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Layering clothing





Nameless
When most people's clothing wears out, they buy new clothing. When poor and/or cheap people's clothing wears out, we layer clothing! Right now it's a cold morning and I'm wearing 4 layers: an old dressing gown over an old jumper over an originally thin jumper over a very old jumper. I feel like a frumpy tank. Razz

What's the highest number of layers of clothing that you've worn at once?
standready
Nameless wrote:
What's the highest number of layers of clothing that you've worn at once?

Three while working outside in winter.
deanhills
Ditto Standready - three - but because of winter. I particularly remember South Africa where houses are built for summer with plenty of ventilation and no insulation, with no indoor heating, so for at least a month in the middle of winter one would literally almost freeze indoors. I'd also wear the same layers outside but with a coat on. So that could technically make it four layers when I'm outdoors. I still wear my oldest clothes because I get attached to them. I'd basically wear them to tatters before I let them go.
Very Happy
Ankhanu
I rarely layer up.
That's not to say I'm not fairly poor, or that I buy new clothes all the time (I'm still wearing shirts that I bought in 1998; my winter coat i bought in 1996 or 1997), I just don't tend to layer. Under normal circumstances, I wear pants and a t-shirt (undies and socks too, of course), and if it's cold, I might add a flannel shirt of a hoodie... maybe a jacket (a coat in winter). That's usually sufficient to keep me warm in my Atlantic Canadian climate.
deanhills
I don't think there is any need to layer in Canada as during winter it is probably even more hot inside offices than it is during summer. When I was living in Calgary all I needed was one layer of clothing and a very thick coat, boots, gloves and a scarf. But living in winter in the southern hemisphere is a completely different kettle of fish. It is very rare that you find offices that have internal heating. You may find the odd bar heater somewhere but even with those, you do need to layer up.
Radar
I've been doing this with socks lately - mostly because it's simpler than actually throwing out the ones with holes in them.
Bikerman
Nameless wrote:
When most people's clothing wears out, they buy new clothing. When poor and/or cheap people's clothing wears out, we layer clothing! Right now it's a cold morning and I'm wearing 4 layers: an old dressing gown over an old jumper over an originally thin jumper over a very old jumper. I feel like a frumpy tank. Razz

What's the highest number of layers of clothing that you've worn at once?
I routinely wear 4 layers in winter (as all sensible bikers do).
a) Thermal underwear.
b) T-shirt and jeans
c) electrically-heated waistcoat
d) Leather soft-armoured jacket (normal) or kevlar hard-armoured racing jacket (if feeling a bit frisky). Over-trousers if wet, Leather gloves.
deanhills
Bikerman wrote:
c) electrically-heated waistcoat
Is it electrically heating while you wear it, and how does it do it? Batteries? I'm totally intrigued as I've never heard of one before.
Very Happy
Bikerman
It has a wire element that runs through it (stitched into the fabric). The element terminates in a male connector (in this case a 5-pin DIN socket) which is plugged into the female counterpart on the bike itself (the DIN connector is used because it easily detaches in the event of you forgetting to unplug yourself, or in the event of an accident). Between the connector and the waistcoat is a short length of cable with a variable resistor - this is the heat controller, so you can turn the amount of juice up or down depending on how warm you want it.

I have been a biker for 30 years and usually it is a choice between a bike or a car, so I have to ride the bike in the winter as well as the summer. Over the years I have tried just about everything to keep my hands warm. In a typical winter with the thermometer at zero centigrade, the wind-chill factor can take that down to -20 or less. Gloves (even state of the art gloves with exotic materials) are good for about 10-15 minutes. After that your hands become so cold it is painful - and I freely admit to having actually cried with the pain on more than one occasion. Heated gloves were an option I tried. They are not bad and certainly take the 'edge' off. The beauty of the heated waistcoat/vest is that it keeps the body core temperature high, so your hands never get cold - even with normal gloves.

My new bike, Brad (a Yam FJR 1300 which I love - in the platonic sense) came with after-market heated grips. These are OK for mildly cold weather, but when it gets really cold they end to toast the palms whilst the back of your hands get really cold.

I am not in the habit of recommending commercial products on this site, but I would say to any cold bikers reading this - get yourself a vest, you will thank me for it.

The vest I have is a Gerbing - but there are others on the market, and you should check out the competition using Google before committing.
Helios
I support the concept of wearing many layers of clothes because you can always add or remove an item on the go. In this case it's also helpful to carry a bag with you, something I also support very much... I always carry a bag with me with some first aid stuff, water and maybe other things I might need during the day (extra clothing?).

Generally speaking, In Israel it's very useful to wear multiple layers if you live in the southern part of the country where it can be pretty hot during the day and cold during the night.

However, I live in the central part of the country, therefore I usually wear one or two layers.
Three at most in cold winter days. All of the layers are very thin... at most: an under-shirt, some thin long-sleeved shirt and a leather coat in "very cold" days.

I do remember once wearing 4 layers:
An under-shirt < a long-sleeved t-shirt < a sweater < a coat. That with 3 layers of pants, 4 socks, a scarf and a hat Razz
Around -25*C in Russia can be harsh for an Israeli Sad
deanhills
Helios wrote:
Around -25*C in Russia can be harsh for an Israeli Sad
Which part of Russia was that ..... or is that a State secret ....
poper
actually i didn't wear too much .in general ,i wear a tmart t-shirt inside (because i am addicted to tmart t-shirt ,you know ,beautiful design so i have many t-shirt)and add a coat outside because in our city it's not too cold even in winter.two clothes is enough.
deanhills
poper wrote:
actually i didn't wear too much .in general ,i wear a tmart t-shirt inside (because i am addicted to tmart t-shirt ,you know ,beautiful design so i have many t-shirt)and add a coat outside because in our city it's not too cold even in winter.two clothes is enough.
Which city is that?
Very Happy
Hello_World
I wear multi-layers when I go camping, or at least I did before I had a decent sleeping bag.
watersoul
My max was 3 pairs of trousers and about 7 or 8 T-shirts/jumpers (plus coat) over my torso, when I was a homeless 16 year old during a cold winter many years ago. Even off the ground and inside a sleeping bag with a hat on I was still shivering (Brr!)

[/unpleasant memory]

We can only do what we have to, at the times we're forced to do it, or as a close friend of mine from the countryside says, 'You can only farm the land you've got'. Smile
socials
I used 5 coats once, it was really cold!! I personally don't like winter weather, is so cold.
shivaghimire
I am from Himalayan country, Nepal, and lives in its capital Kathmandu. Its not cold here, its summer season here but mostly our country remains in moderate temperature so we are lucky. Its quite cold in the month of December and January but a shirt with a jacket or a coat is enough to be safe from cold. I was talking about Kathmandu climate but in northern part of the country is quite cold as there are lots of mountains including the highest peak of the world, Mount Everest. We have 10 peaks among 12 highest peaks of the world. Again in southern parts of our country its plain land and mostly it remains hot. So, being a small country, 147181 sq. km. we have different climatic situations.
I am not needed to wear not more than layers of clothes which include thin 3 clothes like shirt, T-shirts and a jacket.
wellerchap
In winter here in the UK, I ride the scooter to work still (45 minute journey)...the coldest I've ridden in is -13 a couple of winters ago.
I'd have 2 pairs of socks & walking boots on, thermal leggings, jeans, tshirt, jumper, fleece, a large padded all-in-one snow suit, a cotton balaclava under my crash helmet and 2 pairs of thick gloves.
Took a long time to get it all on and off !
speeDemon
I think the maximum would be in winters, when I'd wear a blazer over a sweater over school shirt, over thermal inners, over a vest..
deanhills
speeDemon wrote:
I think the maximum would be in winters, when I'd wear a blazer over a sweater over school shirt, over thermal inners, over a vest..
I guess you have to get up earlier in the morning to put all of that on ..... 5 layers .... I think that must be a winner so far.
Laughing
Helios
deanhills wrote:
Helios wrote:
Around -25*C in Russia can be harsh for an Israeli Sad
Which part of Russia was that ..... or is that a State secret ....


A really cold Moscow winter day Smile
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