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Beet juice to the rescue





Voodoocat
Beet juice can substantially lower your blood pressure. All it takes is 500 milliliters of beet juice each day, and the effects last up to 24 hours. Beets are naturally high in nitrates. Saliva and bacterial action on the tongue convert nitrate to nitrite. Once swallowed, the acidic environment of the stomach converts the nitrite to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide causes the blood vessels to relax thus lowering blood pressure.

I wonder if the cure is worth it? I am going to try it and see what beet juice tastes like Shocked

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080205123825.htm
ocalhoun
Source link won't load for me, is it broken?

Without being able to look at what kind of study found this result, I'm left to assume it is likely just more nutritionist garbage.
Ankhanu
ocalhoun wrote:
Source link won't load for me, is it broken?

Loads for me:
sciencedaily.com wrote:
Daily Glass Of Beet Juice Can Beat High Blood Pressure, Study Shows

ScienceDaily (Feb. 6, 2008) Researchers at Barts and The London School of Medicine have discovered that drinking just 500ml of beetroot juice a day can significantly reduce blood pressure. The study could have major implications for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

Lead by Professor Amrita Ahluwalia of the William Harvey Research Institute at Barts and The London School of Medicine, and Professor Ben Benjamin of Peninsula Medical School, the research reveals that it is the ingestion of dietary nitrate contained within beetroot juice - and similarly in green, leafy vegetables - which results ultimately in decreased blood pressure. Previously the protective effects of vegetable-rich diets had been attributed to their antioxidant vitamin content.

Professor Ahluwalia and her team found that in healthy volunteers blood pressure was reduced within just 1 hour of ingesting beetroot juice, with a peak drop occurring 3-4 hours after ingestion. Some degree of reduction continued to be observed until up to 24 hours after ingestion. Researchers showed that the decrease in blood pressure was due to the chemical formation of nitrite from the dietary nitrate in the juice.

The nitrate in the juice is converted in saliva, by bacteria on the tongue, into nitrite. This nitrite-containing saliva is swallowed, and in the acidic environment of the stomach is either converted into nitric oxide or re-enters the circulation as nitrite. The peak time of reduction in blood pressure correlated with the appearance and peak levels of nitrite in the circulation, an effect that was absent in a second group of volunteers who refrained from swallowing their saliva during, and for 3 hours following, beetroot ingestion.

More than 25 per cent of the world's adult population are hypertensive, and it has been estimated that this figure will increase to 29 per cent by 2025. In addition, hypertension causes around 50 per cent of coronary heart disease, and approximately 75 per cent of strokes. In demonstrating that nitrate is likely to underlie the cardio-protective effect of a vegetable-rich diet, the research of Professor Ahluwalia and her colleagues highlights the potential of a natural, low cost approach for the treatment of cardiovascular disease -- a condition that kills over 110,000 people in England every year.

Professor Ahluwalia said: " Our research suggests that drinking beetroot juice, or consuming other nitrate-rich vegetables, might be a simple way to maintain a healthy cardiovascular system, and might also be an additional approach that one could take in the modern day battle against rising blood pressure'.

The paper, 'Acute blood pressure lowering, vasoprotective and anti-platelet properties of dietary nitrate via bioconversion to nitrite', is published online in the March 2008 edition of Hypertension.
Ankhanu
ocalhoun wrote:
Without being able to look at what kind of study found this result, I'm left to assume it is likely just more nutritionist garbage.


It feels off to me... some of my misgivings may be relieved by the paper itself and the details of the test... but I dunno Razz The closest I could find was a response by Ahluwalia and team to criticisms, published in Hypertension. Unfortunately, only the first 250 words are available, and, though my university has a subscription to the journal, the publisher restricts electronic access to the most recent 12 months of articles. Here's the first 250 Razz http://hyper.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/extract/57/2/e3
ocalhoun
Ankhanu wrote:

sciencedaily.com wrote:

Professor Ahluwalia and her team found that in healthy volunteers blood pressure was reduced within just 1 hour of ingesting beetroot juice, with a peak drop occurring 3-4 hours after ingestion. Some degree of reduction continued to be observed until up to 24 hours after ingestion. Researchers showed that the decrease in blood pressure was due to the chemical formation of nitrite from the dietary nitrate in the juice.


Okay, looks legitimate enough, though it may be going a bit far to assume that it will continue do to so over a long term period... The body may become habituated to it and it may lose its effect over time. No reason to assume that would happen either though, just an unknown.

Sorry, I've been wading through a lot of nutritionist garbage lately, and this did seem to fit the pattern of finding some obscure food, then making an unsubstantiated or exaggerated claim that this food has medical benefits. (often accompanied by offers to sell this food, or supplements containing the miracle ingredient within it)
Ankhanu
Yeah, I hear ya.
Part of what gets my attention is the importance of saliva and mouth bacteria in the process. Most of the juice would be consumed without real exposure to them (there would be some extra saliva mixing in the stomach, I suppose), and the time required for enzymes to catalyze nitrite into nitrate in any substantial degree is rather longer than the couple seconds the juice may remain in the mouth... add in the time required for bacteria to take the nitrite into their bodies to begin processing and you're looking at much the same consideration (exposure processing time lag).

This is part of why I want to see the published paper on the study to look at the methods and explanations. I'm not an expert, or very well versed, in biochemistry and bodily processes, so I need a little help from the methodology and such to help me see the picture Razz
menino
I guess beet juice has its benefits, as per the study, but another food that does the same thing, is oats.... or oat meal for that matter.
Oats also lowers blood pressure, for that matter, apart from whole wheats and other foods.

I rarely get a chance to eat beets, much less drink its juice, and I rarely notice it in the supermarkets, but oatmeal is sold in bulk, and is quite noticeable, and I would guess cheap, and easily storable.
I doubt that the canned dry oats have preservatives in it though.
Voodoocat
The key is the creation of nitric oxide which is a well known vasodilator:

http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~molbio/nitric.html

L-arginine also has a vasodilation effect due to its conversion to nitric oxide. This is called the l-arginine-NO system: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitric_oxide_synthase

L-arginine + 3/2 NADPH + H+ + 2 O2 = citrulline + nitric oxide + 3/2 NADP+

(The 3/2 proves that a biologist, not a chemist, balanced this equation Very Happy )
Bikerman
I may be wrong, but I think this is also the main active ingredient in Viagra.....(nitric oxide, not beet juice). Obviously a vaso-dilator would increase blood flow to the required part Smile
ocalhoun
Hm... been thinking about it...

Wouldn't whole beets work better than beet juice, since it will be in the mouth longer as you chew it, and therefore more of it will mix with saliva?
Ankhanu
Perhaps, though the nitrites would be less concentrated due to the fibre content. Chances are the time exposure would offset the dilution, though.
deanhills
Voodoocat wrote:
Beet juice can substantially lower your blood pressure. All it takes is 500 milliliters of beet juice each day, and the effects last up to 24 hours. Beets are naturally high in nitrates. Saliva and bacterial action on the tongue convert nitrate to nitrite. Once swallowed, the acidic environment of the stomach converts the nitrite to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide causes the blood vessels to relax thus lowering blood pressure.

I wonder if the cure is worth it? I am going to try it and see what beet juice tastes like Shocked

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080205123825.htm
Beet juice is very potent. I'm almost certain if one would have that amount of beet juice that it would go straight through you. Probably better to mix it in with other vegetable juices like cucumber, carrot, ginger and a squirt of lemon juice. Make it into a cocktail of sorts.
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
Beet juice is very potent. I'm almost certain if one would have that amount of beet juice that it would go straight through you. Probably better to mix it in with other vegetable juices like cucumber, carrot, ginger and a squirt of lemon juice. Make it into a cocktail of sorts.

^.^
Or, just do what (legitimate) nutrition experts have been saying for decades: eat your veggies.
gverutes
Does it turn your pee purple?
bukaida
Beet is restricted for diabetic patients (As it contain some form of sugar elements). As blood pressure and blood sugar often comes together, so the person taking it, should be careful.
back_to_grandma
It does turn your pee and poo into some very interesting colors. Not only does beet juice lower blood pressure, but it can also increase our physical endurance and stamina. The only down side is that the juice is kinda laborious to get and extremely expensive to buy as a stand alone product from a health store.
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