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Cow Versus Horse "Leaping" .... Hilarious!





deanhills
When a farm girl in Germany wanted a horse, and her parents said no, she decided to focus on Luna, her cow, for doing the equivalent horse jumping manouvres. She started to train Luna at calf stage, and has been almost inseparable from Luna for the last two years with excellent results. Quite hilarious to view, but just goes to show, everything is possible if one believes in it:


Link to Article in Associated Press
IceCreamTruck
deanhills wrote:
Quite hilarious


Quite!

Has anyone explained to her where beef comes from, and what her parents plan to do with Luna?

Her parents are mean:
1. They tortured her by keeping a cow, but not a horse.
2. A good riding horse that isn't overly beautiful can be had for not that much more than a cow, and you've already got the fences apparently and stalls.
3. They let her spend a lot of time with the cow that she could have spent working to afford a horse, but no one explained that part either.
4. How long did they watch her sit on the back of a cow, and try to jump a fence before it worked?
5. She's not going to live this down, and it provides an angle for her peers to exploit and make fun of her especially if they all own horses. Who's she riding with that she talks about?
6. Horses are afraid of her cow because they don't want to be in the news seen with a COW!
7. They gave permission for the story to make the news... did they ask for money to buy the girl a horse, no! they didn't.
8. She's got a saddle on the cow. Did they buy her that for her birthday? so, so mean.
9. Make no mistake she's attached and won't take them eating the animal well one day when it happens. I see only heartbreak in her past, and heartbreak and tears in her future all because her parents are ignorant people.
10. Not in the news coverage supporting their daughter
11. etc.
12. etc.
13. etc. (I could keep going forever ... the defense rests)

It's my hope that somehow she can make enough money to run away and buy a horse. Ugh, I hate parents and the idea of having kids at the same time for fear that I would do this to them accidentally. Something about having kids causes parents to all of a sudden go totally nutz, and start thinking that they are right all the time when before they had kids they question themselves just like everyone should.

We're not watching the video because we wanted to learn something about cows -- it's funny/ironic/hilarious! She's a side show at best thanks to her parents, which all of this is their fault because they are too lazy to get off the couch and see what their daughter is doing outside with the cow! Smile

Only consolation: the meat will be tough because of all the exercise. enjoy chewing, jerks!
deanhills
IceCreamTruck wrote:
It's my hope that somehow she can make enough money to run away and buy a horse. Ugh, I hate parents and the idea of having kids at the same time for fear that I would do this to them accidentally. Something about having kids causes parents to all of a sudden go totally nutz, and start thinking that they are right all the time when before they had kids they question themselves just like everyone should.

We're not watching the video because we wanted to learn something about cows -- it's funny/ironic/hilarious! She's a side show at best thanks to her parents, which all of this is their fault because they are too lazy to get off the couch and see what their daughter is doing outside with the cow! Smile

Only consolation: the meat will be tough because of all the exercise. enjoy chewing, jerks!
Uhumm .... think you missed the point that the kid and Luna are now soulmates, so there is a bond here that cannot be easily broken. The parents will be in real trouble if they should do anything to Luna that the girl does not like, and now the odds are in her favour as she has the media on her side as well. Having the media on her side also means she has a story to tell.

Personally I have not seen a cow like Luna before. There is something really special and magical about this one. Have you ever had a face to face encounter with a cow, i.e. looked them squarely into those large liquid eyes while they are chewing from left to right and right to left. I don't think I have ever felt as insignificant as when a cow has measured me up. This one however is completely different. Pure brilliance lurking there. This cow has it made. Very Happy
IceCreamTruck
deanhills wrote:
I don't think I have ever felt as insignificant as when a cow has measured me up. This one however is completely different. Pure brilliance lurking there. This cow has it made. Very Happy


Too true, and you made me laugh because of it. I was thinking of my own experience standing in a field with cows all around me... you feel pretty small because they are herd animals, and when the one next to you jumps they all jump, and it's scary when they run away because they follow the herd you can get run over pretty easy. You never really feel how big the animal is until it barely bumps you and almost knocks you over. It's only when faced with the possibility of being on the ground underneath one that you realize that their weight is their biggest weapon.

I love cows, and llamas, camels, and alpacas as I find these animals to have a very comical nature. No one runs a story about a girl riding a horse, but a girl riding a cow... heck, yes that's funny!

I've also been around some bulls that were trained to be mean rides, and it doesn't even feel safe to have only a couple pieces of wood between you and them. They almost dare you to come inside with them, and you can see the hate in their eyes. You didn't even need to wear red to get some of their attention in a bad way -- some always see "red."

Yes, I would say that it would be fun to hang out with luna. Because of the interaction with the girl the cow acts almost like a pet dog. A really big pet dog.

They are German, unfortunately. I lived in Germany for a while, so I feel I can safely say that the "german way" is to not give the child's feelings much merit. I'm not saying German's can't be sympathetic, but typically children are seen and not heard. Dogs are allowed in more restaurants in Germany than kids are, and that's a fact. If the parents bought the cow to eat, which they most likely did, then the cow will be eaten. If the girl feels bad, then the parents are most likely use it as a learning tool of where to invest your emotions. I see that happening a million times to one over the girl keeping the cow as a pet. It's possible the media could sway a decision like that but only if the cow and girl achieve a social status or are employed together on a kids show or something. It will take nothing short of a miracle to save that cow... the girl and the media aren't really enough. It would take the community going against the parents who own the cow to change their reason for having the cow.

This way the girl can be a little more emotionally withdrawn which is the "German way." She really has to move out to make her own decisions as German's tend to maintain status quo on deciding things for the kids even after they are 18 unless it's a family tradition to bestow respect as an 18th birthday present, which will still fall in the "family traditions" category which is very important to German's.

Charlotte's web, and stories like this, moreover, keeping the animal as a pet for being unique is the American way. That animal is not in the US, so I fear it's future is bleak. We respond more to media influence too... remember the last time German's responded to Media influence on a mass scale didn't work out well for them.

PS. 5.5.5 which I believe is radio speak for "OK, heading out" in US military terms is also my post number here! Smile Not to be confused with 5x5 (or 5 by 5) which means "loud and clear"
catscratches
What the heck are you on about, IceCreamTruck? Are you serious? The parents are bad for not buying a horse for their daughter?

IceCreamTruck wrote:

Her parents are mean:
1. They tortured her by keeping a cow, but not a horse.
2. A good riding horse that isn't overly beautiful can be had for not that much more than a cow, and you've already got the fences apparently and stalls.
From what I get from it, they already HAD the cow.

Quote:
3. They let her spend a lot of time with the cow that she could have spent working to afford a horse, but no one explained that part either.
That would be child labour... and really, it appears she's been enjoying her time immensely while at the same time learning to take responsibility. I can't see anything wrong about that.

Quote:
8. She's got a saddle on the cow. Did they buy her that for her birthday? so, so mean.
Why's that mean?

Quote:
9. Make no mistake she's attached and won't take them eating the animal well one day when it happens. I see only heartbreak in her past, and heartbreak and tears in her future all because her parents are ignorant people.
And she'd be equally in tears when they eat her horse. What? They don't have to eat the horse? Then why do they have to eat the cow?

Quote:
10. Not in the news coverage supporting their daughter
Because the parents totally decide what the news wants to show.
standready
I saw that this morning on the news. Gives a whole new meaning to the expression "Ride'm cowboy(girl)!"
At least if you are riding a cow and you get thirsty, milk is only a squeeze away!
IceCreamTruck
catscratches wrote:
What the heck are you on about, IceCreamTruck? Are you serious? The parents are bad for not buying a horse for their daughter?


Yes, this is my opinion: they are evil parents for not getting or telling their girl what it would take to get a horse. Just saying "no" is not good parenting if you ask me. Giving reasons teaches children how to reason even if you are going to keep a close-minded stance.

catscratches wrote:

IceCreamTruck wrote:

Her parents are mean:
1. They tortured her by keeping a cow, but not a horse.
2. A good riding horse that isn't overly beautiful can be had for not that much more than a cow, and you've already got the fences apparently and stalls.
From what I get from it, they already HAD the cow.


Yes, they had the cow. I didn't say they bought it to torture her... keeping one kind of barn animal and refusing another = mean. Especially in light of the idea the girl could have the responsibility of taking care of the horse. If she doesn't do it, or it becomes a problem, then sell the horse because her taking care of it should be in the deal.

catscratches wrote:

IceCreamTruck wrote:
3. They let her spend a lot of time with the cow that she could have spent working to afford a horse, but no one explained that part either.
That would be child labour... and really, it appears she's been enjoying her time immensely while at the same time learning to take responsibility. I can't see anything wrong about that.


I don't remember anything in the story about her waking up at 5am to feed the cow or anything like that. The cow was how she spent her free time. The parents could still shoulder the bulk of the responsibility for taking care of the cow.

Lots of kids do things to make money. In fact, I used to bake bread when I was young and made thousands of dollars, and my sister helped clean the house of the people who gave her a horse, and she helped take care of the other horses in rotation with their children, so I feel you are going overboard with the child labor thing especially since me, my brother, and sister did things all the time to make money, but it was not obligatory, and generally carried a low level of responsibility. You are being decidedly uncreative with the "child labor" comment, and i hope for your sake that you don't have children because you are showing the same lack of creativity these parents are showing -- no offense intended, just turn your imagination back on, please.

catscratches wrote:

IceCreamTruck wrote:
8. She's got a saddle on the cow. Did they buy her that for her birthday? so, so mean.
Why's that mean?


If you asked for a dog for your birthday, but all you were allowed to do is play with a frog down at the pond, and your parents buy you a doggy bowl to feed it in and a leash to take it for walks... you don't see how this is a horrible reminder that you don't, in fact, have a dog?

This is also a horrible contradiction that should not have been allowed, or allowed to persist. Think long and hard about them refusing to buy her a horse, but she obviously got a riding helmet, riding boots, a saddle, and a riding crop from somewhere. it's true someone like her grandparents could have bought these things for her, but that would have given them an honorable mention as being supportive of her cow riding hobby, don't you think?

I didn't mention before, but who's making the horse jumps for her? I still side with the girl... if all this stuff is just laying around, then why not use it, or give her the info she needs to set up her life the way she wants it. You're never too young to start that process if you ask me.

catscratches wrote:

IceCreamTruck wrote:
9. Make no mistake she's attached and won't take them eating the animal well one day when it happens. I see only heartbreak in her past, and heartbreak and tears in her future all because her parents are ignorant people.
And she'd be equally in tears when they eat her horse. What? They don't have to eat the horse? Then why do they have to eat the cow?


You kinda lost me... where does eating a horse come in to the picture? I didn't even make fun of Germans for Leberkäs, which translates "liver cheese", which is primarily horse meat. Yes, Germans eat horses and are kinda proud of it... they definitely don't deny it.

Back to the cow... it is the cow's purpose. To be raised and slaughtered for the family. Lots of Germans raise their own livestock for this purpose, as well as Americans. My best friend has a single cow, and he doesn't intend to milk it.

BTW, that is my assumption, but I feel it's safe: I'm assuming they are going to eat it because it's a meat cow, not a diary cow. It's bread to be eaten.

catscratches wrote:

IceCreamTruck wrote:
10. Not in the news coverage supporting their daughter
Because the parents totally decide what the news wants to show.


I admit... you got me here, and I have no response to this, your best point. I didn't consider the parents were too boring for TV which may very well have happened. Anyway, there were a lot of shots of just the girl, and no parents anywhere in the footage. All I know is that if it was me you would have caught a glimpse of my parents off camera somewhere because they were always so supportive of what I did even more so on game days which is the closest thing to the media dropping by to see my cow that I ever got. It's almost like the parents are completely hands off with her, when someone needs to tell her that she can work for her own horse.

i want you to write back, catscratches, and let me know where I'm opening you up, just like I let you know when you were right on the money and opening up my point of view. It is my opinion that you approached my post with a closed mind, cause after your case I only modified one of my statements in which you showed me a superior open-minded angle (a reason the parents may have been excluded).

I still have 25 reasons the parents are mean! lol... it's only 9 now, thanks to you, but it doesn't change the fact that A. the parents are really mean and B. they are going to eat that cow -- I swear it. They may let it get older than they would have, but it's end will be the same -- barring public intervention, of course. Are you arguing that the girl who couldn't sell them the idea of getting her a horse is going to get them to not kill the cow? She's delayed things, at best, and unless she starts working on her pitch now then Luna is already walking dead meat... literally.
IceCreamTruck
This is already one of my all-time favorite threads. I dunno... good topic, Dean!
ocalhoun
IceCreamTruck wrote:

BTW, that is my assumption, but I feel it's safe: I'm assuming they are going to eat it because it's a meat cow, not a diary cow. It's bread to be eaten.

Somehow, from what I know of the parents so far, I suspect they still intend to eat it, despite how they have an 'unbreakable bond'.


Seconded for, 'get that girl a horse (if she still wants one)'.
IceCreamTruck
ocalhoun wrote:
'unbreakable bond'


That's a hoot! Smile I remember hearing that in the video, but it didn't sink in until now. Let's experiment... lock the girl, and the cow in a room with a large knife and propane grill for 3 months, with all the water they can drink. I give the COW no more than 2 months before little miss is having steak for dinner, and the experiment is over. "Unbreakable" is such a poor choice of words. Try "unique" bond... anything that doesn't deny our basic nature to be a predator. Using flowery or colorful language, or utilizing a verbose vocabulary (mine honestly needs improvement), doesn't make a statement right or true. "unbreakable bond" is a gross exaggeration, and I can't believe I missed it the first time.

ocalhoun wrote:
Seconded for, 'get that girl a horse (if she still wants one)'.


I'm going to put it to the floor that the girl be forced to own a horse. haha! Only then can a choice to continue riding the cow truely be free will.

BTW, I also wanted to add that TV networks should seriously start looking at putting together and televising cow racing and competitive cow jumping. I'd watch, cause it would make me laugh so hard. You'd get more enjoyment out of a longer race... it'd take the cows a year to go a full mile, and there's going to be a better spread and margin on long-shots versus the sure bets. Yes, I'm suggesting gambling on cows could be fun too.

OMG... lol!!!!!! New term: "Racing Cow" ... yes, you heard it here first!
deanhills
IceCreamTruck wrote:
I've also been around some bulls that were trained to be mean rides, and it doesn't even feel safe to have only a couple pieces of wood between you and them. They almost dare you to come inside with them, and you can see the hate in their eyes. You didn't even need to wear red to get some of their attention in a bad way -- some always see "red."
Bulls have had the exact same effect on me. Especially the lone bulls that get separated from everyone else and are sequestered in a separate pen, and are already pissed because of being messed with in that way. Pretty formidable. You're right about them daring a person to share space with them. I've always kept a healthy distance however. But at the same time admire them, as they always seem to be in excellent condition, and the best their species can offer, also the farmer's pride and joy.
IceCreamTruck wrote:
Yes, I would say that it would be fun to hang out with luna. Because of the interaction with the girl the cow acts almost like a pet dog. A really big pet dog.
Right! I don't know about "dog" though. Some dogs would take offense to the comparison with their species. Laughing
IceCreamTruck wrote:
They are German, unfortunately. I lived in Germany for a while, so I feel I can safely say that the "german way" is to not give the child's feelings much merit. I'm not saying German's can't be sympathetic, but typically children are seen and not heard. Dogs are allowed in more restaurants in Germany than kids are, and that's a fact. If the parents bought the cow to eat, which they most likely did, then the cow will be eaten. If the girl feels bad, then the parents are most likely use it as a learning tool of where to invest your emotions.
OK I get it, almost (but not quite the same) as what Hitler had done with the kids in his hey day. There won't have been room for stories like these either.

IceCreamTruck wrote:
Charlotte's web, and stories like this, moreover, keeping the animal as a pet for being unique is the American way. That animal is not in the US, so I fear it's future is bleak. We respond more to media influence too... remember the last time German's responded to Media influence on a mass scale didn't work out well for them.
Right.

IceCreamTruck wrote:
PS. 5.5.5 which I believe is radio speak for "OK, heading out" in US military terms is also my post number here! Smile Not to be confused with 5x5 (or 5 by 5) which means "loud and clear"
Right, and in the meanwhile you're now passing 575 and still counting. Very Happy
IceCreamTruck wrote:
If you asked for a dog for your birthday, but all you were allowed to do is play with a frog down at the pond, and your parents buy you a doggy bowl to feed it in and a leash to take it for walks... you don't see how this is a horrible reminder that you don't, in fact, have a dog?
Tch tch .... well said ICT.

IceCreamTruck wrote:
This is also a horrible contradiction that should not have been allowed, or allowed to persist. Think long and hard about them refusing to buy her a horse, but she obviously got a riding helmet, riding boots, a saddle, and a riding crop from somewhere. it's true someone like her grandparents could have bought these things for her, but that would have given them an honorable mention as being supportive of her cow riding hobby, don't you think?
Completely true. Child abuse right there and then. Shocked Twisted Evil
IceCreamTruck wrote:
Lots of kids do things to make money.
Right, I'm thinking of all the kids whose parents get up with them at 5:00 a.m. in the morning to deliver all the newspapers. Plenty of those.

standready wrote:
I saw that this morning on the news. Gives a whole new meaning to the expression "Ride'm cowboy(girl)!"
At least if you are riding a cow and you get thirsty, milk is only a squeeze away!
Agreed. I particularly liked how absolutely comfy she was sitting/lying on the cow, including hugging the cow horns, and how comfortable the cow was with having her on its back. Cow looks in great shape as well. Very Happy

ocalhoun wrote:
Seconded for, 'get that girl a horse (if she still wants one)'.
I was waiting for that one from you ..... Laughing but thought you would have agreed with ICT point of view that it was tantamount to child abuse, not to let the child have a horse. Very Happy
deanhills
IceCreamTruck wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
'unbreakable bond'


That's a hoot! Smile I remember hearing that in the video, but it didn't sink in until now. Let's experiment... lock the girl, and the cow in a room with a large knife and propane grill for 3 months, with all the water they can drink. I give the COW no more than 2 months before little miss is having steak for dinner, and the experiment is over. "Unbreakable" is such a poor choice of words. Try "unique" bond... anything that doesn't deny our basic nature to be a predator. Using flowery or colorful language, or utilizing a verbose vocabulary (mine honestly needs improvement), doesn't make a statement right or true. "unbreakable bond" is a gross exaggeration, and I can't believe I missed it the first time.
Shocked I don't agree. Children are much MUCH more averse than grown ups are to this sort of thing. My closest experience is when it gets to Ramadan and slaughtering of goats around where I live. As of course parents have to buy the goats first, then the kids get to feed them, and the next day the goat gets slaughtered and the kids going into complete shudder and shock and of course not participating in the meal. I doubt this girl would ever harm her cow. The cow is much more than an animal to her.

IceCreamTruck wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
Seconded for, 'get that girl a horse (if she still wants one)'.


I'm going to put it to the floor that the girl be forced to own a horse. haha! Only then can a choice to continue riding the cow truely be free will.
She will still get to ride the cow, except, as you have previously mentioned, the parents may already have taken care of the cow. They may even have put it as a condition of her owning a horse. I.e. she can't have both.


IceCreamTruck wrote:
BTW, I also wanted to add that TV networks should seriously start looking at putting together and televising cow racing and competitive cow jumping. I'd watch, cause it would make me laugh so hard. You'd get more enjoyment out of a longer race... it'd take the cows a year to go a full mile, and there's going to be a better spread and margin on long-shots versus the sure bets. Yes, I'm suggesting gambling on cows could be fun too.
Agreed. Like the water buffalo in Thailand. When I was in Koh Samui last summer I saw the friendly fights they entered into. Those buffalo get to be coached, trained and treated as though they are Gods, and they look spendid, excellent muscle tone, immaculate condition. And then when they face one another in the fence, all of it just a friendly fight. No blood drawing or heads bashing or biting.
catscratches
IceCreamTruck wrote:

Yes, they had the cow. I didn't say they bought it to torture her... keeping one kind of barn animal and refusing another = mean. Especially in light of the idea the girl could have the responsibility of taking care of the horse. If she doesn't do it, or it becomes a problem, then sell the horse because her taking care of it should be in the deal.
Because you should just buy her whatever the hell she wants, no matter what it might cost? Getting a horse isn't some kind of right every child should have. It's expensive, takes a lot of care and really, I sure as hell wouldn't get any kid of my own a horse just cause she asked for it.

IceCreamTruck wrote:

I don't remember anything in the story about her waking up at 5am to feed the cow or anything like that. The cow was how she spent her free time. The parents could still shoulder the bulk of the responsibility for taking care of the cow.
I didn't say she did. The parent's don't have to just lay all of the responsibility on her for her to still learn to take responsibility and care for it, the same way you would with a horse.

IceCreamTruck wrote:
Lots of kids do things to make money. In fact, I used to bake bread when I was young and made thousands of dollars, and my sister helped clean the house of the people who gave her a horse, and she helped take care of the other horses in rotation with their children, so I feel you are going overboard with the child labor thing especially since me, my brother, and sister did things all the time to make money, but it was not obligatory, and generally carried a low level of responsibility. You are being decidedly uncreative with the "child labor" comment, and i hope for your sake that you don't have children because you are showing the same lack of creativity these parents are showing -- no offense intended, just turn your imagination back on, please.
Yes, I went overboard with that. And don't worry, I won't have kids.

IceCreamTruck wrote:

If you asked for a dog for your birthday, but all you were allowed to do is play with a frog down at the pond, and your parents buy you a doggy bowl to feed it in and a leash to take it for walks... you don't see how this is a horrible reminder that you don't, in fact, have a dog?

This is also a horrible contradiction that should not have been allowed, or allowed to persist. Think long and hard about them refusing to buy her a horse, but she obviously got a riding helmet, riding boots, a saddle, and a riding crop from somewhere. it's true someone like her grandparents could have bought these things for her, but that would have given them an honorable mention as being supportive of her cow riding hobby, don't you think?
Nowhere in the video did it say that they gave it to her as a birthday present. Nowhere in the video does it say that she was given any of it. How about she bought it herself by earning money from baking bread etc.? Now you're the one being uncreative.

IceCreamTruck wrote:
You kinda lost me... where does eating a horse come in to the picture? I didn't even make fun of Germans for Leberkäs, which translates "liver cheese", which is primarily horse meat. Yes, Germans eat horses and are kinda proud of it... they definitely don't deny it.

Back to the cow... it is the cow's purpose. To be raised and slaughtered for the family. Lots of Germans raise their own livestock for this purpose, as well as Americans. My best friend has a single cow, and he doesn't intend to milk it.

BTW, that is my assumption, but I feel it's safe: I'm assuming they are going to eat it because it's a meat cow, not a diary cow. It's bread to be eaten.
So what if that was the cow's original purpose? It's not like you can change your mind about things. You can't know for certain they'll eat it.

It seems like you're making a lot of assumptions that are not supported by the very limited knowledge of the situation we've got. You're jumping to the conclusion that the parents are bad, even though there's nothing in the video to show that.
IceCreamTruck
catscratches wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:

Yes, they had the cow. I didn't say they bought it to torture her... keeping one kind of barn animal and refusing another = mean. Especially in light of the idea the girl could have the responsibility of taking care of the horse. If she doesn't do it, or it becomes a problem, then sell the horse because her taking care of it should be in the deal.
Because you should just buy her whatever the hell she wants, no matter what it might cost? Getting a horse isn't some kind of right every child should have. It's expensive, takes a lot of care and really, I sure as hell wouldn't get any kid of my own a horse just cause she asked for it.


I didn't say they should buy her whatever she wants, but they have a barn, fields, riding equipment. A horse is just about the only expense they have, whereas, I would have to buy a farm, put up fences, build a barn, get riding equipment and a saddle, etc. They have owned horses before I'll wager.

catscratches wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:

I don't remember anything in the story about her waking up at 5am to feed the cow or anything like that. The cow was how she spent her free time. The parents could still shoulder the bulk of the responsibility for taking care of the cow.
I didn't say she did. The parent's don't have to just lay all of the responsibility on her for her to still learn to take responsibility and care for it, the same way you would with a horse.


You are assuming she takes care of the cow, and you did say that, which sparked my comment because it was not mentioned in the video. You didn't say it directly, but this is your comment "while at the same time learning to take responsibility" which assumes she's learning something besides cleaver ways to ride a cow.

She cares for the cow some, because she was making it all pretty for the video by brushing it's hair. Nothing was said about her spending long hours cleaning out stalls, and doing the general labor of barn upkeep.

I suggested taking care of the horse should be her responsibility if she wants one, and it should be part of a deal that her parents strike with her.

catscratches wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:
Lots of kids do things to make money. In fact, I used to bake bread when I was young and made thousands of dollars, and my sister helped clean the house of the people who gave her a horse, and she helped take care of the other horses in rotation with their children, so I feel you are going overboard with the child labor thing especially since me, my brother, and sister did things all the time to make money, but it was not obligatory, and generally carried a low level of responsibility. You are being decidedly uncreative with the "child labor" comment, and i hope for your sake that you don't have children because you are showing the same lack of creativity these parents are showing -- no offense intended, just turn your imagination back on, please.

Yes, I went overboard with that. And don't worry, I won't have kids.


I'm not having kids either.

catscratches wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:

If you asked for a dog for your birthday, but all you were allowed to do is play with a frog down at the pond, and your parents buy you a doggy bowl to feed it in and a leash to take it for walks... you don't see how this is a horrible reminder that you don't, in fact, have a dog?

This is also a horrible contradiction that should not have been allowed, or allowed to persist. Think long and hard about them refusing to buy her a horse, but she obviously got a riding helmet, riding boots, a saddle, and a riding crop from somewhere. it's true someone like her grandparents could have bought these things for her, but that would have given them an honorable mention as being supportive of her cow riding hobby, don't you think?


Nowhere in the video did it say that they gave it to her as a birthday present. Nowhere in the video does it say that she was given any of it. How about she bought it herself by earning money from baking bread etc.? Now you're the one being uncreative.


I asked the question where it's coming from, and thought it's kinda strange that she has boots that fit her, and a riding helmet that fits her. If they bought it for her, then it is a HUGE contradiction of terms, and, if you ask me, a reminder that she doesn't have a horse. If she spent her money on it, then I question the parents allowing her to spend money on a saddle for a cow, which can, by far, cost much more than a horse.

Sure, she seems content to ride the cow now, but this situation does not add up unless all of the equipment was already in the barn ready to be used. Which brings me back around to buying the girl a horse being a fairly easy thing for them to do. Used horse costs about the same as a new bike... it's not a Ferrari.

catscratches wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:
You kinda lost me... where does eating a horse come in to the picture? I didn't even make fun of Germans for Leberkäs, which translates "liver cheese", which is primarily horse meat. Yes, Germans eat horses and are kinda proud of it... they definitely don't deny it.

Back to the cow... it is the cow's purpose. To be raised and slaughtered for the family. Lots of Germans raise their own livestock for this purpose, as well as Americans. My best friend has a single cow, and he doesn't intend to milk it.

BTW, that is my assumption, but I feel it's safe: I'm assuming they are going to eat it because it's a meat cow, not a diary cow. It's bread to be eaten.
So what if that was the cow's original purpose? It's not like you can change your mind about things. You can't know for certain they'll eat it.

It seems like you're making a lot of assumptions that are not supported by the very limited knowledge of the situation we've got. You're jumping to the conclusion that the parents are bad, even though there's nothing in the video to show that.


Yes, I'm jumping to conclusion to add to the comedy of the overall situation, and making a fairly strong case against the parents just for giggles. They weren't in the video, so we can only assume.

It's not a crime to ask the question "why does she have all the riding gear that fits HER, if they won't go ahead and buy her a horse?" I'm just a little perturbed by the contradiction there, and pointed it out.

It's Europe -- I used to live there. You can't just bury an animal of that size when it dies, because I'm pretty sure that would be illegal in Germany. I seem to remember strict rules about burying pets in Germany, but I can't remember exactly cause it's been 13 years. That may also only apply to land within city limits, but I'm not sure. I'm pretty sure they'd get hit with a disposal fee from the state if they allowed the animal to get old and die, so the most logical way to avoid that is to get rid of the cow the way they originally intended. I feel this only delays the inevitable because that animal becomes MUCH more of an expense if it dies because there is no moving an animal of that size by hand once it's dead, or at least you won't move it far.

A much better argument is that the exercise the cow is getting, and the great shape it's in would make the meat pretty tough. Usually cows are encouraged to be lazy because this means the meat will be much more tender when you eat it.

I am a firm believer that parents should help their kids live their dreams, and not the other way around. Parents need to know that they have officially given up their dreams upon having children, and it's the kids turn to live now. I will not bend on this because children who are forced to live their parents ideal soon stop being dreamers and loose their ability to imagine, and seem to suffer from stunted growth and underdevelopment, and they become horrible adults who are always looking for someone to put restrictions and guidelines on them because they didn't learn how to learn and be creative. Parents break kids all the time when it is their responsibility to encourage them to learn to think big, help them grow, and to experience themselves and their abilities fully while they are in development stage... growing up is a time of learning who you are and what you want to be.

Horse riding, especially in Germany, and be a lucrative career for her especially if she starts young. I'm just happy that she's actually going to be really good at riding despite a lack of help from her parents to live her dreams. I'm not saying buy everything a kid wants, because children are whimsical, and need guidance. It's possible horses are a luxury in Germany, and literally raise your tax bracket if you own even one, so there could be factors I'm not seeing that make getting a horse impossible, but riding gear for the cow is more reasonable, or, as I stated, they already have all the riding gear.
deanhills
IceCreamTruck wrote:
I'm not seeing that make getting a horse impossible, but riding gear for the cow is more reasonable, or, as I stated, they already have all the riding gear.
Well definitely, after all of her effort to actually get this cow to do the jumping it is doing, has to illustrate how much she deserves to have a horse. Hopefully if her parents can't afford to give it to her, the article will attract some attention from someone who may recognize this as well. Maybe someone will give her a gift horse. She'd take really good care of it.
IceCreamTruck
deanhills wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:
I'm not seeing that make getting a horse impossible, but riding gear for the cow is more reasonable, or, as I stated, they already have all the riding gear.
Well definitely, after all of her effort to actually get this cow to do the jumping it is doing, has to illustrate how much she deserves to have a horse. Hopefully if her parents can't afford to give it to her, the article will attract some attention from someone who may recognize this as well. Maybe someone will give her a gift horse. She'd take really good care of it.


I was hoping, for her sake, that someone would at least ask her to come ride their horses for pay. Riding the cow is going to come to an end, and I hope that she gets a job teaching horses to jump or something.
deanhills
IceCreamTruck wrote:
I was hoping, for her sake, that someone would at least ask her to come ride their horses for pay. Riding the cow is going to come to an end, and I hope that she gets a job teaching horses to jump or something.
I'm almost convinced that that will happen. She's had plenty of practice as well, has to be much more difficult to ride a cow than a horse for starters. So riding a horse is probably going to be tame by comparison? Twisted Evil
IceCreamTruck
deanhills wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:
I was hoping, for her sake, that someone would at least ask her to come ride their horses for pay. Riding the cow is going to come to an end, and I hope that she gets a job teaching horses to jump or something.
I'm almost convinced that that will happen. She's had plenty of practice as well, has to be much more difficult to ride a cow than a horse for starters. So riding a horse is probably going to be tame by comparison? Twisted Evil


Agreed. Horses can be kinda crazy at times though... I think the cow seems really contented, calm, and responsive to her. It's one of the most domesticated cows I've ever seen. It's almost like the cow wanted to give her a big wet sloppy kiss, and cows are usually much more wary of people touching them, and things having to do with handling them.
ocalhoun
IceCreamTruck wrote:
and cows are usually much more wary of people touching them, and things having to do with handling them.

Probably only because they're never trained to.
Horses are also wary of being handled before they're trained.
IceCreamTruck
ocalhoun wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:
and cows are usually much more wary of people touching them, and things having to do with handling them.

Probably only because they're never trained to.
Horses are also wary of being handled before they're trained.


I completely agree. Complacency when humans are around is a learned behavior, and it goes against their instinct.

I wish humans had instinct, but it's almost evolved out of us completely. This would help the people that seem to have no common sense.
ocalhoun
IceCreamTruck wrote:

I wish humans had instinct, but it's almost evolved out of us completely. This would help the people that seem to have no common sense.

Oh, humans have instincts still... Less than most other animals, but they do.
Watch a teenager try to show off in front of another of the other gender...
Watch a middle-aged lady go 'baby-crazy' and start craving a baby to take care of...
Watch people recoil in fear from a snake*...

These aren't learned behaviors; they're as instinctual as any other animal's behaviors... But it still doesn't mean that these actions are 'common sense' -- they often override people's common sense, actually.



*Possibly a legacy instinct from the time when monkey ancestors were threatened by climbing snakes...
IceCreamTruck
ocalhoun wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:

I wish humans had instinct, but it's almost evolved out of us completely. This would help the people that seem to have no common sense.

Oh, humans have instincts still... Less than most other animals, but they do.
Watch a teenager try to show off in front of another of the other gender...
Watch a middle-aged lady go 'baby-crazy' and start craving a baby to take care of...
Watch people recoil in fear from a snake*...

These aren't learned behaviors; they're as instinctual as any other animal's behaviors... But it still doesn't mean that these actions are 'common sense' -- they often override people's common sense, actually.

*Possibly a legacy instinct from the time when monkey ancestors were threatened by climbing snakes...


Actually I completely agree... I was reading the other day about how disgust for foul or bacteria infested things is instinctual as well, and that "yuck", because it's present in every language of the world, is likely to be the first proto-word ... one of the first things other than "ugh" that we ever said to each other. I imagine "Yum" is also a proto-word.
ocalhoun
IceCreamTruck wrote:
and that "yuck", because it's present in every language of the world, is likely to be the first proto-word ... one of the first things other than "ugh" that we ever said to each other. I imagine "Yum" is also a proto-word.

I'd guess that 'no' is another one... In every language I've ever studied, the word for 'no' has a pretty similar sound.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
IceCreamTruck wrote:
and that "yuck", because it's present in every language of the world, is likely to be the first proto-word ... one of the first things other than "ugh" that we ever said to each other. I imagine "Yum" is also a proto-word.

I'd guess that 'no' is another one... In every language I've ever studied, the word for 'no' has a pretty similar sound.
I guess the most basic one is a very definite left right, right left shake of the head?

PS: I really like your new signature Ocalhoun, is that your own design? And what does it mean? Smile
spinout
I wonder how much you have to whip a cow before it reaches a meter in highjump!

i havn't seen so much on telly these days but the horse riders are customed to have a whip I presume?
deanhills
spinout wrote:
I wonder how much you have to whip a cow before it reaches a meter in highjump!

i havn't seen so much on telly these days but the horse riders are customed to have a whip I presume?
I did not notice the "whip" until you mentioned it. (Shows you how observant I am .... Twisted Evil ). But then with viewing the show again, noticed she was using the "whip" selectively. This time I also noticed Luna has a pierced label in each ear. Very Happy
IceCreamTruck
deanhills wrote:
I guess the most basic one is a very definite left right, right left shake of the head?

PS: I really like your new signature Ocalhoun, is that your own design? And what does it mean? Smile


Yeah, but not every culture shares that. In some cultures left right shaking of the head means "yes!" I'm not joking.

To them shaking your head up and down means, displeasure, or "no" they still know what "yuck" means, however! Smile
speeDemon
IceCreamTruck wrote:
deanhills wrote:
I guess the most basic one is a very definite left right, right left shake of the head?

PS: I really like your new signature Ocalhoun, is that your own design? And what does it mean? Smile


Yeah, but not every culture shares that. In some cultures left right shaking of the head means "yes!" I'm not joking.

To them shaking your head up and down means, displeasure, or "no" they still know what "yuck" means, however! Smile


I'm not sure about the displeasure part, but in some south Indian states, people say yes by nodding their heads left and right. Actually it's not exactly "shaking", it's more like, well.. it's unexplainable, I'm lost for words Razz

And the funny thing is, that they'd do the same for saying no!
IceCreamTruck
speeDemon wrote:
Actually it's not exactly "shaking", it's more like, well.. it's unexplainable, I'm lost for words


It is called "shaking" and if you really shook your head you'd probably die. It's just a movement of the head from left to right and back again that is called "shaking your head - no" in English, that in one culture means "yes" and in your culture means "no" and I was just pointing that out, and you backed my up beautifully. We usually call it "Nodding your head - yes" or "nodding off to sleep" means the up and down movement as someone goes to sleep that does not want to sleep and who is catching themselves.

Hungarians say cziya (pronounced "See Ya!") when you come over, and they say "hallo" when you leave, and that sounds pretty backwards to an English speaker. "Yuck", however, is present there too.
deanhills
speeDemon wrote:
And the funny thing is, that they'd do the same for saying no!
I know what you mean. I have quite a number of colleagues and friends from Kerala in India, but that is not the same as really saying "no". It's sort of a friendly acknowledgment (mimic) of what is being said, and all of the body language is positive.
missdixy
Well this is pretty cool. That girl is a fighter! Haha. I would have never thought to do this with my cow after being denied a horse....and she really did work hard (2 years the video said?).

I am fairly convinced that she'll find a way to get a horse eventually.
ocalhoun
spinout wrote:

i havn't seen so much on telly these days but the horse riders are customed to have a whip I presume?

Many do, especially in competitive sports, but if you see a rider use it for anything more than a light touch, it means they're not a good rider and/or the horse is not well trained.

(The rule would be very much the same as with spurs: if you're a good enough rider to use a whip, then you're a good enough rider to not need to use it.)
spinout
I wonder how much you can add to a living beeing, beeing whipped and gaining some sort of output?

hm, some people get trigged by the drill sergeant in the army to add more effort - some gets trigged to want to shoot the sergeant... like me... Cool

That must work on the cows mind also - some cows jump higher > some cows stop and want to take a shit on the human pest... Laughing
sudipbanerjee
Funny! but is it true or camera work?
IceCreamTruck
Someone did pose a good question. How much do you have to whip a cow to make it jump? I suppose the cow has it's own defenses though, cause honestly, it's not outside the cows ability to put a little fear of god in that little girl. It's a good question though.
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