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Relocation Advice Wanted (update: more specific)






Given what I know about you, you'd like ____ the best:
A*****
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Oregon/Washington State
25%
 25%  [ 1 ]
Appalachian Mountains
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Northern Rockies (but not Denver)
25%
 25%  [ 1 ]
Other: ________
25%
 25%  [ 1 ]
Houyhnhnm Land
25%
 25%  [ 1 ]
Total Votes : 4

ocalhoun
In one year, I'll be moving, to take advantage of a very nice scholarship grant.
I like where I'm at now, but there's no good schools in the area, and a change of scenery wouldn't hurt anyway. I will be spending 3 to 5 years at the new location though, so I want to be picky about it. (Needs to be within the USA though, to qualify for the scholarship.)

But where?
These are the general areas I'm thinking about:
1- A*****
2- Oregon/Washington (East of the mountains, where hopefully the climate is dryer and the housing cheaper.)
3- Smoky Mountain Vicinity (Eastern Tennessee, Western N. Carolina, et cetera)
4- Maybe somewhere in the Northern half of the Rocky Mountains, though I don't care for Denver (too fake, too full of itself, too vain), and can't think of anywhere else in that area.
(5- I guess you can pick up on the pattern... If you think of another area I might like, mention it.)

I've already done some research about A*****. I would enjoy the wilderness there, but I'm beginning to decide against it, since for most of the year it would simply be far too cold... So I won't ask questions about that one.

The other two though, I have some questions about, if anybody has lived there or is familiar with those areas.
I've been to both areas, and enjoy the climate/scenery/recreational opportunities... but I have some more practical questions:

-What are the good schools in those areas? I would prefer a school that teaches practical skills (like engineering, welding, et cetera) in a degree-type program (a good 4-year physics/engineering program would be interesting as well). Cheaper is better, as it will leave me with more money to live on. I'm also not concerned with the 'traditional college lifestyle' I will NOT be living in dorms, nor do I care for a 'party school'. I have two associate's degrees and outstanding test scores; getting into a school shouldn't be a challenge.
-Where are some good towns/localities to live in in these general areas? (I prefer cheap housing and open spaces, but still want to be within easy distance of a mid-size town, and hopefully even within range of non-satellite communications.) In any of the last three locations listed, I would want to be within easy driving distance of the mountains... possibly even within them. I would still want room for horse(s) though.
-What is the cost of living like in these areas? Is housing expensive? Are other things extraordinarily expensive?
-What about legal issues? Do these areas have onerous laws about firearms, cars, animals, et cetera? Do they have high/annoying taxes/fees? Do they charge state income tax? (Basically, I'm used to a laid-back government in SD, and I fear that the East or West coast areas might offend my libertarian sensibilities.)
-Are people there friendly? Anyone who has seen the difference between rural and urban attitudes will know what I'm asking... Basically, are crime rates low? Would a stranger help you if you were stranded? Do strangers hold the door open for you, just because it is polite?

I can already answer these questions about A***** to my satisfaction, but I'm not sure about the others, so please let me know if you have any good advice/info about living and going to school in these areas.


(Sorry about dumping this in General Chat; the problem wasn't that it didn't fit in any category; it fit in too many categories, and I didn't want to limit the discussion to just one aspect of the places in question.)
(A***** self-censored, because I fear the novelty of the idea would cause the discussion to be centered around that place, which I know enough about already.)
deanhills
What about Boulder, Colorado? I would have thought that would have been a natural place for you? Not too big, not too small, plenty of mountains to test your equipment in Smile Friendly town. From what I've heard nice vibes. And not too far from Denver either for a major connection route to where you are living now? And it looks like a good University, depending what you want to study.

Here is the link to its University:
http://colorado.edu/

And the programmes you may be interested in:
http://admissions.colorado.edu/undergraduate/academics/engineering

And Boulder:
http://www.bouldercolorado.gov/
standready
I would have thought you would have considered Blacksburg, Virgina and Virgina Tech. Remember this:
http://www.frihost.com/forums/vt-114041.html
Good engineering school but maybe too far east for you.
Searching engineering schools, it seems more choices in the eastern US. I went to Purdue (mole hills, no mountains).
deanhills
standready wrote:
I would have thought you would have considered Blacksburg, Virgina and Virgina Tech. Remember this:
http://www.frihost.com/forums/vt-114041.html
Good engineering school but maybe too far east for you.
Searching engineering schools, it seems more choices in the eastern US. I went to Purdue (mole hills, no mountains).
I was thinking the exact same thing! But at least it now makes sense, as I can imagine Ocalhoun must have researched most of the places to their minutest of details.

Why Alaska though? It is Alaska isn't it? If I could live really high above sea level as in Boulder, be close to the mountains and plenty of retreats in the wilderness, also be close to a major exit route such as Denver, yet have the luxury of a very good University, I think those would be my criteria for a really good scholarship place that I have to stay at for five years. Boulder does seem to be above the average for cost of living, but I think with innovation it may turn into cheaper. You probably would have a great chance of finding a homestead just outside Boulder that you could "room" at for free, and house all your trucks and hobbies as well as Filly. It could be a property that has been bought "for spec" by someone and needs looking after. I would check up with Estate Agencies, or just put an ad in their local magazines, or better yet, visit the place. If you were interested in applied sciences, your improvised trucks and some of the camping equipment and the way you put them together could already serve as natural completed projects for those courses. Smile

Another place that has me curious is Idaho, as a friend of mine from South Africa went all the way to study there. I can't remember the city, could have been Boise, but it looks as though it could be cheaper than Colorado. Would be interesting to live in a place like Moscow in Idaho. The University of Idaho in Moscow does not look shabby at all. Cost of living is below the average, it is surrounded by great parks and the wilderness, only has 25,000 people living in it. Lots of space for you.
ocalhoun
standready wrote:
I would have thought you would have considered Blacksburg, Virgina and Virgina Tech. Remember this:
http://www.frihost.com/forums/vt-114041.html
Good engineering school but maybe too far east for you.
Searching engineering schools, it seems more choices in the eastern US. I went to Purdue (mole hills, no mountains).

Not too bad of an idea, actually...
I'll have to add it to my list of places to research thoroughly.

I could go to school with yagnyavalkya ^.^

deanhills wrote:
What about Boulder, Colorado?


Might be okay, though I'm not sure I would list 'close to Denver' as an asset...
I'm suspicious that it might absorb some of Denver's culture, and the closeness would likely drive up property/rent prices.
Still, worth looking into I suppose.


deanhills wrote:
I was thinking the exact same thing! But at least it now makes sense, as I can imagine Ocalhoun must have researched most of the places to their minutest of details.

Not yet; right now I'm fishing for general information that will help narrow down the list of places to research.
You can bet I'll have everything figured out before I decide on an area though. Fortunately, I have a year to research, decide, and prepare.
Quote:

Why Alaska though? It is Alaska isn't it?

Because there are some amazing parks there, and huge tracts of true wilderness.
Downsides though: it can be expensive to live there, and it gets very cold for a long part of the year. I'm not sure how much of that wilderness I'd be able to enjoy during the short summers.

Quote:
If I could live really high above sea level as in Boulder, be close to the mountains and plenty of retreats in the wilderness, also be close to a major exit route such as Denver, yet have the luxury of a very good University, I think those would be my criteria for a really good scholarship place that I have to stay at for five years. Boulder does seem to be above the average for cost of living,

I see you're a fan of Boulder. ^.^
I'm not too terribly concerned about a 'good' university though. I mainly want to learn practical things I can use for my own pursuits... I'm not sure that I want a job where technological degrees would help... And there's certainly no job I want that would be snooty about my choice of colleges; most would be thoroughly impressed by just a simple community college associate's degree. (Not to mention two of them, plus a bachelor's. ^.^) Actually, I forgot to mention it, but if I managed to use this scholarship to learn professional horse training, that's a career I wouldn't mind doing.
(Ideally, I want a 4-year degree that includes welding, truck driving, gunsmithing, mechanical engineering, and horse training. *disappointment imminent* If only rule 34 applied to universities...)
Quote:
but I think with innovation it may turn into cheaper. You probably would have a great chance of finding a homestead just outside Boulder that you could "room" at for free, and house all your trucks and hobbies as well as Filly. It could be a property that has been bought "for spec" by someone and needs looking after. I would check up with Estate Agencies, or just put an ad in their local magazines, or better yet, visit the place.

No matter where I end up choosing, this will be my approach. I need to live very frugally to make this work well. The scholarship includes a housing allowance, but I intend to use that allowance for all my monetary needs (plus doing occasional odd jobs for extra spending money)... which means super-cheap housing is a must.
Room sharing/special arrangements are likely.
Quote:
If you were interested in applied sciences, your improvised trucks and some of the camping equipment and the way you put them together could already serve as natural completed projects for those courses. Smile

Oh, the projects I would build with sufficient budget, training, and tools. ^.^
Modernized power-ballista (Up to 12,000lb draw weight ^.^), rock crawler with inter-dependent tandem axles, integrated survey tool, mag-lev suspension, EMP gun...
I'm getting ahead of myself though.
Step 1 is to find a good school/place to live.
Quote:

Another place that has me curious is Idaho, as a friend of mine from South Africa went all the way to study there. I can't remember the city, could have been Boise, but it looks as though it could be cheaper than Colorado. Would be interesting to live in a place like Moscow in Idaho. The University of Idaho in Moscow does not look shabby at all. Cost of living is below the average, it is surrounded by great parks and the wilderness, only has 25,000 people living in it. Lots of space for you.

Another good place to look into perhaps...


Hm... this narrowing down of places to research isn't working very well... Rather than disqualifying areas, I'm adding new areas to research. I guess that's a good thing though. It may be that one of these places I hadn't thought of ends up being the perfect spot.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
I'm not too terribly concerned about a 'good' university though. I mainly want to learn practical things I can use for my own pursuits... I'm not sure that I want a job where technological degrees would help... And there's certainly no job I want that would be snooty about my choice of colleges; most would be thoroughly impressed by just a simple community college associate's degree. (Not to mention two of them, plus a bachelor's. ^.^) Actually, I forgot to mention it, but if I managed to use this scholarship to learn professional horse training, that's a career I wouldn't mind doing.
I don't agree. In my experience one does not only learn from those who are teaching, but from fellow students as well, in fact I sometimes learned more from them, it is sort of a total thing. And the quality of students, and the distribution of students that are taken in, could liven things up when you are being challenged, or make it very boring if you are not being challenged. These other students may become like an extended family of sorts as well so perhaps you need to add some knowledge of that in your investigation. As I'm almost certain if you are going to opt for applied sciences that you will be working in groups.

I checked around on Boulder, but I'm sure you could do that for any of the places you are interested in, and I saw students advertising to look after places, like long-term house sitting in exchange of maintaining the place etc. Perhaps you can already check out Websites that specialize in this, as you may be able to find LOTS OF SPACE by doing that kind of thing, instead of rooming with someone, which is OK for the short-term, but can become irritating after a while. You could even think of investing in a property yourself. A friend of mine in South Africa for example had a hobby of buying houses and doing them up while he was a student. By the time he graduated he was wealthy in his own right. He obviously had loads of energy, and was also good at this kind of thing. Would be awesome if you could find a farm close to the place you choose for looking after horses! Very Happy
standready
Alaska, nice place to visit but I would not want to live year round. Plus as you said - expensive.

EMP gun! I really must get myself one of those! A hunting we will go! laugh
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
I'm not too terribly concerned about a 'good' university though. I mainly want to learn practical things I can use for my own pursuits... I'm not sure that I want a job where technological degrees would help... And there's certainly no job I want that would be snooty about my choice of colleges; most would be thoroughly impressed by just a simple community college associate's degree. (Not to mention two of them, plus a bachelor's. ^.^) Actually, I forgot to mention it, but if I managed to use this scholarship to learn professional horse training, that's a career I wouldn't mind doing.
I don't agree. In my experience one does not only learn from those who are teaching, but from fellow students as well, in fact I sometimes learned more from them, it is sort of a total thing. And the quality of students, and the distribution of students that are taken in, could liven things up when you are being challenged, or make it very boring if you are not being challenged. These other students may become like an extended family of sorts as well so perhaps you need to add some knowledge of that in your investigation. As I'm almost certain if you are going to opt for applied sciences that you will be working in groups.

A good point, I suppose. I hadn't thought of that aspect.
In that case, it may be better to look for a school that is not prestigious (expensive), but which places a lot of emphasis on applied science/engineering.
Quote:

You could even think of investing in a property yourself. A friend of mine in South Africa for example had a hobby of buying houses and doing them up while he was a student. By the time he graduated he was wealthy in his own right.

That would have been fantastic advice 10 years ago.
But, after the housing bubble, I hesitate to think of housing as an investment.
(Though I suppose I wouldn't be entirely opposed to the mythical foreclosed-on-and-everybody-just-wants-to-get-rid-of-it-at-any-price deal.)
Given the uncertainty in the housing (and mortgage) market, and the fact that I'll likely only stay 4 years or so, purchasing doesn't seem to be the best of ideas.
I would purchase if an unbelievably good opportunity just fell in my lap, but otherwise, I'm after housing with less long-term obligations.

standready wrote:

EMP gun! I really must get myself one of those! A hunting we will go! laugh

Hunting electronics maybe...
Not too many practical (and legal) uses for one, but it would make a fantastic class project. ^.^
ocalhoun
Okay, I've done some (a lot) of basic research, and narrowed it down to 6 choices of cities - I think I would be happy in any of these, though I'm not overly familiar with any of them.
(There are also some backups, but those are second-rate choices, though they would do in a pinch.)

Here they are, ranked by what my preference is so far:
1-Coeur D'Alene ID
2-Klamath Falls OR
3-Olympia WA
4-Sandpoint ID
5-Butte MT
6-Idaho Falls ID

My notes on these places:
( '$--' is short for 'school:', and proceeds a note about a specific school in/near the city)
(all dollar amounts are monthly)
Quote:

1+
@ :) Coeur D'Alene ID
15/10/35mins to fun
flat area near vast mountainous area
commutable to Spokane WA (34min) a big city, but not too big
upper slopes are forested
plains have both forests and vast open fields
mild climate, with med-low precipitation
home of the appaloosa breed probably a great horse place
$--Washington State University (branch campus in spokane, main in pullman, still close enough spokane campus has no good programs pullman not in commuting distance)
$--U. of Idaho (largest campus in state physics, good mech engineering program )
$--New St. Andrews College (single program about christian worldview, classic literature not my kind of place)
$--Gonzaga U. (extensive writing notable debate team decent engineering dept. with mech engineering places moderate emphasis on engineering)
$--Whitworth U. (offers scholarships for high grades applied physics, engineering physics, pre-engineering)
$--Community Colleges of Spokane (mech. Engineering tech, pre-engineering, pre-physics, truck driving, heavy equip some good 'extras')
$--E. Washington University (has mech engineering,engineering,physics but doesn't seem to place high emphasis on them longer commute)
A variety of decent universities, nothing special, but entirely good enough
allowance- $822
Places from $400 to $1050
Rooms from $200 to $500
a few unique opportunities
**A pretty good choice**


2+
@ Medford/Ashland/Klamath Falls OR
16/68/15mins to fun (respectively)
Very dramatic terrain, lots of parks nearby, with a lot of variety
Medford and Ashland are close together, Klamath is farther away
Flat areas are full of farms, but pastures could probably be found there as well
Mountainous areas are heavily forested
Border area between flat and mountainous looks great for horses
Klamath flat area is much more clear and grassy
Medford is a big town, not good to live IN, but great to live NEAR
Ashland is basically a suburb of Medford
Klamath is a perfectly sized city, looks like very nice place
Area can be very horse friendly green pastures
Very nice climate usually between 31 and 90, Med-low rainfall
Gets extremely foggy sometimes
Klamath has easy geothermal heating
$--K--Klamath Community College (has welding certificate)
$--K--Oregon Institute of Technology (Klamath seems to be the primary campus lots of great degree programs including a mechanics program that has welding)
$--M--Southern Oregon University (No attractive degree programs)
$--M--Rouge Community College (Cooperates with OIT, see above has welding in both degree and certificate has truck driving certificate)
Medford and Klamath are 90mins away from each other. Living in a central location might enable attendance of schools in both cities
allowance- $954M, $645K
K places for $545 to $1200, rooms for $195 to $400
M places for $500 to $1200, rooms for $300 to $500
Kinda low on unique opportunities, but some of the shared rooms were on horse properties
**Pretty good choice; nice area; great schools; attending both schools would involve long commutes (93min)**


3+
@ :) Olympia WA
Too rainy? - 164 days out of year - almost half rain - lower snowfall than expected though
49/59 min to fun (could live halfway between fun and town though)
Lots of trees.
Bigger town, but not quite too big
good horse places on outskirts
seems a bit less horse friendly though - but craigslist listings look good
Really good schools
$--St. Martin's University (looks pretty nice - has some good programs especially mech. engineering - kinda pricey - true university)
$--S. Puget Sound Community College (2 year school - good program selection, including welding both degree and certificate)
$--Evergreen State College (Hippie school - no good practical programs)
allowance- $1029.00
Affordable housing (compared to bah)!!!
Rooms for $300 to $500
Homes for $800 to $1200
Good on unique housing opportunities!
**A great place; very few downsides.**


4+
@ :) Sandpoint ID
13/20/53mins to fun
flat, but very mountainous surrounding region
mountains are heavily forested and don't seem to have any houses
flat areas are almost perfect for horses when cleared
Town is on a lake and actually has a gorgeous beach
$--University of Idaho (satellite campus no good degrees available at this campus)
$--North Idaho College(has welding physics outdoor leadership machine technology engineering - CDL)
4year school is worthless, but the 2year school has many good programs perhaps enough to just go there for several different ones.
allowance- $891
>No Craigslist page anywhere near<
would need to find a local publication
**Good choice, but would be hard to find housing**


5+
@ :) Anaconda/Butte MT
21/13/23mins to fun
flat area with low mountains all around; larger mountians within easy driving distance
flat area is good for horses, dakota-like, but flat
high area is heavily wooded, but probably has good spots
kinda chilly
polluted avoid mining areas, filter water
good horse town
$--Montana Tech. (4-year general engineering with mech, weld, civil options pretty good school)
allowance- $753
Places from $360 to $850
Rooms from $200 to $325 scarce
no unique opportunities found
ads are sparse
**good school, good area housing may be scarce though, and pollution is a concern**


6+
@ :) Idaho Falls ID
64/99/93/68/68mins to fun wide variety though (includes rockies, craters of the moon, and yellowstone) has several communities halfway between fun and Idaho Falls
47mins to pocatello
46mins to St. Anthony
49mins to Atomic City
cultural hub for region
climate between 104 and 12
$--Idaho State University (has 2year russian program has mech. Engineering and physics, including some nice graduate programs aircraft powerplant many welding options great options!)
$--Eastern Idaho Technical College (has many welding options - 2year)
Surprisingly fantastic school!
allowance- $720
Places from $450 to $1200
Rooms from $150 to $700
unique opportunities are scarce, but real estate is very cheap, horse properties in the 50K range!
Good horse area
**Great area, great school only downside is long commuting, which might be overcome by a perfectly placed house**


If you have any experience in these places, let me know about it!
(Especially if it is about some factor that I haven't taken any note of yet!)
deanhills
I don't have any experience with the places in your short list, except Olympia, as I have lived in Vancouver BC for a number of years. You won't like the rain during winter. For sure. I would nix it for that, as well as that you have many other better alternatives listed in your research. I don't know what it is about the State of Washington for me. It was always nice to visit it, but I was always glad to return to Vancouver. I don't think it could ever feel like a home for me.

My first choice would be Idaho Falls (gut feel). It has an excellent University that is internationally known. You may connect up with some interesting people, the cost of living is low enough to contemplate relocating (probably a practical thing to do). It is a good horse area!!!! What more do you need? Smile

I am unfamiliar with Coeur D'Alene ID, but with the information you provided it looks like a good runner up. Looks as though it has a good University as well.

Don't know why however. Idaho Falls just stands completely out for me out of the places you listed. Very Happy
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
I don't have any experience with the places in your short list, except Olympia, as I have lived in Vancouver BC for a number of years. You won't like the rain during winter. For sure. I would nix it for that, as well as that you have many other better alternatives listed in your research. I don't know what it is about the State of Washington for me. It was always nice to visit it, but I was always glad to return to Vancouver. I don't think it could ever feel like a home for me.

Hm... I had worried about the rain...
Perhaps it deserves a lower place on the list, but I think it should still be on the list.
Is it the all-day drizzle type, or the once-a-day-downpour type?
I could handle frequent-but-short storms easily enough, but all-day storms would definitely kick it down lower on the list.
Quote:

My first choice would be Idaho Falls (gut feel). It has an excellent University that is internationally known. You may connect up with some interesting people, the cost of living is low enough to contemplate relocating (probably a practical thing to do). It is a good horse area!!!! What more do you need? Smile

[...]

Don't know why however. Idaho Falls just stands completely out for me out of the places you listed. Very Happy

Well, the only issue with Idaho Falls is the distance to recreation... Between an hour and an hour and a half to get anywhere. (While most of the others have places available within a quarter to half an hour, or even less.)
I could live half-way, but the layout is such that the different parks are all arranged in a circle around it; closer to one would be further from another.
The parks that are 'close' are good ones though, including Yellowstone, if I recall correctly.
The school is really good though...
Well, my next step will be to get much more detailed information on the schools in these 6 places - that additional information might bring this choice up or down on the list (especially since the school is the strong point of it).
I think I might swap it with Sandpoint... Sandpoint is starting to seem like simply too small of a town; too many things would be unavailable or hard to find (and with no larger town anywhere close).
Quote:

I am unfamiliar with Coeur D'Alene ID, but with the information you provided it looks like a good runner up. Looks as though it has a good University as well.

There's a reason it's my #1 pick even though I've never heard of it before either... ^.^
The schools aren't the absolute best fit, but they're still pretty good, and everything else about it seems to be fantastic.


I suppose my new preference list would be:
1-Coeur D'Alene ID
2-Klamath Falls OR
3-Idaho Falls ID
4-Olympia WA
5-Butte MT
6-Sandpoint ID
(Not sure about the last two though... perhaps they should swap places.)

(and for anyone wondering, there were a few Southern cities that made the green-list, but they were all second-rate compared to the list here. -- Mainly because good schools were scarce; the overwhelming majority of schools were bible colleges that placed little or no emphasis on what I wanted to learn. -- The exception being Virginia Tech, but the more I looked into that school, the less I liked it.)
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
Hm... I had worried about the rain...
Perhaps it deserves a lower place on the list, but I think it should still be on the list.
Is it the all-day drizzle type, or the once-a-day-downpour type?
I could handle frequent-but-short storms easily enough, but all-day storms would definitely kick it down lower on the list.
It is the incessant never-ending, never-stopping drizzling variety. And the most boring rain I've ever seen. I've never seen a storm in Vancouver. No big drops. Just mickey mouse type of rain. And now and then a little bit of wind to make it a bit more interesting. Also, Olympia is quite big. Maybe too many people per square mile of space? Smile

Your first choice looks dead right for size and being close to all your recreation places. I checked and it would seem that Coeur D'Aline is growing, so may be a good place to invest in. Their Idaho University campus in Coeur D'Aline is quite young, and classes probably small, which would make it much nicer than enormous teaching auditoriums with too many students per square inch. So looks like a great choice from that point of view.
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
Hm... I had worried about the rain...
Perhaps it deserves a lower place on the list, but I think it should still be on the list.
Is it the all-day drizzle type, or the once-a-day-downpour type?
I could handle frequent-but-short storms easily enough, but all-day storms would definitely kick it down lower on the list.
It is the incessant never-ending, never-stopping drizzling variety. And the most boring rain I've ever seen. I've never seen a storm in Vancouver. No big drops. Just mickey mouse type of rain. And now and then a little bit of wind to make it a bit more interesting. Also, Olympia is quite big. Maybe too many people per square mile of space? Smile

Yeah, put in that light, Olympia doesn't sound very nice...

I might kick it off the list entirely, and go to a 5-city list.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
I might kick it off the list entirely, and go to a 5-city list.
Looking forward to the next list. What is your own personal deadline for a decision?

By the way, have you thought of Canada? Edmonton would be a great place for study and outdoors and it is not that far from the Rockies. It has an excellent University with international links - University of Alberta. It is surrounded by some fantastic parks. Neighbouring British Columbia has some remote places to explore in its North Eastern parts, not too far from Edmonton (Dawson's Creek is 368 miles from Edmonton ). The Alaska Highway 97 starts at Dawson's Creek.
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
I might kick it off the list entirely, and go to a 5-city list.
Looking forward to the next list. What is your own personal deadline for a decision?

About 8 months from now, I need to know where I'm going, that's when I'll be getting ready to move.
Quote:

By the way, have you thought of Canada?

I don't think my scholarship will pay for out-of-country schools.
Afaceinthematrix
Chico, California...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chico,_California

As far as education goes, they do have several universities there or around there.

Housing should be affordable. Chico is a small town with a lot of open land (and a lot of forest near by where you can have fun).

Like you, I prefer open land and more rural areas. However, sometimes I do like a good city and Northern California has a few - such as Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz is somewhat close and, in my opinion, one of the greatest cities in California. I think that you would even like that city because of how free (in the sense of personal freedom) the city is.

So I do think that Chico should be a consideration. It has a school (but I'll leave you to do the research on the school because I know nothing about the school), a lot of wide open land for camping and such, is near some great cities (also cities like San Francisco), and should be affordable. And the people are much better than the So.Cal. people I deal with all the time...
ocalhoun
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
Chico, California...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chico,_California

As far as education goes, they do have several universities there or around there.

Housing should be affordable. Chico is a small town with a lot of open land (and a lot of forest near by where you can have fun).

Like you, I prefer open land and more rural areas. However, sometimes I do like a good city and Northern California has a few - such as Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz is somewhat close and, in my opinion, one of the greatest cities in California. I think that you would even like that city because of how free (in the sense of personal freedom) the city is.

So I do think that Chico should be a consideration. It has a school (but I'll leave you to do the research on the school because I know nothing about the school), a lot of wide open land for camping and such, is near some great cities (also cities like San Francisco), and should be affordable. And the people are much better than the So.Cal. people I deal with all the time...

Well, the schools are pretty good, and the area's okay. I think it's good enough to make the backup-city list... but I'd be leery of it for two reasons:

1: California laws can be very lenient in some areas, but restrictive in others, especially gun laws.
2: There are a LOT of people around that area; although the town is a nice size, I'd like to be in a town like that which is the largest town for a long way, rather than one that is dwarfed by others in driving distance.
Population density map; the spikes represent high density areas:

Look at that general area, compared to Idaho.
Basically, I'd rather be in/near a medium-sized spike with no others around it, rather than a medium sized spike next to a lot of big ones.

Still, it's better than some of the other ones on my backup list.
Afaceinthematrix
ocalhoun wrote:
1: California laws can be very lenient in some areas, but restrictive in others, especially gun laws.


That's what I meant when I said that Santa Cruz is one of the most free places that I know. I figured that would attract you since you're very liberal (in the correct meaning of the word). It comes down to this: I've lived right out side of Los Angeles for more than 20 years. There isn't a place in the world that I feel safer (which is ironic because, based on the crime rate here, I certainly should not feel safe). I have a real sense of security here in my city. However, despite that, there are certain things that I would never, ever even dream about doing down here in and around Los Angeles but that I would do in Santa Cruz. I would never, even in my wildest dreams, even consider taking acid and going out in public. The police would have me arrested in seconds. Marijuana maybe, but other drugs, such as acid, HELL NO. You don't come across as a drug user to me (mainly because you're in the military and they have harsh rules), but I'm sure you'd like the idea of having the freedom of taking an acid hit in public and the police leaving you alone.

Gun laws aren't too bad. If you buy a gun, you have to register it and wait ten days to get it. Big deal. It's like that almost everywhere. Hunting laws are what is really much harder. Getting a hunting license is tougher in California than it is in any other place of the U.S. But still, it isn't too bad. It's just a long and boring class that you have take. But the good thing about getting a hunting license here is that a CA hunting license is good in all of the U.S.

And yes, CA, has a high population. Believe me, it gets to me. In 2012 I'm leaving CA with the understanding that I will never come back to live here. I really can't wait. But Northern California is, even according to your map, much different. The population is much less (there are extremely tiny towns with 100- people), the land is much more open, and the scenery is much better. I can even find you smaller towns in CA (California City, for instance), but you wanted to be near a school and a decent sized town. Plus, I wanted to tell you about some place near Santa Cruz because I thought you would like the town with a lot of personal freedom...

Anyways, good luck!
ocalhoun
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
but I'm sure you'd like the idea of having the freedom of taking an acid hit in public and the police leaving you alone.

True, but don't discount the other areas for that either.
One of the places I was looking at (Coeur D'Alene, I think) recently made news by instructing its police force to give drug enforcement (especially marijuana) their lowest priority, and focus on other crimes instead.
Quote:

Gun laws aren't too bad. If you buy a gun, you have to register it and wait ten days to get it. Big deal. It's like that almost everywhere.

Sorry, but I'm used to so much better.
In SD, no waiting period for any gun, only federal restrictions on gun types, concealed carry license can be gotten in 15 minutes for $10, no classes or anything, just fill out a form and get a background check. Open carry, and transporting in vehicles are not restricted at all, except that you need a concealed carry license to have a round in the chamber in a vehicle.
Quote:
Hunting laws are what is really much harder. Getting a hunting license is tougher in California than it is in any other place of the U.S. But still, it isn't too bad. It's just a long and boring class that you have take.

Taking a class for a hunting license? What madness is this?
Here, you don't even need a license for most things, just go buy a turkey/pheasant/deer/elk/whatever tag. (Or get a varmint license, which costs $5, and allows you to hunt pretty much anything not covered by the tag system.)
(Tags for the rarer animals are expensive and hard to get, but that's understandable - it prevents over-hunting.)
Quote:

And yes, CA, has a high population. Believe me, it gets to me. In 2012 I'm leaving CA with the understanding that I will never come back to live here. I really can't wait.

^.^ Now that makes me want to go there for sure!
Afaceinthematrix
Quote:
True, but don't discount the other areas for that either.
One of the places I was looking at (Coeur D'Alene, I think) recently made news by instructing its police force to give drug enforcement (especially marijuana) their lowest priority, and focus on other crimes instead.


That's basically Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz is also a nice place - beach town. You can walk around high or tripping out and not get bothered by the police. I was actually planning on making a trip up there in July and getting some acid. But if that plan fails, then I'm going on a backpacking trip for a week and once I'm at least 15 miles away, I'll trip. It's sort of annoying that I have to go to those lengths just to put something into my own body...

ocalhoun wrote:

Sorry, but I'm used to so much better.
In SD, no waiting period for any gun, only federal restrictions on gun types, concealed carry license can be gotten in 15 minutes for $10, no classes or anything, just fill out a form and get a background check. Open carry, and transporting in vehicles are not restricted at all, except that you need a concealed carry license to have a round in the chamber in a vehicle.


The ten day waiting limit that you will find almost anywhere is understandable. It's so that you don't get mad at your neighbor and then go out and buy a gun to take care of him/her. Ten days will give you time to think about it versus an impulse crime. And really, does it matter to you that much? How often do go out and buy a gun that day because you need it? It's not like you're going to the hardware store to buy a tool because your car broke down and you need to get to work today. If you're going to buy a gun to hunt, then you'll know more than ten days ahead.

And the hunting class isn't that bad or that expensive. It teaches you basic hunting safety so that you don't pull a Dick Cheney on someone.

Quote:

^.^ Now that makes me want to go there for sure!


Quite understandable. Anywhere where there's a certainty that I won't end up living must be a place worth living in! I can promise you that I will also never live in Oklahoma on the account that most of my family (that I don't like is there) and that Oklahoma sucks.
deanhills
How about earthquakes in California, an economy that is bankrupt and may have an effect on funding and development of schools? The possibility of an earthquake however would really be off putting to me especially if I would bring my horse with me. And crime rate? Coeur D'Alene sounds like a gem in comparison. It is new, it is growing and developing, classes are small. Sounds like a place with plenty of space. Smile
ocalhoun
Afaceinthematrix wrote:

The ten day waiting limit that you will find almost anywhere is understandable. It's so that you don't get mad at your neighbor and then go out and buy a gun to take care of him/her. Ten days will give you time to think about it versus an impulse crime. And really, does it matter to you that much? How often do go out and buy a gun that day because you need it? It's not like you're going to the hardware store to buy a tool because your car broke down and you need to get to work today. If you're going to buy a gun to hunt, then you'll know more than ten days ahead.

Understandable, sure, but why go through it if you don't have to?
There have been several times when I bought a new gun and wanted to try it out less than 10 days later.
(On a more political note, I wonder what percentage of crimes using firearms were committed with guns that were legally purchased less than 10 days before the crime... I'm guessing it's pretty low, and that the 'buy a gun today, shoot somebody tomorrow' scenario is actually pretty rare.)
Quote:

And the hunting class isn't that bad or that expensive. It teaches you basic hunting safety so that you don't pull a Dick Cheney on someone.

Yeah, I guess this could be important, especially in places with more people in them.
In this area, there's enough forest per person that it would be extremely unlikely to see another person out there... In all my cross-country hiking, I've never met anybody else out in the woods... But in a more populated area, it would be more likely.
I wonder if they would exempt veterans, as already having adequate firearms training...

deanhills wrote:
How about earthquakes in California, an economy that is bankrupt and may have an effect on funding and development of schools? The possibility of an earthquake however would really be off putting to me especially if I would bring my horse with me.

*quizzical look*
How could an earthquake possibly hurt a horse in the open field, as mine usually is?
I'd be more worried about my own safety in that regard.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
How could an earthquake possibly hurt a horse in the open field, as mine usually is?
I'd be more worried about my own safety in that regard.
OK. I am not an expert on horses, but I thought a horse would panic, stampede and may be lost to you? Don't animals tend to get nervous when the earth is vibrating even with minor tremors? They're sort of more channelled into natural disasters than we are?
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
How could an earthquake possibly hurt a horse in the open field, as mine usually is?
I'd be more worried about my own safety in that regard.
OK. I am not an expert on horses, but I thought a horse would panic, stampede and may be lost to you? Don't animals tend to get nervous when the earth is vibrating even with minor tremors? They're sort of more channelled into natural disasters than we are?

Well, yes, but they generally don't hurt themselves when running.
They wouldn't survive very well in the wild if they did.
Afaceinthematrix
^^Earthquakes won't bother horses. Earthquakes are really only dangerous for people who are in buildings. A lot of people in California have horses. And you mentioned that budget crisis and schools. Well that won't really affect him since he has a scholarship and budget cuts will basically just raise tuition. Believe me, we're getting screwed right now in that aspect in the U.C. system...

But after some consideration, I would actually suggest somewhere in Washington. I would suggest Utah as it has some very nice places, but it has a lot of jerks there (in some places you're treated like crap if you're not a Mormon - and trust me, they can tell!). So I'd actually go with Washington.

Washington has nice schools, large towns, and really nice areas. Plus, it borders Canada. And to be honest, for the most part, Canada is much nicer than the U.S. as far as outdoors go. So, since you're interested in that, at least live in a place that is near Canada (so you have something to do during school breaks) since you cannot live in Canada.

Actually, on second thought, Montana is even nicer. Montana has some of the nicest places in the world plus it borders Canada so you can still get there very easily. Out of the schools there, I would go to the University of Montana. But I'll leave that section of research for you.

And as a side note, I'll tell a little story of something that happened one time in Montana:

I was driving through an extremely rural town in the middle of nowhere. I pulled over at a little hole-in-the-wall store to pick up a beer. I saw a beer called "Bitch Creek" and I thought it sounded interesting... So I bought it... Word of advice: never buy that beer. It was the most disgusting beer of all time. I would have just dumped it out except that it would have broken the most important rule of beer drinking: never throw beer away.
deanhills
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
^^Earthquakes won't bother horses. Earthquakes are really only dangerous for people who are in buildings. A lot of people in California have horses. And you mentioned that budget crisis and schools. Well that won't really affect him since he has a scholarship and budget cuts will basically just raise tuition. Believe me, we're getting screwed right now in that aspect in the U.C. system...
Thanks for the intel. I'm obviously not an expert on horses With regard to the budget crisis that is exactly what I meant. It will become more expensive, but also, it may affect the quality of teaching as well.
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
^^But after some consideration, I would actually suggest somewhere in Washington. I would suggest Utah as it has some very nice places, but it has a lot of jerks there (in some places you're treated like crap if you're not a Mormon - and trust me, they can tell!). So I'd actually go with Washington.

Washington has nice schools, large towns, and really nice areas. Plus, it borders Canada. And to be honest, for the most part, Canada is much nicer than the U.S. as far as outdoors go. So, since you're interested in that, at least live in a place that is near Canada (so you have something to do during school breaks) since you cannot live in Canada.
That is why Ocalhoun's No. 1 rated place so far Coeur d'Aline is so great. It's on the border with Washington State, and also close to all the places you mentioned, including Canada. It is 33 miles from Spokane, 312 miles from Seattle, Washington, 288 miles from Kelowna, BC, 404 miles from Calgary, AB and 445 miles from Vancouver, BC.

ocalhoun
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
Well that won't really affect him since he has a scholarship and budget cuts will basically just raise tuition.

Well, tuition does affect me, actually.
My scholarship has a dollar amount cap... The less I spend out of it, the longer I can live off of it, and the longer I can go to school.
(After the school runs out, I'll be getting a (low paying) job that I enjoy (horse training preferably), homesteading on cheap land, - living off of it, or simply living a homeless, nomadic lifestyle. Haven't decided which yet, but I've got plenty of time to choose.
Pretty much already decided to ditch the lifestyle of going to a daily grind job I don't like, no matter how well it pays. No more wage 'slavery' for me.)
Quote:

But after some consideration, I would actually suggest somewhere in Washington.

...hm... all the places in Washington have been bumped off of the top 5 list...
Still have Klamath falls Oregon though.
And both Coeur D'Alene ID and Butte MT also have good access to Canada... (As Deanhills pointed out.)
Quote:
I would suggest Utah as it has some very nice places, but it has a lot of jerks there (in some places you're treated like crap if you're not a Mormon - and trust me, they can tell!).

Besides the Mormons, isn't Utah awfully dry? Almost desert-like?
Quote:

Washington has nice schools, large towns, and really nice areas. Plus, it borders Canada. And to be honest, for the most part, Canada is much nicer than the U.S. as far as outdoors go. So, since you're interested in that, at least live in a place that is near Canada (so you have something to do during school breaks) since you cannot live in Canada.

Is it really that much better than nearby regions in the US? I mean... I figure that the North Idaho Rockies are pretty similar to the Canadian Rockies...
Quote:

Actually, on second thought, Montana is even nicer. Montana has some of the nicest places in the world plus it borders Canada so you can still get there very easily. Out of the schools there, I would go to the University of Montana. But I'll leave that section of research for you.

Didn't you notice? Butte MT is on the top 5 list; that's where Montana Tech is located. ^.^
So yeah, I'm already researching it... Expecting 'more information' (ie. ads mixed with information) in the mail from Montana Tech any day now.
My only real concerns for that area:
1- No community college/trade school to back up Montana Tech. (No place to go for quick learning of more practical skills.) Though the fact that Montana Tech has a mechanical engineering program with welding specialty helps that a lot.
2- From what I could tell, housing was a little hard to come by. Not expensive, just hard to find.
3- The area was badly polluted by the Anaconda mining company... Might require extra care in choosing horse pasture, and might mean local streams and rivers are not safely drinkable.
Quote:

And as a side note, I'll tell a little story of something that happened one time in Montana:

I was driving through an extremely rural town in the middle of nowhere. I pulled over at a little hole-in-the-wall store to pick up a beer. I saw a beer called "Bitch Creek" and I thought it sounded interesting... So I bought it... Word of advice: never buy that beer. It was the most disgusting beer of all time. I would have just dumped it out except that it would have broken the most important rule of beer drinking: never throw beer away.

^.^ Haven't been in Montana, but I have been to similar places in Wyoming... (and South Dakota, for that matter.)
I didn't buy anything other than gas though.
(And good thing I didn't need premium (like my 'new' car does) - they only had regular and diesel!)
Afaceinthematrix
ocalhoun wrote:

Well, tuition does affect me, actually.
My scholarship has a dollar amount cap... The less I spend out of it, the longer I can live off of it, and the longer I can go to school.
(After the school runs out, I'll be getting a (low paying) job that I enjoy (horse training preferably), homesteading on cheap land, - living off of it, or simply living a homeless, nomadic lifestyle. Haven't decided which yet, but I've got plenty of time to choose.
Pretty much already decided to ditch the lifestyle of going to a daily grind job I don't like, no matter how well it pays. No more wage 'slavery' for me.)


I figured that much. But the fact of the matter is that you're getting a huge chunk of money for education and so you shouldn't be frugal with it; get the best education you can get since money is given to you. If an expensive school is offering you the best education, then go with it. Also keep in mind that if you go to a private school then you're more likely to be given additional scholarships by the actual school.

Quote:

Besides the Mormons, isn't Utah awfully dry? Almost desert-like?


LoL. To me that sounds like asking, "Isn't all of Los Angeles wealthy? Beverly Hills?" You have to remember that Los Angeles also has Compton.

Utah borders Arizona on the South (which basically is a giant desert) but on the North borders Idaho and Wyoming - two states you were considering! Terrain doesn't magically change at borders. It is usually either gradual or by a huge landmark (mountain range, large body of water, etc.). Utah is actually very forested in areas to the North. Utah is also world reknown for skiing. They have incredible snow. And, like I said, they do have a lot of forest:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wasatch-Cache_National_Forest
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uinta_National_Forest
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dixie_National_Forest
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caribou-Targhee_National_Forest
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashley_National_Forest

The places that you're thinking of, such as Zion and Bryce, are at the very, very south of the state. For instance, I'm going to Utah this summer to do the world famous Narrows (voted number five in National Geographic's America's Best 100 Adventures, and is in almost any list of best hikes in the world... Basically, it's a huge slot canyon about a kilometer high in which the Virgin river runs through and you have to actually hike in the river and swim parts of it... It usually takes two days to complete). The Narrows are in Zion. From where I'm at (near Los Angeles), I have to hop on the 15 freeway. That takes me through Vegas, into Arizona, and then into Utah. Almost instantly after getting into Utah, I'm there... That's where Zion and Bryce are at... But it's almost still Arizona! Head a little farther North...

Quote:

Is it really that much better than nearby regions in the US? I mean... I figure that the North Idaho Rockies are pretty similar to the Canadian Rockies...


I actually wouldn't know; I've never been to the Canadian Rockies. But I've traveled extensively around the U.S. (and have been in the Montana and Wyoming Rockies for more than a week on a 75 mile trek) and have been on an almost 100 mile trek through some Canadian forest. And I can tell you, from experience, that I was more impressed with the Canadian wilderness than any U.S. wilderness that I've been. It was so much more vast, remote, and wild. And that was my impression from a mere 2 weeks! I've spent months in wilderness all over the U.S. and have never been as impressed. The U.S. has some incredible places (like our Rockies), but I personally loved Canada more for various reasons... Although, like I said, I cannot comment on their Rockies because I wasn't there. I was in flat lowland forest...

Quote:

Didn't you notice? Butte MT is on the top 5 list; that's where Montana Tech is located. ^.^
So yeah, I'm already researching it... Expecting 'more information' (ie. ads mixed with information) in the mail from Montana Tech any day now.
My only real concerns for that area:
1- No community college/trade school to back up Montana Tech. (No place to go for quick learning of more practical skills.) Though the fact that Montana Tech has a mechanical engineering program with welding specialty helps that a lot.
2- From what I could tell, housing was a little hard to come by. Not expensive, just hard to find.
3- The area was badly polluted by the Anaconda mining company... Might require extra care in choosing horse pasture, and might mean local streams and rivers are not safely drinkable.


Yes, I did notice. But you asked for advice and so I told you that I would choose Montana based on what I know you want... The fact that you already had it on your choices seemed like a good enough reason to comment on it. That is what you wanted, right?

And that might make it difficult for your horses - I wouldn't know; I don't have anything to do with horses. And drinking water directly from streams isn't a good idea anyways (although I had no problems doing it in Canada and in some places in the U.S.). Just get a small water filter that weighs practically nothing and your covered...
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
Besides the Mormons, isn't Utah awfully dry? Almost desert-like?
It would not be my choice either from a cultural point of view, but whenever I was travelling with my Delta Airpass, I made Saltlake City my hub as the cost of living is very low, transportation excellent, every service I used was impeccable and of the highest standard. But the culture was all over so I don't think I would ever want to settle there for a long time. The culture is probably responsible for a very neat, well organized and clean city (there were no hobos/street people), but I'd rather have a little of dirt and chaos and freedom, than having to live in a dominating culture like that.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
Pretty much already decided to ditch the lifestyle of going to a daily grind job I don't like, no matter how well it pays. No more wage 'slavery' for me.)

Ocalhoun, I was thinking of you tonight when I saw this ad in my inbox regarding house sitting. This could have suited a nomadic type lifestyle:
Quote:
User Name mystified
Date Posted or Renewed: Feb 23,2011
From: Oct 1,2011
Period Housesit is available: winter months Medium Long Term
Province: Alberta Country:
County/District: Lac Ste Anne
City: Stony Plain

City/Town Area: acreage 16 km north of Stony, 50 km west of Edmonton
Description
House Sitter Requirements:

Pet/Animal care - 2 inside dogs (JRTs), 2
outside cats, 8 pastured horses requiring twice
daily feeding


Rural house - large acreage, large shop/garage
trails, solitude,

Garden tractors, one with attached snowblower
for winters, small quad, many other tools
available

Edmonton is an easy drive, as are St. Albert,
Stony Plain and Spruce Grove. Groceries and
amenities are easily available but require a car.

Breed/s: Jack Russell terriers (well trained and quiet), outside cats, gaited horses (Tennessee Walkers, Rocky Mountain Horses
I of course can't provide the source directly but all of this is available from http://www.housecarers.com if you should be interested to investigate. Would be a great way to travel the world one day, as it is international.
Very Happy
ocalhoun
Afaceinthematrix wrote:

I figured that much. But the fact of the matter is that you're getting a huge chunk of money for education and so you shouldn't be frugal with it; get the best education you can get since money is given to you.

Don't be frugal, okay.
But I'm not going to be wasteful either. If I stretch out the money some, it will allow me to get more specialties under my belt.
Quote:

Quote:

Besides the Mormons, isn't Utah awfully dry? Almost desert-like?


LoL. To me that sounds like asking, "Isn't all of Los Angeles wealthy? Beverly Hills?" You have to remember that Los Angeles also has Compton.

Yeah, I was pretty much basing that off of a stereotype.
Quote:

Yes, I did notice. But you asked for advice and so I told you that I would choose Montana based on what I know you want... The fact that you already had it on your choices seemed like a good enough reason to comment on it. That is what you wanted, right?

True, true. It just seemed that you were mentioning it as if I hadn't thought of it before.


deanhills wrote:
I of course can't provide the source directly but all of this is available from http://www.housecarers.com if you should be interested to investigate. Would be a great way to travel the world one day, as it is international.
Very Happy

Sounds interesting...
deanhills
I'm curious, have you managed to make a decision yet about which University to attend, have you enrolled yet?
Very Happy
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
I'm curious, have you managed to make a decision yet about which University to attend, have you enrolled yet?

Why, yes I have.


Gonzaga University in Washington State. (Right across the border from Couer D'Alene.)
What really made my decision there was I found a place to rent for just $100/mo, plus helping out with their horse breeding farm some. And they said they'd teach me the finer points of horse training. ^.^
And, of course there's room for my horse(s)*, since they have a 50 acre ranch.

So, I get to learn mechanical engineering and horse training at the same time, and I get around $1000/mo housing allowance, while paying out only $100/mo for housing.
Sounds like a good deal for me!


*With enough extra room, I'm thinking about getting another horse. An older, more experience trail horse, preferably... The kind they refer to as 'bombproof'. That way, if I want to invite somebody to go on a ride with me, I'll have a good horse for an inexperienced rider.
Afaceinthematrix
Interesting that you choose a Catholic university. I am not sure how well their engineering department is but I know (from doing the research) that their mathematics department is a joke compared to many other universities.

But Washington is very nice. I love the Olympic Peninsula where you can go camping in the only rainforest in the continental United States.
ocalhoun
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
Interesting that you choose a Catholic university.

Yes, I find that odd myself, actually.
They are the best school in the area though, and I made sure to check that they don't force a catholic worldview on students. It looks like they encourage it, but they don't force it.
And, really, aside from the religious aspect, I can actually agree with some Jesuit philosophy.
Quote:
I am not sure how well their engineering department is but I know (from doing the research) that their mathematics department is a joke compared to many other universities.

Yeah, I wouldn't go there for pure mathematics. They are particularly famed for their law school, but from looking at it, their engineering department seems pretty good as well.
Quote:

But Washington is very nice. I love the Olympic Peninsula where you can go camping in the only rainforest in the continental United States.

Kinda far from Olympic though... The school is on the far Eastern edge of Washington. There are some great mountains and regular forests nearby though, which was one of my main requirements for a place to live.
The coast would still be close enough to go to on a long weekend or spring break or something though.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
deanhills wrote:
I'm curious, have you managed to make a decision yet about which University to attend, have you enrolled yet?

Why, yes I have.


Gonzaga University in Washington State. (Right across the border from Couer D'Alene.)
What really made my decision there was I found a place to rent for just $100/mo, plus helping out with their horse breeding farm some. And they said they'd teach me the finer points of horse training. ^.^
And, of course there's room for my horse(s)*, since they have a 50 acre ranch.

So, I get to learn mechanical engineering and horse training at the same time, and I get around $1000/mo housing allowance, while paying out only $100/mo for housing.
Sounds like a good deal for me!


*With enough extra room, I'm thinking about getting another horse. An older, more experience trail horse, preferably... The kind they refer to as 'bombproof'. That way, if I want to invite somebody to go on a ride with me, I'll have a good horse for an inexperienced rider.

Sounds pretty awesome Ocalhoun .... well done! Do you know the people on the horse breeding farm, or did you travel down there to find them?

Mechanical engineering sounds pretty awesome. Do you know what you are going to specialize in once you have completed your degree, or did you deliberately choose an engineering discipline that is as horizontal as possible so you have many options to choose from?
Very Happy
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:

Sounds pretty awesome Ocalhoun .... well done! Do you know the people on the horse breeding farm, or did you travel down there to find them?

Mechanical engineering sounds pretty awesome. Do you know what you are going to specialize in once you have completed your degree, or did you deliberately choose an engineering discipline that is as horizontal as possible so you have many options to choose from?
Very Happy

The second choice, for both questions.

Well, actually, for the second question, I chose the degree partly for that, but also partly because it was something I wanted to learn and didn't already know a lot about.
Future career options were not much of a deciding factor, actually, because I don't particularly care about a career. If I'm able to, after graduating, I'll work as a professional horse trainer, and only use the knowledge from all this schooling occasionally for various hobbies.



...Though, if I were forced to choose a specialty, I would enjoy getting into firearms design. The designs can be very simple, yet extremely thoroughly thought-out at the same time... and heck, you can even make quite a name for yourself pretty easily if you make a design that becomes popular... just ask Samuel Colt, Sergei Mosin, Mikhail Kalasnikov, John Browning, et cetera.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:

...Though, if I were forced to choose a specialty, I would enjoy getting into firearms design. The designs can be very simple, yet extremely thoroughly thought-out at the same time... and heck, you can even make quite a name for yourself pretty easily if you make a design that becomes popular... just ask Samuel Colt, Sergei Mosin, Mikhail Kalasnikov, John Browning, et cetera.
So we could look forward to seeing Ocalhoun gun designs one day? Very Happy

Sounds great that you're not thinking career, but a life with lots of learning in it. Helping with horse breeding is probably going to be an awesome experience. Hope you will still have time to post at Frihost?
Very Happy
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:

...Though, if I were forced to choose a specialty, I would enjoy getting into firearms design. The designs can be very simple, yet extremely thoroughly thought-out at the same time... and heck, you can even make quite a name for yourself pretty easily if you make a design that becomes popular... just ask Samuel Colt, Sergei Mosin, Mikhail Kalasnikov, John Browning, et cetera.
So we could look forward to seeing Ocalhoun gun designs one day? Very Happy

Maybe... maybe not. I wouldn't consider it particularly likely.
Quote:

Sounds great that you're not thinking career, but a life with lots of learning in it. Helping with horse breeding is probably going to be an awesome experience.

Going to be so awesome!

Quote:
Hope you will still have time to post at Frihost?
Very Happy

Of course!
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
Quote:
Hope you will still have time to post at Frihost?
Very Happy

Of course!


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