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Can a hijacker be a keylogger too?





foumy6
Okay so after getting very suspitous at recent acts done by others on my computer I ran malwarebytes and it found two hijackers on my computer and I just was wondering if I need to change all my passwords if it could have been a keylogger? It was gotten from the site www.mymixer.com
ocalhoun
I don't know of any that combine both functions, but surely it is possible.

Couldn't hurt to change the passwords... and also think about the possibility of credit card information or personal information being compromised if you've bought anything online or filled out any online forms.
Also, try to figure out how they got access in the first place, and improve your security... Get your browser and OS security updates, whatever program scanned for and found the hijackers, make sure it gets updated and make sure you start having it auto-scan regularly.
foumy6
ocalhoun wrote:
I don't know of any that combine both functions, but surely it is possible.

Couldn't hurt to change the passwords... and also think about the possibility of credit card information or personal information being compromised if you've bought anything online or filled out any online forms.
Also, try to figure out how they got access in the first place, and improve your security... Get your browser and OS security updates, whatever program scanned for and found the hijackers, make sure it gets updated and make sure you start having it auto-scan regularly.


I have mcafee and malwarebytes
jdelfire
don't take the risk...
anything that involves PII (Personal Identifiable Information)
username, password, credit cards, etc...

you better start changing your security because when I was still working in Dell as a virus/spyware removal tech.Whenever a customer gets infected by any spyware, malware, hijacker etc... gets magically billed on their credit cards like ordering pizza, ordering online stuffs...

btw don't get your hopes up that these people will get caught.. most of them are outside your country so good luck with the lawsuit...
FunDa
Yes, change your passwords. And make sure your somputer is completely clean from viruses or worms or trojans



Any virus could be having a keylogger and could be stealing your information.
IceCreamTruck
ocalhoun wrote:
and also think about the possibility of credit card information or personal information being compromised if you've bought anything online or filled out any online forms.


ocalhoun is right, but also consider that they can farm this info from any browser that you have told to remember form data. This is usually the way they gather this information more reliably than by watching over your shoulder with a key-logger. Check your browsers as they all (IE, Chrome, Opera) usually report what form data they are remembering and allow to you edit the info... don't edit, just remove as this is targeted information anyway, and better security to remove it and enter this info only "on demand" into web forms.

A hijack, by definition, is redirecting you to another site even though you've requested something normal like "Google.com" and typically won't come with a key-logger, but will farm data from your browser cache. Key-loggers are obvious to antivirus programs as a threat, so they usually confine mal-ware and spy-ware to the sandbox of your browser... suspect anything within those confines as it's usually a MAJOR virus that breaks out of sandbox, but there are many many more spyware programs designed to farm data then there are successful key-loggers these days.

If antivirus finds key-logger now then I'd prepare for impending physical hack of your system as this kind of obvious attempt to get data from your secure system usually means there is someone out there who wants in, and mal-ware that hijacks your browser is usually more of an automated attack and will employ more subtle tactics in order to farm as much data as possible before the web, in general, is immune to the attack. Both are bad, but getting targeted by a physical attack is usually much worse than just picking up some spyware and mal-ware, but both can be equally damaging if the wrong information is leaked, or if the general security of your system is compromised.

Definitions:
Root kit -- rewrite of the basic security on your system to open doors. OS files directly affected, and the OS itself cannot be trusted after this type of infection. Complete reinstall is often required as it's VERY hard to get things back to normal because the OS supports or conceals the infection. Often, even though you remove it, the infection is renewed when you restart your system as part of a root kit is usually rewriting the boot records of your system as well. You system literally boots a virus first upon starting up insuring reinfection of the system.

Phishing -- either employing a hijack or simply a similar looking website or email to trick you into giving information for a legitimate company to a spy/farming operation. Not usually directly dangerous unless you've been hijacked and can no longer access whatever legitimate website they are redirecting you from. Of course, falling victim to this attack requires swift action and quickly notifying the company at which your information has been compromised. This is usually an old "host" file attack on windows OS. If you can't edit your own hosts file, then the infection is still present, or antivirus has it locked (which has obviously failed). Check this file after infection as this is typically where hijack entries are made locally on your machine. It's possible your browser files have been compromised in order to redirect certain traffic to bad sites, and this is a more modern way of redirecting without using the hosts file or redirection assurance across a multi-platform (Apple, WinOS, Linux) environment where the host file is not always present. Antivirus software usually just quarantines otherwise needed or useful browser files... reinstall browser to fix is sometimes needed.

Hijack -- using any means to redirect local traffic to imitation websites for the purpose of tricking you into entering valid data into a form that you recognize as something you usually use to login to familiar environments, such as, google, yahoo, microsoft, or worse ... your bank site.

Virus -- a program that replicates itself, and propagates to other available systems autonomously (without being told). This is effectively almost a non-issue. On modern computers with updated firewalls, and antivirus software this infection is usually stopped at the door, but can still be physically executed by the user. Phishing attempts are often covered by virus infection because people who fall victim to the farming of their data have usually activated inevitable virus infection because phishers like to cover their tracks with more harmful attacks that are unrelated to their efforts to farm. Phishers want your computer to die after they get what they want because it's usually where legal teams and security protection professionals begin gathering data on the phisher and what has been farmed, so phishers prefer to send this info to the grave.

Trojan -- I almost forgot our secretive buddy. This is any combination of the above in what appears to be a normal software install. Spyware usually comes bundled this way with other legitimate software in order to sublimely infect your computer. Virus scanning all downloaded files is recommended to prevent this modern attack. Do not proceed with files that your antivirus suggest are unsafe, and don't trust the download site to scan the download for you as all websites legit and fake are now claiming virus free downloads even when some of them know less than desirable software is bundled in their download package. Sometimes legitimate companies go bad in that they take large sums of money to allow this bundling of software from companies that have already destroyed their reputation and are having trouble getting people to install their spyware of free will.

Key-logger -- this is a tool employed by hackers either by physically gaining access to the machine (sitting down to a machine that's logged in but they still don't have the credentials) or by getting the user to absently install the infection. Just about any antivirus software is going to complain about any program actively logging keystrokes for all programs/browsers as this is obviously a security threat, so the hacker is probably going to have to install, and tell your antivirus to ignore this problem in order to have it run in the background on a well protected system. They are free to leave the computer at that point, however, because they will eventually have all your usernames and passwords feed to them over the web. Like I said before... if you find a key-logger suspect those close to your computer who may be trying to gain access to personal information or bank info as this attack rarely comes over the web as it's too obvious and modern security precautions usually have to be physically told to ignore this obvious problem. lock your computer when away (on windows this is [windows button] + "L") so people can't install things to farm your keystrokes to gain access to your system and personal information. It's possible your company employs a key-logger for internal security purposes, but this often presents further security threats, so it's generally safe and necessary to uninstall these programs which usually comply with user demands and don't reinstall themselves if you simply stop the program, delete the files, and the startup registry entries. Sometimes, but not always, uninstalling these programs is an option as they are often distributed as legitimate software for use on your computer (parents spying on their kids... etc.).

Have I left anything out guys ... a little bit much typing for now?!?! knowledge is power that I love to share... please help me if you have any information to support this, as our friends seem to need a complete definition.
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