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Are landline phones dying?






What is your preference, landline or mobile phone?
Landline phone
19%
 19%  [ 5 ]
Mobile phone
46%
 46%  [ 12 ]
Both Landline and Mobile phone
26%
 26%  [ 7 ]
None of the above
7%
 7%  [ 2 ]
Total Votes : 26

deanhills
I'm just wondering who are still using landline phones? I use a landline phone at work, but away from work, all my calls are on my mobile phone. While in Vancouver, Canada, I did not own a mobile phone. I had a landline with a very sophisticated answering machine, and that worked wonderfully. Everyone uses mobile phones where I am in the UAEr, so I had to join the crowd and do as the Romans do. How about you? What is your preference? Landline or mobile phone?
ahnguye5
Still have a landline but it is a victim of frequent telemarketing.
Helios
I don't have a landline, just a cellphone, which I try not to use much.
Landline is wasted money for me; when I had one, I never used it anyway.
Cellphone - well when I do use it, I try to keep it away from my body and use a headset.

I voted "none of the above", since I prefer talking to people in real life, face to face.
watersoul
Mobile for me although I do have a landline.
All my calls incoming and outgoing are through my mobile. The landline is solely for broadband internet, in fact I don't actually know what its number is, or even have a telephone connected to it. Laughing
deanhills
watersoul wrote:
in fact I don't actually know what its number is, or even have a telephone connected to it. Laughing
Same here. If someone should ask me what my land line number is, I would have to think about it. Like Helios, I prefer the face to face situation, even at work. The reason why I have a land line is when one applies for a bank account in the UAE as new residents, the bank wants to see a land line number that they can phone, as some form of checking mechanism. Not all of the banks do that, but for some or other reason having a land line provides greater credibility of proof of your residency. I have a dedicated ADSL line, so technically don't need a land line at all, but am keeping it alive, just in case I need to do a transaction with a Bank where they are going to ask me for my land line number. Very Happy
standready
I have a landline. I use it to make local calls and my DSL. I use Google Voice and Skype for long distance calls.
I also have a prepaid cell phone for when I am out and I need to contact someone.
speeDemon
In India (or at least form the part I come from) every house has a landline phone.
Ankhanu
Personally, I hate phones. Like Helios said, I prefer talking face to face (or online).

That said, last year I got my first cellphone, an iPhone 3Gs, and over the summer I changed carriers and upgraded to an iPhone 4. I absolutely love it. I don't love it as a phone, I hate the phone as much as ever, but it's pretty much the "wrist computer" fantasy I'd had since being a child growing up in the 80s (except that it's a pocket computer rather than wrist mounted).

My wife also has a cell phone, so we've done away with having a land line. It wouldn't be used. Neither of us like to talk on the phone and the cellular phones give us all the flexibility we might need.

Landlines are still very common around here (Atlantic Canada), but increasing coverage and technology quality/capability are making them less and less desirable. The likelihood of someone of my generation or younger having only a cell phone and no land line is definitely on the rise. Why pay for two services where one service duplicates the other with greater restriction?
chatrack
Hi,

land line can not be ignored. We all trust landlines number, than mobile no. You can easy get a mobile no, with in 5 minutes. To get a land line no. it need more steps of verification of address, location
. then go through installation procedures.

Land line is maintained by govt. authorities and more trusty than, any mobile company.

Household People always trust land line than mobile no.
deanhills
chatrack wrote:
Land line is maintained by govt. authorities and more trusty than, any mobile company.

Household People always trust land line than mobile no.
Good point. From a Government point of view they see land lines as a more reliable form of verification, however this is changing in some countries. For example when I was on a visit to South Africa in November last year, the Government had introduced a more stringent measure of application for ownership of SIM cards, where the applicant needs to provide proof of residential address first. This usually takes the form of an up to date original Utilities Bill together with an ID Document. The Utilities Bill is usually verified electronically, as in South Africa there is a checking system with the Income Tax Authorities, Investment Authorities, Banks and Utilities Authorities, that I as a Canadian find quite shocking. They can do cross checks of your accounts. The Banks, who are in effect running the economy in South Africa (as agents of the central Reserve Bank), decided to use mobile phones as a way of verification of banking transactions, and a necessary consequence of that was to tighten up the requirements for application of a SIM Card. It's quite messy now of course, as those in November who already had SIM Cards have not had to go through that process "yet" so it's only when one applies for a new SIM card that one has to jump through these hurdles.
sonam
I have VOIP landline what is coming with DSL and cost me 1 Euro per month (100 calls/1500min) on any landline number (on my or other company), but I use it rarely.

Also I have prepaid cell phone but I don't use it to much. I like drink coffee or something else Cool in nice place and meet my friends.

Sonam
Ankhanu
chatrack wrote:
Land line is maintained by govt. authorities and more trusty than, any mobile company.

Household People always trust land line than mobile no.


No.
Here in North America at least, land line phone infrastructure and services are maintained by private companies... often the same companies that provide and maintain the cellular networks.

There are more steps in setting up a land line, but no less verification of identity; particularly with contracts rather than month-to-month. I've had to reject a fair number of cellular applicants because they didn't pass background checks. It's easy to get landlines set up, and they don't require any more verification than a cellular activation, it just takes longer if a technician has to come and do an install.
watersoul
Ankhanu wrote:
chatrack wrote:
Land line is maintained by govt. authorities and more trusty than, any mobile company.

Household People always trust land line than mobile no.


No.
Here in North America at least, land line phone infrastructure and services are maintained by private companies... often the same companies that provide and maintain the cellular networks.

There are more steps in setting up a land line, but no less verification of identity; particularly with contracts rather than month-to-month. I've had to reject a fair number of cellular applicants because they didn't pass background checks. It's easy to get landlines set up, and they don't require any more verification than a cellular activation, it just takes longer if a technician has to come and do an install.


Same here in the UK, all landlines are operated by private companies these days. It's also usually easier to get a landline installed than a contract mobile phone, even with a poor credit rating.
I guess it's because the companies know that you are living in the place, although most insist on monthly direct debit payments.

'Pay as you go' top-up mobile SIM cards are dished out free by all the networks here though. Total anonymity, you can simply pay in cash to top up with no questions asked. The network I use gives me 300 minutes, 3000 texts/SMS, plus 'unlimited' internet each month for 15.00 which I can top up in cash at pretty much any local store nationwide - great to avoid being tied up in some contract that could trap me for 12 or more months. The phone also acts as a modem for my laptop (fast enough to stream youtube and the like) which is a bonus if there's no wifi available nearby Smile

*Edit* I've actually been into mobile phones continuously since 1993 when I bought my first one. They've always fitted much more conveniently into my life than a fixed landline when my life wasn't particularly fixed anywhere!
This is the same model, an early Motorola with no screen, no text/SMS capability, no camera etc, just a simple phone for making calls Laughing
saratdear
speeDemon wrote:
In India (or at least form the part I come from) every house has a landline phone.

Seconded. In fact, my house has 2 (one exclusively for me because my dad wouldn't get me a mobile..yet. Razz )

But the landline scenario is fast changing in India, because more than half the population has a mobile, I think.
sonam
saratdear wrote:
speeDemon wrote:
In India (or at least form the part I come from) every house has a landline phone.

Seconded. In fact, my house has 2 (one exclusively for me because my dad wouldn't get me a mobile..yet. Razz )

But the landline scenario is fast changing in India, because more than half the population has a mobile, I think.


Absolutely right for India! Six years ago when I leave India (after few years living there) only high and middle class peoples has mobile. Last year I am coming back and my watchman and cleaning lady have mobile, too.

Sonam
coolclay
I typically use a landline. I only have a local plan which is around $15/month, and then use google voice for long distance. Most places I go I would have no reception for a cell phone, and they are unreliable anyways. If the power goes down on the grid usually cell phone towers are lost as well. But phone lines work without power for the most part unless it is a cordless. I do have a pay per minute phone that I use in emergencies, but I spend at most $100 a year on it. I don't think landlines ever go away, because they are so important and there is so much that cell phones lack in terms of reliability. Both have a time and a place.
watersoul
coolclay wrote:
[...]Most places I go I would have no reception for a cell phone, and they are unreliable anyways[...]there is so much that cell phones lack in terms of reliability. Both have a time and a place.

Agreed, but certainly on this little island (UK) there are very few places which don't have a signal so a mobile is (to me) the most versatile option.
Some people argue that in the event of a national disaster or whatever they are no good, but to be fair there is no-one I care about that I can't get to in more than 3 or 4 days walking time.
Ankhanu
*shrug*
If I'm somewhere without cellular coverage, I'm also somewhere without a landline Wink.
watersoul
Ankhanu wrote:
*shrug*
If I'm somewhere without cellular coverage, I'm also somewhere without a landline Wink.

Yep, but you live in a beautifully vast land which you can escape into from cell-towers...jealous! Laughing
deanhills
Ankhanu wrote:
It's easy to get landlines set up, and they don't require any more verification than a cellular activation, it just takes longer if a technician has to come and do an install.
That's so true. It is probably one of the most efficient systems that I can remember. Provided that there were already lines installed, I remember all I had to do was phone Telus, and they would do everything automatically within the day, no lineups at all. When I visited a year ago, I noticed more people using cell phones, but the majority still preferred landlines as they are so much cheaper, very efficient and really work well. Cell phones are regarded more as a luxury, and used mostly for business reasons.
watersoul
deanhills wrote:
Cell phones are regarded more as a luxury, and used mostly for business reasons.

Different here fella, cellphones are pretty much the norm (for my generation) and I only ever call one landline for a chat...my mother!
deanhills
watersoul wrote:
deanhills wrote:
Cell phones are regarded more as a luxury, and used mostly for business reasons.

Different here fella, cellphones are pretty much the norm (for my generation) and I only ever call one landline for a chat...my mother!
Mostly the same here in the UAE. I don't think I know anyone who does not own a cell phone. From the info you have provided, I'm really impressed how easy it is to get hold of a cell phone in the UK. By the way, I did not realize you were living on an island. I thought you were living on the main land near the sea? The UAE is quite small, and I can't imagine there being a spot anywhere where one would not get a clear reception for cell phone. Their phone and cell services are really good, although I do battle periodically with ADSL in that the service is not always perfect, and now and then I have to get a technician out to check up on problems. I've noticed it always happens when they have done some major work in the area on the main lines.
watersoul
deanhills wrote:
[...] By the way, I did not realize you were living on an island. I thought you were living on the main land near the sea?[...]

I do live on the South West coast of the mainland but it's still an island! Maybe it's a big island but if I walk to the beach and turn left or right and keep walking with the sea on the same side I'll get back to the same place after I've worn enough shoes out!! Razz

...and yep, it's a potential criminals paradise here regarding mobile phones, cash changes hands with no questions!
Ankhanu
watersoul wrote:
Ankhanu wrote:
*shrug*
If I'm somewhere without cellular coverage, I'm also somewhere without a landline Wink.

Yep, but you live in a beautifully vast land which you can escape into from cell-towers...jealous! Laughing


That I do, and I love it Wink
If you ever find the money, time and inclination to get over here and explore our water ways, I'd be glad to show you around a bit and introduce you to some of our unique natural history.

[quote="deanhills"]
Ankhanu wrote:
When I visited a year ago, I noticed more people using cell phones, but the majority still preferred landlines as they are so much cheaper, very efficient and really work well. Cell phones are regarded more as a luxury, and used mostly for business reasons.


Depending on usage, land lines are actually more expensive.
If you're an infrequent user, a pay-as-you-go sort of cellular system is much cheaper than a land line. Cheapest land line I've seen advertised is $15/mo for just the service; tack on a cheap phone for, say $10, and you're looking at $180/yr, $190 for the first year (plus applicable taxes).
Cheapest cellular route I've seen is to buy a cheap pay-as-you-go phone (~$50) and get $100 worth of minutes (When buying <$100 of minutes, your left over minutes expire at the end of the month, unless you top them up with more; when you buy $100 of minutes they don't expire for a full year. This makes the first year cost $150 (+taxes on the phone, not on the minutes), $100/yr afterwards.

If you're using more talk time, cost will, obviously go up, but you can get decent contracts for $20-25/mo. which tends to be less than pay-as-you-go.

Having been a cellular salesman, I've gotta say that your assessment that they're seen as a luxury and mostly for business is patently false. Everyone, in all class ranges, have cell phones these days... and I live in a relatively rural part of the country. They are generally used for general purpose phone use, not for business. Many people are moving away from landlines across North America. It's true that they ARE more reliable, but they're also intrinsically tied to a specific location (both a boon and a ban depending on perspective), and MANY people see cellular phones as a necessity. Many of these same people also can't afford to pay for both cellular and landline service and opt to have only a cellular.
watersoul
Ankhanu wrote:

If you ever find the money, time and inclination to get over here and explore our water ways, I'd be glad to show you around a bit and introduce you to some of our unique natural history.

Cheers fella, I may well take you up on that offer one day as I've got an aunty & uncle who live in Toronto plus a couple of cousins in Edmonton, so with the generous (6 month) visa/travel timescale available for us Brits it's definitely on my 'to do' list - just got to save a bit of cash first.

Such a pity it's not as cheap as travelling in Asia though, I've made 4 weeks of my UK pay last for 8 months there! Smile

*Edit*
Back on topic, I'll make sure I check out the prices of a Canadian pay as you go mobile when I do it!
Ankhanu
watersoul wrote:
Ankhanu wrote:

If you ever find the money, time and inclination to get over here and explore our water ways, I'd be glad to show you around a bit and introduce you to some of our unique natural history.

Cheers fella, I may well take you up on that offer one day as I've got an aunty & uncle who live in Toronto plus a couple of cousins in Edmonton, so with the generous (6 month) visa/travel timescale available for us Brits it's definitely on my 'to do' list - just got to save a bit of cash first.

Such a pity it's not as cheap as travelling in Asia though, I've made 4 weeks of my UK pay last for 8 months there! Smile

*Edit*
Back on topic, I'll make sure I check out the prices of a Canadian pay as you go mobile when I do it!


I would suggest Telus or Bell if you get a temporary phone to travel the country, they have the best coverage coast to coast.

On a side note, it should be noted that I live a good 18hr drive or 4-5hr flight from Toronto in the opposite direction from your family Wink
deanhills
Ankhanu wrote:
I've gotta say that your assessment that they're seen as a luxury and mostly for business is patently false.
I stand corrected Embarassed :

However:
Quote:
On a global scale, however, Canada's rate of adoption of wireless telecommunications3 is lagging, with just under 52 subscribers per 100 inhabitants at the end of the first quarter of 2006, a level reached by the United States in the second half of 2003 (Statistics Canada 2006).
Source: Industry Canada

More up to date information (2009 stats):
Quote:
Half of all phone connections in Canada are now wireless.
75% of Canadian households have access to a wireless phone.
Canadians send 163 million text messages per day.
Each year, Canadians place more than 6 million calls to 9-1-1 or emergency numbers from their mobile phones.
Wireless revenues in Canada totalled $16.9 billion in 2009.
Wireless market sector revenues are the largest component (41%) of total telecommunications revenues.

Source: CWTA (Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association)Website

Ankhanu
Is the "However" part just pointing out that Canada is kinda sucking in terms of adoption (ie. we're slow) but still following the same general trend, or are you trying to highlight a different trend?
achowles
I personally would ditch the landline if it was an option. I don't actually make a huge amount of calls so I'm pretty sure I'd make a saving.

Yes, I can see landlines dying out. But equally I don't think that cellphones as they stand will replace them completely. For one thing you've got to take into account corporations and how impractical it would be to not have that one company phone number. You'd need to be looking at something completely networked and secure.
Feroc1ty
I currently NEED a landline phone for something, but I'd much rather preffer a mobile phone (can't wait till I can afford an iPhone 4, currently have a 3GS.)
Feroc1ty
I currently NEED a landline phone for something, but I'd much rather preffer a mobile phone (can't wait till I can afford an iPhone 4, currently have a 3GS.)
Ankhanu
Feroc1ty wrote:
I currently NEED a landline phone for something, but I'd much rather preffer a mobile phone (can't wait till I can afford an iPhone 4, currently have a 3GS.)


At this point in the year, I'd suggest waiting until the summer, when the next version is available. It might be worth the wait, or, if the upgrade isn't dramatic, the cost of a 4 will come down about $100.
deanhills
Ankhanu wrote:
Is the "However" part just pointing out that Canada is kinda sucking in terms of adoption (ie. we're slow) but still following the same general trend, or are you trying to highlight a different trend?
I wouldn't say Canada was sucking, but it is behind in the world trend. But then the information is dated 2006, so I would have to find more up to date information to check whether that is still the case, particularly since the more up to date records show quite an awesome growth in cell phones from 2006 to 2009. Maybe they have caught up with the world, or even got ahead?
Ankhanu
"Sucking" was provocative language, nothing more, simply meaning that while "succeeding", we're not doing as well as others Wink
ProwerBot
Ok talking on a cellular device is pure crapola. Seriously even when you have good coverage in a good area with a good service provider, call quality is okish at best. Landline phones sound thousands of times better. However, with increasing technology like with VoIP and stuff, cellular voice quality will surely get better and I'm sure someday they will sound as good as landlines today (and landlines will suck then because no one will have them so all the companies if they even still provide it won't even care about it, and it'll cost a few quarters a year or someshit.)
TurtleShell
I haven't had a landline in about 9 years. I would say they're probably dying since you obviously don't need them anymore.
deanhills
ProwerBot wrote:
Ok talking on a cellular device is pure crapola. Seriously even when you have good coverage in a good area with a good service provider, call quality is okish at best. Landline phones sound thousands of times better. However, with increasing technology like with VoIP and stuff, cellular voice quality will surely get better and I'm sure someday they will sound as good as landlines today (and landlines will suck then because no one will have them so all the companies if they even still provide it won't even care about it, and it'll cost a few quarters a year or someshit.)
Depends on your cell phone and cell phone service. My cell phone reception is as good, if not better than my land line. The part that I don't like about it however is when people are using their cell phones in restaurants or in public areas where one has to listen to their conversation whether one wants to or not. Or have to hear their cellphones ringing when they have decided not to answer it. I sometimes get the feeling that they think it is cool to be running around with a cell phone clamped to their one ear. Particularly also in shops, where they will continually bump into others, because they are not paying attention to their environment.
emanuel2
yes I think landline phones are dying, just because of the reason that there are no real advantages to mobile ones. I think there is maybe a trend to "static" phones in form of VoIP (voice over IP) usage, because of the cost advantages especially in the international point of view, e.g. international organisations profit from them.
ankitdatashn
Both have their own uses and advantages, The advantage with Landline is that it is a temporary kind of thing fixed at a particular place, when you gotta call you know it for sure it would be there where it was earlier, while compare it with a mobile phone, you keep it here, you keep it there... seems like travelling the whole house for you, and you never find it when you need it the most.

While the advantages associated with the mobile phone are innumerous, portability as already stated, while you can also avail the use of sending an sms when you cannot possibly make a call or when you want to convey something which you cannot convey directly or hesitate doing so, As the technology has merged so much the importance of mobile phones has grown accordingly, now you can listen to songs, see movies, project on the wall, take images of your friends.... etc etc... The mobile phone is here to stay Smile
rammy
In my opinion Land line phone is not died it has its own value. No doubt cellphone has a many benefits but Land line is also important in home.
the_emissary
Landlines are necessary in offices and governments organizations however I don't need one at home. This means they haven't (completely) died. It is similar to how email etc. has made post offices redundant (in my country) at least.
deanhills
My landline phone comes bundled in for free with my internet. It's also become the number of my internet account as well. I very rarely use it though. Probably why it comes bundled for free as well. Razz
75alex
I don't believe that landline phones will ever die, as they offer things that mobiles don't, since they (most of them) don't run out of battery, and are not put on silent.
RosenCruz
I believe they are. Slowly and painfully.

There is a regular fee in my country pay to the landline company, whether you use the phone or not. This is a big motive for people to close their subscriptions.

Companies are now offering 3g, iptv and similar bonuses to keep landlines open.
grofet
I think landline phone is very low in radiation. Landline phone is still popular in my country. The operator limit the service, but still the the landline still high in demand especially for new house. But, someday maybe landline phone will gone when majority of people starts using modern internet phone (voip) in the future.
spinout
landline is X times cheaper here in Sweden, and I got my internet throught that too cos the installation cost is low. I was in a trial against a cellphone company cos they put an ugly antenna in the central of my fine community, so naturally I feel bad about the concept of cellphones -> they come with ugly antennas...
andro_king
deanhills wrote:
I'm just wondering who are still using landline phones? I use a landline phone at work, but away from work, all my calls are on my mobile phone. While in Vancouver, Canada, I did not own a mobile phone. I had a landline with a very sophisticated answering machine, and that worked wonderfully. Everyone uses mobile phones where I am in the UAEr, so I had to join the crowd and do as the Romans do. How about you? What is your preference? Landline or mobile phone?


I cannot carry a landline all the time still I have a landline connection in my home but once away from home I will be using my mobile phone to stay connected.
standready
I still have a landline. I use it to make local calls and my DSL. I use Google Voice and Skype for long distance calls. I am considering dropping my traditional 'landline' for Voice Over Internet Protocol phone service completely.
I also have a prepaid cell phone for when I am out and I need to contact someone.
chatrack
When you get a call from land line, you can be sure that some one is at home/office
In case of mobile phone, there is uncertainty in location of call.
Teio
When mobile phones reception upgrades to a point when reception will never be bad, then they will replace landlines
DanielMartin1
according to me Yes
littevers1991
Of course they are. I mean who uses them anyway. Landline are no more useful these days because no one stays at home all day long. For daily commuting one uses mobile phones not landlines Laughing . So my vote goes to Mobile Phones.
BigGeek
I dumped the land line years ago. I thought it was ridiculous to pay close to $60 dollars a month for a base line with no features, by the time you added in call waiting, call forwarding, caller ID, and an answering service it could run you up to $80 a month and on top of that you still had to add a long distance carrier to your phone and pay per minuted to call long distance. At the time my cell phone was $80.00/month unlimited calling, texting, and data. I could call anywhere in the US for as long as I wanted at no extra charge. It was a no brainer I dumped the landline and used the mobile only.

Now that the cost of the mobile phone is $50.00/month for the same service, and the fact that the cost of the landline and services has gone up, it is even more worth it to just use the cell phone!!!

If the telephone companies don't start giving away the long distance and make the prices more affordable the land line will become a thing of the past.

Just my 2 cents!!
deanhills
Where I am in the UAE we have to have a land line if we want internet service. Only one real phone company as well. They make it affordable however by bundling it in as a "free" service with the very expensive internet service - ADSL. Local calls are free. Depending on the package there is a discount on international calls to a destination of choice. I very rarely use the land line. I don't use my mobile phone that much, but I do use it for my international calls.
ratanegra
Not in Venezuela. People call to my house's landline phone every day at all hours. Everyone in my house has a mobile phone, but still, people keep calling to our landline phone. I had never looked at it this way, but now I wonder why they do it if they can just call our personal mobile phones...
harrer
Landlines are still more secure I think. Every hacker these days is focused on smartphone attacks that not many people these days attack landlines. So for talking to your bank, landlines are still a great option.
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