FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Tyche the largest planet in our solar system





truespeed
Thought there may be a few people interested in this.

Quote:
The hunt is on for a gas giant up to four times the mass of Jupiter thought to be lurking in the outer Oort Cloud, the most remote region of the solar system. The orbit of Tyche (pronounced ty-kee), would be 15,000 times farther from the Sun than the Earth's, and 375 times farther than Pluto's, which is why it hasn't been seen so far.


Source: Read More
_AVG_
Honestly speaking, I wouldn't even consider it part of our Solar System if it is that far. Also, what's the point even if it does exist? I doubt any sort of life will be found there. I don't know, it's just my pessimistic opinion.
Ankhanu
_AVG_ wrote:
Also, what's the point even if it does exist? I doubt any sort of life will be found there. I don't know, it's just my pessimistic opinion.


By that reasoning, there's no reason to bother thinking about any of the other planets in our solar system... or even bothering to look beyond our solar system; almost none of the planets out there are likely to support life, so why bother?

Life is neat and all (speaking as a biologist Razz ), but it's hardly the point of astronomy.

What you or I consider "part of our Solar system" is kinda immaterial, isn't it? If those who are experts in the field consider it part of the system, that holds a bit more weight than those of us uneducated (or less educated) in the field. If it's in orbit, it's part of the system, right? Doesn't much matter how far out it is, if it's bound to the Sun's gravity, it's close enough Razz
It's kinda like leaving the definition of biological species to grade schoolers Razz
SonLight
Comets are being thrown around out there, and they're not sure why. Since the comets wind up coming relatively near the sun, this planet (or whatever they finally decide to call it) is definitely a part of the Solar system if it exists, even though it's a quarter of the way to the nearest star.

It sounds like they have reason to believe they have caught it on film, now they just have to figure out which reel Laughing . In the 1930's, Clyde Tombaugh looked through many pairs of photographs with a "blink comparator", looking for an object that was missing or had moved on one of the photos. Today, the problem is usually finding a real signal in the presence of noise. From the article, it appears they expect Tyche is warmer than its surroundings. There are probably lots of images of Tyche, so they need to find a pattern of repeated signals indicative of a certain temperature. Only a computer could find the persistent pattern in the presence of random noise of greater magnitude.
devndez
hmm too bad that this brown dwarf isn't 75 times of the size/mass of jupiter.. then we would know for sure if it was there or not.. haha.. well the decreasing sizes of the planets that we know suggest that it wasn't there from the beginning.. i wonder how it got there..
ocalhoun
Hm, seems like the best way to find such a thing would be a very long range radar...

Even that far away, something larger than Jupiter should give a good, solid return.
The existing radio telescopes could be used as receivers; all you'd need would be a powerful transmitter.

(And as a bonus, depending on how sensitive it is, it might help discover other non-light-emitting objects in the solar system. I wouldn't be surprised if such a system discovered a bunch of Pluto-like planets farther out.)


Or, if it's warmer than its surroundings (and as large as they suppose), that would suggest that it is somewhere between a planet and a star... It should be emitting radiation on a variety of wavelengths - perhaps the radio telescopes could just look for that.
devndez
hmm or could it be possible to somehow find it with help of its magnetic field? i don't know if there is any technology that can make magnetic fields visible but the planet should have a massive magnetic field since i guess the core should be of the same kind as jupiters which produces a great magnetic field too..
Ankhanu
ocalhoun wrote:
Hm, seems like the best way to find such a thing would be a very long range radar...

Even that far away, something larger than Jupiter should give a good, solid return.
The existing radio telescopes could be used as receivers; all you'd need would be a powerful transmitter.

(And as a bonus, depending on how sensitive it is, it might help discover other non-light-emitting objects in the solar system. I wouldn't be surprised if such a system discovered a bunch of Pluto-like planets farther out.)


Let's assume that the radar would use waves traveling at the speed of light for simplicity...

truespeed wrote:

Quote:
The orbit of Tyche (pronounced ty-kee), would be 15,000 times farther from the Sun than the Earth's, and 375 times farther than Pluto's, which is why it hasn't been seen so far.


Given that it take ~8min for light to travel from the Sun to Earth, it would take ~83 days for the radar waves from Earth to reach Tyche; 166 days for the return. I'd hate to be the one trying to make the position/rotation calculations required to detect the return signal.
Ignoring the changes in spatial location (and orientation) following 45% of a year to completion, that's a vast distance to cover for a wave that would be losing intensity (spreading out) through its journey, especially following the scattering effect that hitting a large planetary body would cause. The emitter would have to be capable of an extremely focused emission, and the detector would have to be extremely sensitive to the greatly diminished return signal. We do have some very sensitive receivers, but I'm unsure we have the technology to produce a sufficient emitter.

I'm not an astronomer, though, I'm certainly not well versed in current scope technologies (or even obsolete technologies). I could certainly be underestimating what we have available.


ocalhoun wrote:
Or, if it's warmer than its surroundings (and as large as they suppose), that would suggest that it is somewhere between a planet and a star... It should be emitting radiation on a variety of wavelengths - perhaps the radio telescopes could just look for that.


This seems like a reasonable assumption and course of action to me.
ocalhoun
Ankhanu wrote:

truespeed wrote:

Quote:
The orbit of Tyche (pronounced ty-kee), would be 15,000 times farther from the Sun than the Earth's, and 375 times farther than Pluto's, which is why it hasn't been seen so far.


Given that it take ~8min for light to travel from the Sun to Earth, it would take ~83 days for the radar waves from Earth to reach Tyche; 166 days for the return. I'd hate to be the one trying to make the position/rotation calculations required to detect the return signal.
Ignoring the changes in spatial location (and orientation) following 45% of a year to completion, that's a vast distance to cover for a wave that would be losing intensity (spreading out) through its journey, especially following the scattering effect that hitting a large planetary body would cause. The emitter would have to be capable of an extremely focused emission, and the detector would have to be extremely sensitive to the greatly diminished return signal. We do have some very sensitive receivers, but I'm unsure we have the technology to produce a sufficient emitter.

I'm not an astronomer, though, I'm certainly not well versed in current scope technologies (or even obsolete technologies). I could certainly be underestimating what we have available.

True, it wouldn't be easy, but I think it would be possible.
If I were to do it, I would encode each out-going pulse with a unique sequence of frequency shifts, so that you could send out multiple pulses at once, and yet still know which one(s) arrived back.
It helps that space would be a near-ideal setting for such a system, no background clutter, no atmospheric effects, very little electronic noise bleeding over.
Even so, it would probably take quite a while, especially if the transmitter and/or receiver were very focused and had to be aimed at probable positions... There would be a LOT of sky to scan.
Related topics
Nasa discovers a tenth planet???
Nasa discovers a tenth planet???
The 10th planet
Water found on Saturn's moon
Which is your fave Planet
A new definition of a Planet
Pluto is no longer a planet
Pluto - After Effects
The Pluto Story - For people who sent PMs
Where did life originated?
New Planet Like Earth Found in Space?
How many planets are there in our solar system?
Studying a gaint planet
Free Solar System Widget!
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Science -> The Universe

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.