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What's your role in global warming?





baboosaa
When you come from your college to your apartment then you burn some fossil fuel. Now multiply it with half of the total population. You will get what they say-fuel used all over the world in average by a student. Now what if I say what you do has very little part in global warming. Long breathe. The green house gases what they say do comes from vehicles but they do more come from industries. Industries emits huge amount of green house gases.
Ankhanu
Are you suggesting that the accumulation of small sources is unimportant because there are large sources?
Sorry, but a small seep, over time, and if in sufficient number, can have a great impact.

Yeah, a single individual's impact is small, but the accumulated impact of thousands of individuals can be quite great. Every little reduction is a step in the right direction.

"Every journey begins with a single step", yadda yadda yadda.
standready
Ankhanu wrote:
Yeah, a single individual's impact is small, but the accumulated impact of thousands of individuals can be quite great. Every little reduction is a step in the right direction.

Well said, Ankhanu!
harrygail1987
Really its a big problem for our further life. And It is not really an issue whether our climate has changed.
Global Warming effects:-
Spread of disease
Warmer waters and more hurricanes
its help to increased probability and intensity of droughts and heat waves.
Economic consequences
Polar ice caps melting
ocalhoun
harrygail1987 wrote:
And It is not really an issue whether our climate has changed.
Global Warming effects:-

Yes, it is an issue, because if it hasn't, then all your effects are irrelevant, since they won't happen.
LittleBlackKitten
I don't really believe in this whole "Global Warming" business. It's coming off as histrionic, when a temperature shift both up and down happen on earth all the time in pattern, and it's nothing new. It's just following a global pattern that's been happening from the start, and it will go away then get colder again in the next 100 years. Now, of course, there are people who are pushing the "green" thing to save the environment, and people who do extra things to help the environment. Awesome! Keep it up. We should be doing this ANYWAY, not just in the face of a supposed global disaster that's supposed to destroy life as we know it...

Of course, there is that one verse in Revelation that says 1/3 of birds of the air will die, 1/3 of the beasts of the field, 2/3 of mankind, 2/3 of the forests and marineside land and islands, storms will be more frequent and worse before Christ's return; so maybe it will happen. Either way, life is going to get tough and expensive.

So I guess my answer to what my role is? It's about like everyone else. If I can afford green and it's good quality, I will do it simply because it's the more responsible choice. But, will I make an obsessive compulsive habit of trying to undo my supposed carbon footprint? No. Because, if it is written, it will happen. If it doesn't, oh well. I can't really stop the tide from turning, so why try?
Bikerman
What is your evidence for this 100 year cycle?
Global temperature does not, to my knowledge, follow any such short term patterns.
There is a 21,000 year cycle - the ice-age/interglacial cycle - which is probably a result of the Milankovitch cycle (to do with distance from the sun and 'wobble' about the axis).

We can recreate the global temperature reasonably accurately over the last few centuries using a variety of proxy measurements:
LittleBlackKitten
I KNEW you'd post after me arguing about something or other. Are you stalking my posts, Chris? Razz
Ankhanu
He just beat me to it. Razz
Do you have an answer?
LittleBlackKitten
http://whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/globalwarming.html
ocalhoun
LittleBlackKitten wrote:

Of course, there is that one verse in Revelation that says 1/3 of birds of the air will die, 1/3 of the beasts of the field, 2/3 of mankind, 2/3 of the forests and marineside land and islands, storms will be more frequent and worse before Christ's return; so maybe it will happen. Either way, life is going to get tough and expensive.

So I guess my answer to what my role is? It's about like everyone else. If I can afford green and it's good quality, I will do it simply because it's the more responsible choice. But, will I make an obsessive compulsive habit of trying to undo my supposed carbon footprint? No. Because, if it is written, it will happen. If it doesn't, oh well. I can't really stop the tide from turning, so why try?


Biblical predictions... Fatalism...

In a science forum?

I maintain a healthy level of skepticism about global warming... but, really? Equating it with Biblical end-times predictions?
Ankhanu
LittleBlackKitten wrote:
http://whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/globalwarming.html


That site reeks of misinformation.
menino
I agree with Bikerman where Global Warming is natural, in that it has been happening over the last 20,000 years (or much more) or so.
But also I have to agree with the rest regarding the greenhouse gases which are caused by us.
We do leave a carbon footprint, and we cannot eliminate it, but we can be responsible for it, and do our part, to minimise our effect on the world, if not for ourselves, then at least for generations to come.
Since vehicles and industries are the ones that produce carbon related smoke, its up to them, and science to better ways of minimizing carbon emmissions.
Bikerman
Ankhanu wrote:
LittleBlackKitten wrote:
http://whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/globalwarming.html


That site reeks of misinformation.

It stinks.
Look at the first graph as an example. They have simply foreshortened the time axis to select a relatively stable period within the overall trend. This is a common tactic amongst the nay-sayers and is, of course, entirely dishonest.

The whole thesis on the site is that CO2 and temperature should be tightly correlated and because they are not this shows that there is no anthropic effect. Aside from being very spurious logic, it is simply wrong. CO2 correlates very well with temperature - they have just used too fine a scale to plot the correlation. This is another trick that the nay-sayers like to pull - actually another examle of the first dishonesty - deliberately selecting timescales in a misleading way.
Look at the graph on a more meaningful scale and you get:

That's a pretty tight correlation.
Of course it is not a simple linear correlation - the atmosphere is extremely complex and there are lots of small timescale complicating factors such as el-nino, la-nino, the atlantic oscillation and so on. Any graph which tries to show a temperature trend on a timescale of less than 3 or 4 decades is going to magnify these periodic factors and give a very misleading picture.
Bikerman
LittleBlackKitten wrote:
I KNEW you'd post after me arguing about something or other. Are you stalking my posts, Chris? Razz

Certainly not. You will find that I nearly always respond to contentious (or interesting) points on the science forums. That is largely because I am the 'main' moderator here, so I take a special interest in the content.
ocalhoun
Bikerman wrote:

It stinks.
Look at the first graph as an example. They have simply foreshortened the time axis to select a relatively stable period within the overall trend. This is a common tactic amongst the nay-sayers and is, of course, entirely dishonest.

Been known to be used by the other side as well, from time to time. ^.^


As for the ice-core graph, I had some argument... but I forgot about it. Had something to do with correlation and causation though, I'm pretty sure.

(What particularly interests me about that graph though, are the down-swings... What causes them?)
milkshake01
Using electricity. My opinion is that polluting the environment to some extent is inevitable.
zaxacongrejo
My role is mostly like almost everyone, i do not care enough and I’m part of the problem I belive that we are plage that ultimately will end up with no habitable planet
But i do the usual one can do, “to save the planet” or the wallet.
But there are a couple of things I believe that we all can do that will improve our wallet the world economy and the planet heath, which are:

-Use always rechargeable batteries

-Try to replace all lamps you have at home for led lamps, (I’ve been using 8w led lamps to replace old fluorescent lamps, considering that this is the second time i do it because i did at 15 years ago to replace old incandescent lamps I’ve passed from 60W incandescent lamps to 8W considering that the average houses have at least 10 lamps replacing them if they are 60W incandescent can represent a 420w saving hour, and guess what i still have 15 years old fluorescent lamps working at 100% Philips branded, so led lamps will last much more

-unplug all standby stuff you can have at your home

-make sure all windows and doors are watertight and airtight this is valid to winter and summer

-service contracts that give you night savings in my case from 10pm to 8am I only pay 50% per kW
So all stuff that uses more power and that I can pass to night utilization I do such as bread machine , cloths washing machine , cloths drying machine etc.

-if you have night savings contracts replace gas water cooling to electrical/sun cooling it doesn’t need much sun in my country even in winter we face more problems with over eating them cold

-replace all old TVs and computer screens by led TVs and computer screens old TVs. in average for medium size old TVs uses 200W a led TV will only use 40W

-freezers are also cause a lot of damage to our planet in 2 ways cfcs and power consumption
After a couple of years like 10 or more wasting energy with my freezer I learned that it should be tilted
I way that gravity energy forces the doors against the freezer ,also that we should always start adjusting temps at the inside starting from 1 not from 6 like i did lol ending up with 10 or more years using my freezer at 5 when just 1 is more them enough, wasting a lot of energy and money
Saying so my role is not the best I wish I know how to power an entire house with a Nano steam turbine do you know anything about this?
stanloplato
Quote:
The future is not somewhere we are going. It is something we are creating. Every day we do things that make some futures more probable and others less likely.

Reducing your carbon and greenhouse gas emissions will not only make your lifestyle more sustainable, but also save you money. Even if you remain a cynic and disagree with the consensus of scientists, you will benefit from reduced pollution, a more healthful lifestyle, and increased savings. This article outlines some ways that you can act to help prevent the Earth from warming further. While humankind has the ability to destroy the planet, we can also help protect and sustain it.

Steps

1
Challenge others about global warming. A great way to broaden your own impact is to rally other people to your cause. The more facts that you have, as to what mainstream science says about it, the more you can persuade people to make simple yet effective changes in daily behavior. Energy-saving techniques either are initially expensive (for example, solar power) or take extra time (for example, recycling), so many people need to be convinced that their efforts matter. Always keep in mind that you are aiming to demonstrate the benefits of these activities and highlight how each person can play a vital role in helping to reduce global warming. Remember that "civil society does not respond at all well to moralistic scolding," so use education to enlighten, not frighten.

Make sure you are well informed about global warming. Global warming is occurring more rapidly than it was originally expected to -- only forty years ago, the big worry was global cooling. Global warming already disrupts millions of lives daily in the forms of destructive weather patterns and loss of habitat. What is already happening is only the tip of the melting iceberg, for it is our children and grandchildren who may suffer most from the effects of global warming. Hundreds of millions of people may be exposed to famine, water shortages, extreme weather conditions and a 20 - 30% loss of animal and plant species if we do not reduce the rate of global warming and reduce GHG emissions. On the other hand, having warmer winters means longer growing seasons in temperate and subarctic climes, sometimes allowing an additional crop to be planted and harvested each year, or simply making the existing crops more productive. Having both sides of the story will make you a better spokesperson for your cause.
2
Vote and influence your government with telephone calls, e-mails, letters, and meetings with those who represent you in government. Learn as much as possible about the policies that you advocate before doing so; solving one problem often creates others. For example, replacing incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs has increased the hazard of mercury contamination in homes and landfills. Fluorescent light bulbs are still preferable to incandescent bulbs (see below), but one must be careful to recycle them and to not break them, if not mercury would be released. The push to grow corn for ethanol has contributed to higher food prices while saving little energy, if any at all.

3
Choose vegetarian or vegan meals. Livestock are responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than transportation is. This is due to the large amounts of petroleum used in creating ammonium nitrate fertilizer (for the corn that they are fed) plus the cost of shipping that corn to the cattle and then shipping the cattle to slaughter and grocery. If one eats meat it should always be from a local source. Choosing vegetarian foods also drastically reduces agricultural water consumption and land use, and favorably impacts biodiversity. Vegetarian diets have been shown to promote good health and in most developed countries, eliminating meat from one's diet is as easy as making responsible choices at stores and restaurants. Other factors such as the means of production and distance that food travels are also factors in the total impact of our food choices.

4
Recycle more by using recycling bins, composting, etc. Encourage neighbors, supervisors, colleagues, and businesses to do likewise (15-25% of people do not recycle).

5
Use compact fluorescent or LED bulbs. Replace three frequently used light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs and save 300 lbs. of carbon dioxide and US$60 per year. A standard compact fluorescent bulb will save around one third of a tonne of greenhouse gas, along with the cost of six or more incandescent globes. Remember that CFL bulbs do contain small amounts of toxic mercury. Therefore, proper disposal (recycling) is necessary to prevent any additional landfill contamination. You can also start looking into LED lightbulbs which have started to crop up recently -- they are even more efficient, longer lasting, and do not contain mercury! Consider substituting as many energy efficient bulbs as you can, and give them as gifts to family and friends. Donate a set to a local charity to refit their office.

6
Fill the dishwasher. Run your dishwasher only with a full load. Save 100 lbs. of carbon dioxide and US$40 per year, or do them by hand with minimal water.

7
Use recycled paper. Make sure that your printer paper is 100% post consumer recycled paper. Save 5 lbs. of carbon dioxide per ream of paper. Decide whether something is really worth printing out. Leave a signature at the bottom of your e-mails reminding the reader to think twice before printing the e-mail. Make the most of scrap paper for shopping lists, notes, scrapbooks, telephone messages, taking notes in class, etc. Recycle your paper only when it has been thoroughly used up!

8
Buy locally made and locally grown products. Buy locally to reduce the energy required to transport your goods. The consumable products that we all purchase represent more than half of the average family's carbon footprint! If you successfully encourage neighbors to do this, store owners will be encouraged to stock local goods. Shop at farmers' markets.

9
Count your carbon. Keep track of your carbon consumption as a way of tracking your progress.



There is a logo called Carbon Counted that companies can put on their products to communicate their carbon footprint. Products that have a low Carbon Counted footprint number give consumers a means by which to influence and reward companies that reduce emissions in the creation of their products.
Use a carbon calculator. These counters enable you to calculate your personal impact by adding up the carbon emissions from your activities. There are counters available for many countries; use your local search engine for results. An international calculator is provided by the World Resources Institute.
Support producers of renewable energy. Help spur the renewable energy market by participating in it. In the UK you can get 100% renewable electricity by switching to a company such as Ecotricity or Good Energy Ltd. Alternatively, you can buy wind certificates, green tags and stock in renewable energy companies. Many of these companies are new and small, and the stock is low in price. While many are high-risk, they may present an opportunity to help the company move beyond the initial stages of uncertainty and to enhance the viability of important, upcoming market niches. These companies may offer opportunities for great returns if they prove profitable; just be sure to do your homework first, as you would when investing in anything.
10
Buy minimally packaged goods. Less packaging could reduce your garbage significantly, saving 1,200 pounds of carbon dioxide and $1,000 per year. If you consider a certain products' packaging to be excessive, mail it to the company with your challenge to the company to reduce its packaging; include suggestions on how if you have ideas. Also tell companies that Wal-Mart thinks that reduced packaging is not only a good idea but also very achievable; this is likely to set the standard for many businesses in the future.

11
Insulate anything that uses energy to stay a different temperature from its environment.



Keep your water heater insulated to save up to 1,000 lbs. of carbon dioxide and US$40 per year. Avoid using units fitted with continuous pilot lights, and you will save AUD$40 and 200 kilograms of greenhouse gas emissions yearly. Also use less hot water. For example, if the shower is too cold, turn down the cold water instead of turning up the hot water.
Be energy wise and insulate your entire home to keep down the heating and cooling costs. If your insulation is old or inefficient, do yourself a favor and replace it; not only will it reduce your output of emissions but it will also reduce your energy bills considerably. Consider the attic, crawlspaces, basement, walls and ceiling. If you have awkward spaces, be aware that cellulose or fiberglass insulation can be blown in by a professional contractor.
Weather strip your home. Caulk and weather strip your doorways, windows and air conditioners. Save 1,700 lbs. of carbon dioxide and US$274 per year. You will discover that the costs of caulking are far outweighed by savings in fuel costs and increased comfort level.


12
Replace old appliances and reduce reliance on them.

Inefficient appliances (such as refrigerators, washing machines and air conditioners) waste energy. Save hundreds of pounds of carbon dioxide and hundreds of dollars per year by replacing them (and having your old appliance recycled or disposed of properly). Many countries have "energy star" ratings on new appliances that allow you to assess the energy usage of the appliance. Check online before you go shopping to save time or at least check the seals on your fridge or freezer and replace them if they show signs of wear.
While you're at it, reassess appliances that you really do not need to use, such as plug-in air fresheners. Try opening the windows instead (and throwing out that rotting fruit bowl) and replace with natural air freshener alternatives. Other items include the many so-called time-saving devices in your kitchen.
13
Use a push mower to mow the lawn. Use your muscles instead of fossil fuels and get some strength-building exercise. Save 80 lbs of carbon dioxide per year.

14
Unplug unused electronics. Even when electronic devices are turned off, they use energy. Save over 1,000 lbs of carbon dioxide and US$256 per year by unplugging them or switching them off at the wall using a power surge-protector (sometimes called a power center). Get into the habit of switching the power off before you go to bed.

15
Grow fast growing plants.Plants like bamboo grow faster and produce 35% more oxygen than trees like oak or birch, and require fewer chemicals and care. Make sure that the plants are appropriate for your area; prefer native over introduced species and do not plant problem species. Bamboo, for example, can be very invasive in most of the US.

16
Use public transportation. Taking the bus, the train, the subway or other forms of public transportation lessens the load on the roads and reduces one's individual greenhouse gas emissions by an average of 1600 pounds per year. Taking public transport removes the stress of long road commutes and gives you a great opportunity to read, think, and relax. You also save on parking money and time wasted looking for parking spaces.

17
Ride a bicycle. Taking the bike instead of the car is a very simple solution. However, if you experience such problems as lack of suitable bike paths, having to deal with congested traffic or hilly terrain, you are faced with a few challenges. They are, however, challenges that you as an individual can overcome with a little determination.



Ask your local government to make (more) bike trails in your area and to make sure that bicyclists are kept safe from traffic in the same way that pedestrians are afforded this right. Get the local community behind you - a few neighbors, the street, or the whole suburb!
If you have hilly terrain, there are solutions as well. Build up your strength with shorter trips, find alternate routes, or take a bus part way (many municipal buses have bike racks on the front that you can use).
18
Use your vehicle as a tool against global warming. If you can't live without a car, then use it in a way that minimizes global impact.



Buy a hybrid car.' The average driver could save 16,000 lbs. of CO2 and $3,750 per year driving a hybrid. Plug-in hybrids can save even more and one day may be able to give cash back.
Buy a fuel efficient car.Save up to 20,000 lbs. of carbon dioxide per year using a more fuel efficient car - that's a savings of AUD$10,000 over a car's lifetime. Buying fuel efficient cars also encourage companies to continue making and improving them owing to increased demand.
Practice green driving. Save gas and lower stress levels by being a considerate driver. Improve fuel efficiency by removing unused external objects such as roof racks, turning off your engine instead of idling for long periods of time (over 1 minute), and removing loads from the trunk/boot that are not necessary.
Keep your car tires adequately inflated. Under-inflated tires can reduce fuel economy by up to 3% and are subject to increased wear and tear. Check them monthly. Save 250 lbs. of carbon dioxide and US$840 per year. A good gift is a tire air-pressure gauge as it not only saves money but makes driving safer.
Change your air filter. Check your car's air filter monthly. Save 800 pounds of carbon dioxide and US$130 per year. Cleaning your air filter improves your mileage and reduces pollution because it makes it easier for your car to take in air and maintain a proper fuel/air mixture.
19
Use refills. Try using refills instead of buying new jars or bottles each time. This reduces your consumption and is usually cheaper, too.


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- Ankhanu
Klaw 2
stanloplato wrote:


Make sure you are well informed about global warming. Global warming is occurring more rapidly than it was originally expected to -- only forty years ago, the big worry was global cooling.

Actually not it was unsure whether there was global warming or dimming. There never was a consensus supporting dimming…

stanloplato wrote:
5
Use compact fluorescent or LED bulbs. Replace three frequently used light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs and save 300 lbs. of carbon dioxide and US$60 per year. A standard compact fluorescent bulb will save around one third of a tonne of greenhouse gas, along with the cost of six or more incandescent globes. Remember that CFL bulbs do contain small amounts of toxic mercury. Therefore, proper disposal (recycling) is necessary to prevent any additional landfill contamination. You can also start looking into LED lightbulbs which have started to crop up recently -- they are even more efficient, longer lasting, and do not contain mercury! Consider substituting as many energy efficient bulbs as you can, and give them as gifts to family and friends. Donate a set to a local charity to refit their office.

Actually LED bulbs aren’t that eco friendly first off;
Generally you use your lights mostly when your heating is on, where I live on average number of days the heating is on for 215… the “waste” heat produced by the lights doesn’t have to be produced by the hating then (though it’s possible that the efficiency of the heating is higher).
So the LED bulbs save less…
2nd The cos phi or power factor of a LED is terrible even if it has compensation built into it’s still terrible. Power factor 1 is good the lower it gets the worse it is…
To spare everyone the boring details if you have a bad power factor there’s a current that you do need to produce and your cables have to thick enough to handle but you don’t use it in your appliance…
The problem is most sites don’t mention this since it doesn’t cost you any money however the environmental effects aren’t accurate…
stanloplato wrote:
7
Use recycled paper. Make sure that your printer paper is 100% post consumer recycled paper. Save 5 lbs. of carbon dioxide per ream of paper. Decide whether something is really worth printing out. Leave a signature at the bottom of your e-mails reminding the reader to think twice before printing the e-mail. Make the most of scrap paper for shopping lists, notes, scrapbooks, telephone messages, taking notes in class, etc. Recycle your paper only when it has been thoroughly used up!

Actually not all paper recycling isn’t that good. To make new white paper you need to bleach the paper and those chemicals aren’t good for the environment. CO2 isn’t the only problem it’s better for recycled paper to be used in other products like cartons…
spinout
My role is easy - the Swedes are the cleanest! I am a goodguy to nature!

well if the USA and the China nations not signing the papers of a new environment unionship - why should we focus on little people? We must first focus on the nations to unite!
Ankhanu
spinout wrote:
My role is easy - the Swedes are the cleanest! I am a goodguy to nature!

well if the USA and the China nations not signing the papers of a new environment unionship - why should we focus on little people? We must first focus on the nations to unite!

The role of the individual is small, but important. There is NO reason to ignore that while pursuing national and corporate level change... They can nicely operate in parallel.
spinout
HM, how do we influence USA and China to sign on???
BigGeek
ocalhoun wrote:

(What particularly interests me about that graph though, are the down-swings... What causes them?)


I guess I'm reversed from you, from the looks of the graph the present high does not appear to be any higher than past spikes. At present we can contribute the spike to mankind's influence, but what about the past, obviously man was not the contributing factor.

I've read numerous theories before like rise in CO2 levels correlated to more active volcanic times in the earth's past. Another article I read correlated it to the rise in sea levels, and yet another article correlated increased volcanic activity and more mid ocean ridges to higher sea levels and higher CO2 levels and increase in temperature. So I've read a variety of theories about what causes the cycle and they all seem plausible to me.

It is graphs like the one Bikerman posted that leads me to think that this is a normal and natural upswing and not completely caused by human pollution.

Now don't get me wrong, I am all for making the changes suggested to help decrease my own financial outlay and limit the pollution I am responsible for. I do feel that we all need to help clean up our environment for the sake of mankind and the rest of the planet, but doing it to prevent global warming seems like a farce. If anything realizing that sure does help take the fanaticism out of any such efforts!!
Bikerman
Q. Has the CO2 level been higher in the past than it is now?
A. Absolutely. WAY higher.
BUT
The mean temp was ALSO way higher, partly as a result.
The Vostok ice cores show the correlation over the last half a million years or so, and it is pretty damn tight.


There is a difference between sceptical questioning (ALWAYS GOOD) and bull-headed, fingers in ears refusal to accept the evidence (ALWAYS BAD). I think we have long moved into the position where 'denial' of either the rise or the anthropogenic influence puts one in the second rather than the first group.

PS - Don't believe the bullshit commonly circulated that because there is a lag (temp comes BEFORE CO2 increase/decrease) that means it is CO2 levels being driven by temp rather than the other way around. In reality the picture is too complex for a simple article, but the lag is both understood and explained (and was actually predicted) and does NOT indicate that the scientists have their causality the wrong way around. I'll happily explain in detail, but it WILL be long and boring and it is easy to google...
spinout
My role as an individual - Overpowered vintage chevy small block with straight exhaust in a vintage car... well a little lie, I got flame protection ... Cool . hm, BSA 650 Lightning with true straight exhaust in addition.

No, that hobby vehicles are not the problem, our daily freight traffic is the concern. It must be a nation concern, and especially for those nations that have no policy at all. I pay too much for gas... I don't pollute with my ordinary vehices, they are the cleanest in the world.
Insanity
Everyone has a role in global warming, even if it's different depending on your lifestyle and where you live. People in developed countries will have a much higher carbon footprint (which can be used to determine how much you contribute to the overall global warming problem) than developing countries. My role would be the transportation I take to go to work and school and classes, as well as all the fuel burned in the production cycle of the things I consume like meat, or clothing, or electornics. Almost everything you use was shipped to you in some form or another, and I think that would be a major component of your role in global warming.
Ankhanu
spinout wrote:
My role as an individual - Overpowered vintage chevy small block with straight exhaust in a vintage car... well a little lie, I got flame protection ... Cool . hm, BSA 650 Lightning with true straight exhaust in addition.

No, that hobby vehicles are not the problem, our daily freight traffic is the concern. It must be a nation concern, and especially for those nations that have no policy at all. I pay too much for gas... I don't pollute with my ordinary vehices, they are the cleanest in the world.

The worst part about this is that you're serious.
Insanity nicely demonstrates some of the individual's role in greenhouse gas emission generation/carbon footprint:

Insanity wrote:
Everyone has a role in global warming, even if it's different depending on your lifestyle and where you live. People in developed countries will have a much higher carbon footprint (which can be used to determine how much you contribute to the overall global warming problem) than developing countries. My role would be the transportation I take to go to work and school and classes, as well as all the fuel burned in the production cycle of the things I consume like meat, or clothing, or electornics. Almost everything you use was shipped to you in some form or another, and I think that would be a major component of your role in global warming.


Yes, climate change is a national level issue... but that's not the only level at which it operates. It's a little like evolution in that regard; it's a process that manifests at a population level, but it acts through individuals, with it's basis in genetics... three levels that function semi-independently to form a whole picture. As such, yes there needs to be nation-level regulation... but at the same time each individual is contributing to the overall picture in every choice they make regarding consumption. The food we eat, where it was produced and processed, how it was shipped and from where, the materials we build our homes with and how large they are, how much electricity we use and how it was generated, the technology we utilize, where it was manufactured and how the resources that went into its manufacture were procured, etc., etc. It's not just directly how much petrol, wood or coal we burn directly, but a culmination of all of our contributions. Once totalled, you get an idea of just how much impact an individual has.

Yeah, you're not driving those freight trucks... but you're the reason they're on the road hauling freight.
Pande
My role is to not contribute to the bigger problem behind why global warming exists - us . Never having my own children, adopting only. It's a philosophy a lot of people think is strange but really, we are at capacity. It is affecting way too many parts of our lives.
BigGeek
Bikerman wrote:
Q. Has the CO2 level been higher in the past than it is now?
A. Absolutely. WAY higher.
BUT
The mean temp was ALSO way higher, partly as a result.
The Vostok ice cores show the correlation over the last half a million years or so, and it is pretty damn tight.


There is a difference between sceptical questioning (ALWAYS GOOD) and bull-headed, fingers in ears refusal to accept the evidence (ALWAYS BAD). I think we have long moved into the position where 'denial' of either the rise or the anthropogenic influence puts one in the second rather than the first group.

PS - Don't believe the bullshit commonly circulated that because there is a lag (temp comes BEFORE CO2 increase/decrease) that means it is CO2 levels being driven by temp rather than the other way around. In reality the picture is too complex for a simple article, but the lag is both understood and explained (and was actually predicted) and does NOT indicate that the scientists have their causality the wrong way around. I'll happily explain in detail, but it WILL be long and boring and it is easy to google...


Well I'm not sure how to take your line about skeptical questioning or sticking a finger in my ear, I am willing to listen to arguments that man's influence is affecting CO2 levels and that higher CO2 levels equates to higher temperatures, however I do question how much influence it actually has on increasing temperatures world wide.
Bikerman
Well, the temp is going up and even during the last decade of apparent temp plateau the extra energy Apparent temp stability 15 rt145.
So presumably you either think the measurements are wrong and temp has not steadily risen over the last century, or you think that something other than CO2 is causing it?
Before I continue,m it is worth pointing out that you are also indirectly calling a whole load of highly skilled and qualified scientist either incompetent or worse.....Worth remembering in these situations and not a fallacy since it iIS an appeal to authority, but to JUSTIFIED and VALID authority. Not conclusive but neither trivial.
BigGeek
My apologies for not replying sooner to this post.

Bikerman wrote:
Well, the temp is going up and even during the last decade of apparent temp plateau the extra energy Apparent temp stability 15 rt145.
So presumably you either think the measurements are wrong and temp has not steadily risen over the last century, or you think that something other than CO2 is causing it?


I'm not sure how I conveyed that I did not think CO2 is causing the increase in temperatures over the last century. Obviously CO2 is the cause for the rise in temperatures now and in the past. This point I am not disputing.

Bikerman wrote:
Before I continue,m it is worth pointing out that you are also indirectly calling a whole load of highly skilled and qualified scientist either incompetent or worse.....Worth remembering in these situations and not a fallacy since it iIS an appeal to authority, but to JUSTIFIED and VALID authority. Not conclusive but neither trivial.


I am not calling a load of highly skilled scientists incompetent or anything that is worse, I am simply stating my doubts as to how much mankind is affecting the system and causing the CO2 increases that are responsible for the rise in temperatures over the last 100 years.

Obviously mankind is affecting the global system and the extent of this effect can be seen in places like Greenland where there are black pools of soot miles in size, with soot dating back to the turn of the century. This is not a trivial effect, and there are other dramatic signs of human influence on the ecosystem that results in changes that are not positive in their implications.

Even with this sort of evidence of human influence on Global Ecosystems and the recorded increase in C02 levels either from natural causes and man made causes I still have to question how much influence this has on global warming, I have read estimates anywhere from .5% to 25%.

Some scientists can be alarmists and exaggerate claims as to how much influence these things have. Coupled with the fact that politicians will inevitably use the exaggerated numbers to justify drastic changes that could have a negative impact. Which is one of the biggest reasons I tend to question the estimated amount of influence humans have on the trend.

The science behind the warming trend is good, that I don't doubt, the amount of impact humans have is suspect, and I think it can be used for justification to fleece more money from the masses while no real effort is made toward correcting the big offenders such as businesses that reek havoc on the environment.

Here is one of my complaints - Few years back old Al Gore, in the US, they were proposing to put meters on all of our cars and charge a "global warming tax" to those that drive over a certain number of miles per month. They want to do this because they believe that all the cars in the US are contributing 25% of the CO2 that is causing global warming. Really 25%? Thankfully that was shot down some time ago. However, that's the kind of sudo science and subsequent laws that I have a real problem with!!!

At the time I did quite a bit of digging to try and find the names of the scientists that estimated that the cars and trucks in the US contributed 25% of the CO2 emissions found in the atmosphere. Never did find any references or names on that one. Just big Al making these claims to justify a "global warming tax".

As always thanks for your responses Bikerman!! You sure make me think before I respond!!!
Bikerman
Well, the question of how much we are contributing is still open, of course. The latest paper I know of indicates a much higher figure than previously thought - around 75%.
http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/v5/n1/abs/ngeo1327.html
tonberry
An old topic with even the last answer more than half year long, but since the topic is relevant, I guess it's ok to post.

Just wanted to mention that increasing amount of scientists believe that human contribution to global warming is at least significant. Throughout the years, the more research comes out, the bigger % of it points to our involvement and many scientists who have believed we have nothing to do with it now believe we do.

Whether it is true or not, mostly good things come out of it so even if it's a lie, it's a lie worth believing in.
alexms
Neutral
Bikerman
tonberry wrote:
Whether it is true or not, mostly good things come out of it so even if it's a lie, it's a lie worth believing in.
Not in a science forum it isn't. The case for anthropomorphic climate change is overwhelming so no belief is necessary...
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