, if you have important data, you need to do regular timed backups - delete a file from a RAID array and the file is gone, no backup!

External hard drives have become much cheaper and are a good flexible solution for backups. Personally, I think they are a good option.

Making the right choice depends upon individual requirements. For some people a CDRW, or pen drive will suffice. Very Happy


This a good point. This thread wanders between redunancy and backup. These are two very different things. For redunancy I have 2 200gb HDD's mirrored using a hardware RAID card. This allows me to not worry so much about a disk failure. The chances of both disks failing at the same time are remote. For backup I use DVD. I have a scheduled burn of data I simply cannot afford to use. I actually burn it twice and store one at my moms house just in case. Works great for me.
scarecrow
Another option is a removable drive or drives. this allows the seamless use of large files and the removalble drives can be stored off-site. this is more of an industrial strength plan than a home-user plan. however the falling prices and availablity of mass storage means that nearly anyone can do this at home. obviously the advantages of a removable drive also extend to upgradeability. if the storage capacity becomes insufficient then the drive can simply be upgraded. Laughing
ocalhoun
using linux, you can set up RAID without any hardware your PC dosen't allready have, except an extra internal hard drive.
That way you can have software-level RAID!
gnomme
GoFool wrote:
I want a extern hard disk for backupping my files. Is this a good idea???
Or are there better ideas?


buy another internal! its more cheaper and faster!!!
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