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Do you enjoy cooking?





TurtleShell
For the last two and a half years, I've been a full-time cook for my family. Since I started baking my own bread, I've become VERY interested in making everything I can from scratch. Everything from sauces to broths, breads to cakes, soups to risottos. I don't harvest my own food, but I like to buy produce as fresh as possible, and I like to cut back as much as I can on buying boxed food products.

I love to talk about cooking, and I'd love to hear from some other people out there who share my enthusiasm. Do you have a specialty? What do you enjoy cooking the most?

I'm a vegetarian, which makes cooking a little more complicated in some ways, but it's just as rewarding as cooking meats, I think.
ocalhoun
I actually very much enjoy cooking, though I only cook for myself.

Rather than make everything from scratch, I'll usually start with some pre-made product (like store-bought pasta sauce), but I always add things to it and change it to make it extremely delicious.
(In the pasta sauce example, I might add roasted tomato and red pepper, some fresh spices, and use good Italian sausage rather than beef... and cook the meat separately along with the veggies first. Add that to tricks like boiling the noodles with spices and olive oil, and adding in delicate spices like garlic after cooking, and it gets very good.)

I also tend to go 'freestyle' I never measure anything, nor do I ever follow recipes except occasionally as rough guidelines. Usually turns out good enough to make the guys at work jealous of my packed lunch though. ^.^
Cheeldash
I like to cook too, but i'm not very expert. Everytime i use oil, i use too much,
My speciality is pasta and cheese, after the pasta is ready, the water is removed and the cheeses diced are added in the pot along with some oil and one egg. When the cheeses melt it ready.
I follow recipes only when making cakes.
menino
Cooking from scratch is rewarding in its own way, apart from the fresh taste.
Since you are cooking for yur family, I'm sure the main ingredient is love.

I cook sometimes, but don't like to spend too much time in the kitchen cooking.
My favourite are omelets.

I'm just wondering if you were vegetarian from the beginning, or did something make you a vegetarian?
mathiaus
I've only recently started to do any real cooking and I'm far from doing everything from scratch though it sounds rather idyllic! Most of the cooking is done for me so I don't cook that often but when I ave the chance, I again like to try to do so and actually learn new skills and either cook something different or something the same but with a new twist or just experiment and see what I end up with.

Maybe when some recipes or special techniques are posted here, I'll be encouraged to make more of an effort!

I'm trying to be healthier in the new year as well and intend to be more active so cooking with sport in mind would be great Very Happy
standready
I enjoy cooking as well especially when I can prepare a meal for friends. Cooking for one is not all that enjoyable. I will never be a chef but have not killed anyone yet with my cooking.
Bikerman
Yes, I very much enjoy cooking - which is just as well because my wife is such a terrible cook I banned her from my kitchen soon after we got married Smile
My favourite type of cooking is probably classical French, but I also enjoy cooking various Asian cuisines - Chinese, Thai, Indian & Vietnamese in particular.
spinout
haha, ban the wife - good for you. I hate when 2 people collide in the kitchen - 2 kitchens is the way to go!!
Bikerman
No point - Caz (my wife) is quite happy to let me cook and I'm quite happy to do it.
She can probably boil an egg and make toast, but even then......
deanhills
Great thread TurtleShell! I love food .... Very Happy Like Ocalhoun, I'm a freestyle cook, I rarely measure things. And like TurtleShell I prefer fresh from scratch, not only because it is healthy, but also because it tastes better as well. I always start with a base of onion, (lots of) garlic, (lots of) freshly grated ginger, and bell peppers (variety of colours) fried in coconut oil and then add fresh vegetables, always tomato, and I do like snow peas, but any other vegetables are great too, together with chickpeas or black beans or lentils or a combination of beans.

I also love juicing vegetables. It started off as a "sacrifice" for being healthy and hard work, but eventually it became really easy and I started to enjoy it. In the beginning I had to work with recipes as freestyle initially was responsible for flops. But once I had mastered the recipes, and adapted the basics to new ones for myself, I started to do the vegetable juicing freestyle as well. I never juice onion as I am not really partial to it raw, but bell pepper, garlic, ginger, cucumber, freshly squeezed lemon, tomato and celery always go great together. Garlic does not go well with sweet, such as beetroot and apple. One juice that is great is spinach, apple, cucumber, ginger, freshly squeezed lemon, and celery. Also beetroot, cucumber, ginger, freshly squeezed lemon, celery and carrot. Green apple, rind of a lemon and lemon juice make for a great lemonade!
Bikerman
Indian vegetarian is my favourite when we do without the meat.
A quick, easy and very tasty standby dish to have in your repertoire is Peppers stuffed with Dosa potatoes.
Parboil 3 or 4 medium sized spuds until they are about halfway cooked. Peel the skins off and rough-dice them (about 1cm cubes). While they cool heat some oil in a wok/pan, chuck in 3 or 4 curry leaves & a teaspoon or so of mustard seeds. Fry for a few seconds on high (the seeds should be popping if it is hot enough), then lower the heat and chuck in a large chopped onion, a teaspoon of turmeric, fresh chopped chillies to taste (a couple of green chillies with the seeds left in is my normal 'dose', but different people like different heat), and a good pinch of salt. Keep it moving around until the onions are well cooked and brown (they always say 'golden' in the recipe books, but that isn't dark enough - basically you want them rusty brown but obviously not burned). Chuck the diced spuds in and stir stir-in a mug of hot water - enough to just cover the spuds. Give it a good stir, bring back to simmer and leave it until the spuds are tender and the liquid has almost gone - you want a thick masala consistency, not at all runny.
Leave to cool whilst you:
Chop the top off 3 - 6 bell peppers (depending on size and amount of Dosa made), cut or pull the seeds out and slice the bottoms to give a flat surface. Fill with the dosa spud mix and pop the tops back on the peppers.
When ready to serve, stick them in a 180 C oven for about 20 mins or so (depends on the oven).

Done.

They make a great starter, or you can add some other veg (spiced cabbage goes well) and serve with chapatis. If you really want to push the boat out then a side of Dal (I prefer chana dal) and you have a feast fit for a Mogul prince.
deanhills
Wow ....never had this before in a bell pepper, sounds like a wonderful idea! I love Indian food. Those spuds could also be nice in a Dosa. I never have masala dosa (i.e. spuds with dosa) as it is a bit rich but the Indians here love to snack on Masala Dosa, which is your variety of spuds in a crispy super thin savoury pancake The pancake is always made fresh. I have never made it myself, as I would imagine it would take hours to perfect it, have you made it by any chance? What I do know is that the batter is quite a lengthy process and starts off with one cup of raw urad dahl to three cups of raw rice and a small teaspoon of fenugreek seeds. One first washes them, and then soaks them overnight for at least 12 hours outside of a fridge. Then one drains off the water and grinds the rice and urad dahl in a food processor only adding a little water if necessary. Then let it stand for a further 8 hours. Put in salt to taste and then make the pancake. The pancake part is real art as it has the consistence of flimsy paper It is usually prepared with canola oil. My Indian friends (from Kerala) usually make one batch to last the whole week, so once the batter is ready, it goes to the fridge. I've studied the recipes to death, but have not got to the stage of making them.

I'm much more partial to appam, which is a softer version of the above. It is also quite an art to cook, which I have not acquired yet, so I mostly have that when I am in one of the smaller cafeterias in Dubai. The best Indian food I've had, has been in those canteen type cafeterias rather than the big and fancy restaurants.
Bikerman
I tried that once but I wasn't very successful - the pancakes were too thick. They tasted OK but not nearly as good as the 'real' thing. It is, as you say, a skill that needs to be honed and I reckon you would need to make quite a lot of them to get the technique right. I switched to making pakoras and samosas instead - just as tasty but much easier to make Smile
adri
I do not always enjoy cooking. If I don't have a lot of time, than cooking isn't my favorite hobby. (I tend to solve that problem by just putting a pizza in the oven or calling the pizzeria or just going to the Frituur) But I do enjoy cooking when I have a lot of time. Smile Most of the time, I make typical Belgian food just like I learned from my mom, dad, grandparents. Seldomly, I prepare something that isn't typical for my region. Most of time that will be Wok (pieces of chicken with all the vegetables that I can find at home Smile -> good for getting rid of old vegetables in a delicious way Laughing ).


But to be honest, I don't cook that much... As a student, since october, I now often eat in the local restaurant (=time saving Smile ) of the college (also eating typical Belgian food), it doesn't cost that much (2.5 - 5) and it's not that bad. Smile


adri
Bikerman
Here's another quick tip - for the perfect chip.
Take some Maris Piper spuds. Parboil them (yes, really). Peel and cut into chips. Dry off and fry on low (about 150 if you have a deep-fat fryer with a thermometer/thermostat) until just colouring up slightly. Take out and let cool/drain. When needed (any time from 30 mins to several hours later), bang the fat on full heat and fry the chips for a few mins until they are golden brown.
Result - perfectly fluffy and soft in the middle with a nice crunchy outer coating =- perfect chips Smile
iyepes
I really enjoy cooking, as long as I live on my own I do it often, however is has more fun when you cook for someone else, soup for one is good, but is better to share the pot.

I like to test new recipes and flavours, sometimes the outcome doesn't taste good, but is a learning process, goods and bads Smile

I remember one time I bought shark. I remembered once I went to the coast and ate a good cooked piece of shark, so I tried to repeat it. That was a terrible mistake, I didn't know sharks have a natural anti-freeze liquid in their meat, so you have to leave it in water to drain that liquid. I didn't do it, so, the dish tasted like motor anti-freeze (but was no toxic).

I had a lovely boyfriend then who ate the fish, that was pure love, ha, ha, ha.
Bikerman
One of my worst blunders was an Okra dish many years ago. Okra was new to me (and to most people) then, but I'd had it at a restaurant and wanted to impress a bunch of visiting Malaysian lecturers and students coming over for Dinner - I had a rep as a good cook and had offered to cook a special meal for the party on their last night in England.
Having never cooked it before, I cooked it just like I would carrots or similar veggies - simmered in some stock until tender.
It was ghastly - slimy and downright nasty - in fact it made me nauseous. I've since discovered that some people actually like it that way, but not me - if I have to use it nowadays I stick to frying/sauteing in oil.
cadbrent
I enjoy cooking when I have free time. I love backing, preparing chainese,etc.
Nameless
I've been cooking evening meals for my family (4 large) for around a year. For a while I followed a bunch of recipes from old Weight Watchers cookbooks or the all-knowing internet; I or my mother would pick them out a week in advance so we had the ingredients, but I got sick of that after a while. I still make a few favourites now and then, but mostly it's just generic meat/veg/bread. Sometimes I throw together some arbitrary quiche or something, eh. Sometimes they're delicious, sometimes I still burn things. I've never really enjoyed it anyway. Confused
ProfessorY91
Another Indian cook here, this time from the North-Eastern region (Calcutta / Bangladesh). My family eats out once in a blue moon. As such, I've picked up enough dishes to cobble together a decent curry, paratha, dahl, biriyani, or whatever when I want to. Some of the (very few) specialty dishes that I can make include fried eggplant (its damn good, really), 'begun baji', raita (a yogurt dish), Korma (marinated chicken, Indian style), and a few desserts. I'm no great chef, but in my opinion going to college really hammers the need into you. Unless you're one of those people that enjoy paying the $2K meal plans and living off of cheap/shitty dorm food.

My compliments to the Kerala / South Indian dishes that I read about above. There are actually a lot of similarities, but the cooking styles are distinct.

Y.
ocalhoun
Bikerman wrote:

It was ghastly - slimy and downright nasty - in fact it made me nauseous. I've since discovered that some people actually like it that way, but not me

Only if it's in a good gumbo! ^.^
That's the one thing I miss about Mississippi... had some good food there.
My favorites are Mexican, Italian, and Cajun... but it's very hard to find good ingredients for the latter in South Dakota.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
Bikerman wrote:

It was ghastly - slimy and downright nasty - in fact it made me nauseous. I've since discovered that some people actually like it that way, but not me

Only if it's in a good gumbo! ^.^
That's the one thing I miss about Mississippi... had some good food there.
My favorites are Mexican, Italian, and Cajun... but it's very hard to find good ingredients for the latter in South Dakota.
I love Cajun cooking, but only the dishes I tried in New Orleans. I bought some Cajun spices in New Orleans that I took home with me, and the taste was not bad, however I just could not get it to taste as special as the dishes I had sampled in New Orleans.
Insanity
I really like cooking for friends when I have my own place. But I don't seem to do it a lot when I'm living with othe rpeople. It's kind of strange that way.
dapopeyoh
I enjoy cooking. I am not really a great cook, but I have my speciality. I mostly cook for myself bcos I live alone.
sudipbanerjee
I like cooking but I didn't know a lot of item to cook. I only manage Rice, Egg Curry, Chicken Curry and Chilly Chicken. I can cook these items for 4-5 persons.
airh3ad
I had enjoy cooking this xmas and new year at my home together with my family i cooked adobo - local food here.
deanhills
airh3ad wrote:
I had enjoy cooking this xmas and new year at my home together with my family i cooked adobo - local food here.
What is adobo? Smile
goutha
I enjoy cooking, but I love more eating.

I also like watching cooking shows.
TiffxMaggot
I always find that if you make it yourself at home it usually seems to taste much better than if you were to buy a ready to eat meal some where else.
deanhills
TiffxMaggot wrote:
I always find that if you make it yourself at home it usually seems to taste much better than if you were to buy a ready to eat meal some where else.
Me too. I used to eat out most of the time as well as heat up frozen meals at home, and there is simply no comparison. There also seems to be some special energy that goes into the food and preparation of the food can be a meditation of sorts. I do like to eat out though on the odd occasion. In fact, tonight went to a very special restaurant in our area called the "Curry House". The food was really amazing, and the company really great. Guess that makes for a good meal too, the company that one shares the meal with.
TiffxMaggot
deanhills wrote:
In fact, tonight went to a very special restaurant in our area called the "Curry House". The food was really amazing, and the company really great. Guess that makes for a good meal too, the company that one shares the meal with.


Yes some restaurants have amazing food, the only good eat in restaurant I have out my way is an Applebees unless I want to drive a half an hour.
kentchui
i like eating.
goutha
kentchui wrote:
i like eating.


Smile funny!

I think that we all like eating...
andysart380
ocalhoun wrote:
I actually very much enjoy cooking, though I only cook for myself.

Rather than make everything from scratch, I'll usually start with some pre-made product (like store-bought pasta sauce), but I always add things to it and change it to make it extremely delicious.
(In the pasta sauce example, I might add roasted tomato and red pepper, some fresh spices, and use good Italian sausage rather than beef... and cook the meat separately along with the veggies first. Add that to tricks like boiling the noodles with spices and olive oil, and adding in delicate spices like garlic after cooking, and it gets very good.)

I also tend to go 'freestyle' I never measure anything, nor do I ever follow recipes except occasionally as rough guidelines. Usually turns out good enough to make the guys at work jealous of my packed lunch though. ^.^


you should try prego meat sauce (no actual meat in it) and all you have to add is some minced garlic (spice world preferably) and some light brown sugar, it tastes amazing thats what i do, i also like to cook my meat first i dont trust cooking meat in the sauce.
andysart380
almost forgot i want to give away my meatball recipe..

this is a one pound beef batch..

all of this is eyeballed to what you think best

one egg, chopped onion about one half an onion, Italian breadcrumbs MIXED WITH CRUSHED RITZ CRACKERS--very important
about half and half bread crumbs & Ritz
and a good handful of mixed shredded cheese

for cooking them i bake at about 375 in small muffin tins you wanna make it so the meatball doesn't quite fit in the muffin tin so the oil goes to the bottom and it takes about 20 minutes and i rotate halfway through.. i usually just cut 1 open to check them towards the end

so there is my rough cut of my meatball recipe maybe later ill share swiss stake or breaded haddock but i need a review of this first
deanhills
Awesome recipe andysart380. Never heard it made with Ritz crackers before. I used to love meatballs as a kid, especially the way my mom made it:
Mince meat, grated onion, salt and pepper, lots of worcester sauce, ketchup, one raw egg, one slice of bread that has been soaked in milk/water. Quite messy as she would always get stuck in with her bare hands and mix it all together. Then make them in small sized balls, use a large pyrex dish, put some water in it, and bake the meat balls in the oven the way you do yours. We used to enjoy those for road trips.

She also packed some special egg sandwiches. Not sure whether I would want to eat them now, but she used to boil eggs, then shell then when they are still hot, and use a fork to mince them with some butter, salt and pepper. Then use this as a sandwich filling. Went down quite well at the time. Smile
rjraaz
Cooking! i like very much as from my student life always have to cook my food my own in hostel room.
Always like experiment with lots of dishes.

Sanjeev Kapoor is my cooking hero.

unfortunately there is no hotel management like courses while i was doing my college.
deanhills
rjraaz wrote:
Cooking! i like very much as from my student life always have to cook my food my own in hostel room.
Always like experiment with lots of dishes.
What is your favourite dish, and do you have a recipe for it? Smile
rjraaz
deanhills wrote:
What is your favourite dish, and do you have a recipe for it? Smile


My favourite dish is " Dal Bati Churma ". did you hear about it. Question

and about recipe i do not know is it comes again TOS of forum or not if moderators will allow or confirm that this not comes again TOS i will edit this post as soon as they respond.
iman
Yes! Because I love eating what I cook.
And especially the feeling you get when others enjoy your cooking
ocalhoun
andysart380 wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
I actually very much enjoy cooking, though I only cook for myself.

Rather than make everything from scratch, I'll usually start with some pre-made product (like store-bought pasta sauce), but I always add things to it and change it to make it extremely delicious.
(In the pasta sauce example, I might add roasted tomato and red pepper, some fresh spices, and use good Italian sausage rather than beef... and cook the meat separately along with the veggies first. Add that to tricks like boiling the noodles with spices and olive oil, and adding in delicate spices like garlic after cooking, and it gets very good.)

I also tend to go 'freestyle' I never measure anything, nor do I ever follow recipes except occasionally as rough guidelines. Usually turns out good enough to make the guys at work jealous of my packed lunch though. ^.^


you should try prego meat sauce (no actual meat in it) and all you have to add is some minced garlic (spice world preferably) and some light brown sugar, it tastes amazing thats what i do, i also like to cook my meat first i dont trust cooking meat in the sauce.

Well, that's pretty much what I do now, only I usually don't get the low-quality ones like prego.
There are other brands that are more expensive, but give better variety and much better quality.
ankitdatashn
Had not cook much in my life except maggi and just warming milk for drinking... Smile
Helios
I love cooking. My parents were often at work most of the time, so when I was a kid I started to learn how to prepare meals from stuff I had the fridge without using a lot of recipes.
Today I make really good meals (at least other people say so!).
I have no real names for the meals I make, since I'm just taking ingredients and turning them into meals. I do use stuff like wine and alcohol, exotic spices (abundant here in Israel!) and ingredients. I like italian and asian cooking a lot.
I also know how to chop really fast, even got one of those large nakiri bocho knives. Razz
mukesh
i like to eat different types of food but i don't know make food Very Happy
ocalhoun
mukesh wrote:
i like to eat different types of food but i don't know make food Very Happy

You should learn.

Not knowing how to make food is just sad.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
mukesh wrote:
i like to eat different types of food but i don't know make food Very Happy

You should learn.

Not knowing how to make food is just sad.
Nice that you put it this way as preparing food does relax me and is usually an enjoyable experience. However, I sometimes admire those who can feel completely dispassionate about food to the extent that they have zero interest in preparing their own. I do go through phases like that periodically, but I usually like a good meal that is prepared from scratch, particularly where different spices and foods have been combined for a really great taste. Where I am there are also great restaurants for food that is prepared with a blend of spices, except they do seem to go nuts with salt at times. What I like about eating at restaurants is that they also provide me with some great ideas, i.e. expand my taste buds if one could call that. It is almost like a hobby of mine to check out recipes on the Internet, and then to follow those to a fashion, not to the letter but with improvisation and my own version of it. Sometimes the end product is a real disaster, but I do have some hits occasionally. Smile
TurtleShell
I became a vegetarian because my partner is a vegetarian, and I lost an argument with her one night. Also, it's better for the environment. I like being a vegetarian, and don't really miss meat much. I do miss having a greater variety of food choices on menus when I go out to eat, though. Most of the world still eats meat and there's not a lot I can do about that.

However, this is part of why I love mexican food so much--meat-based dishes in mexican restaurants are so easily turned into veggie dishes. Just substitute meat for beans and there you go. It's wonderfully flexible that way.
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
mukesh wrote:
i like to eat different types of food but i don't know make food Very Happy

You should learn.

Not knowing how to make food is just sad.
Nice that you put it this way as preparing food does relax me and is usually an enjoyable experience. However, I sometimes admire those who can feel completely dispassionate about food to the extent that they have zero interest in preparing their own.

Well, I meant more from a survival/self-sufficient standpoint...
It just seems sad to be so helpless.

I feel completely dispassionate about hunting/farming... but I could do either, and would be able to produce (and then cook) my own food if I needed to.
(Hunting/farming not being my passion, I have no problem paying others to do it for me... but not even knowing how seems derelict.)

Perhaps it's just a quirk of my world-view though that causes me to associate self-sufficiency with self-worth? Confused
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
Well, I meant more from a survival/self-sufficient standpoint...
It just seems sad to be so helpless.
OK. Got it. However I don't think that I would be as self-sufficient as you are out in the wild. I'd probably be more inclined to take emergency rations with me. If I'm to rough it, I'd probably be in a semi-fasting mode. I would want to travel as light as I can. Not really my style however as I like my creature comforts. My idea of partaking of the wild is to have a nice chalet ready for me at the end of the day with hot shower laid on, and enjoy cooking by a happy chef and drinks that are indigenous to the area I'm visiting. Very Happy
TurtleShell
ocalhoun wrote:
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
mukesh wrote:
i like to eat different types of food but i don't know make food Very Happy

You should learn.

Not knowing how to make food is just sad.
Nice that you put it this way as preparing food does relax me and is usually an enjoyable experience. However, I sometimes admire those who can feel completely dispassionate about food to the extent that they have zero interest in preparing their own.

Well, I meant more from a survival/self-sufficient standpoint...
It just seems sad to be so helpless.

I feel completely dispassionate about hunting/farming... but I could do either, and would be able to produce (and then cook) my own food if I needed to.
(Hunting/farming not being my passion, I have no problem paying others to do it for me... but not even knowing how seems derelict.)

Perhaps it's just a quirk of my world-view though that causes me to associate self-sufficiency with self-worth? Confused


I can cook now, but I can't hunt and I'm bad at growing things, and if the end of the world ever comes and modern civilization falls and I'm left to my own, I will probably die. I can make my own breads and sauces and crusts and various things that most people only buy in grocery stores, but I can't grow the wheat or milk the cow or any of that. I accept that and I'm happy enough knowing that I can make the crusts and the breads and the sauces, if given the proper materials. It's not really about survival, it's about going beyond factory-made foods and doing things that most people assume that they can't, or just won't.
deanhills
TurtleShell wrote:
I can cook now, but I can't hunt and I'm bad at growing things, and if the end of the world ever comes and modern civilization falls and I'm left to my own, I will probably die. I can make my own breads and sauces and crusts and various things that most people only buy in grocery stores, but I can't grow the wheat or milk the cow or any of that. I accept that and I'm happy enough knowing that I can make the crusts and the breads and the sauces, if given the proper materials. It's not really about survival, it's about going beyond factory-made foods and doing things that most people assume that they can't, or just won't.
I'm almost certain if you're in a situation where your life depended on finding food, you will find a way, and probably surprise yourself. I guess all of us should have a disaster kit or something, and if that runs out, equipment to make things grow, as well as seed to plant. It can be as simple as wheat grass, beans, tomatoes, potatoes, etc. I've stopped dairy, so won't miss the milk. Probably be much more healthy to live on greens. Just not so sure what to do if there is no water around. I'm sure Ocalhoun may have a plan for that. I know one can buy chemical purifiers for water, and one can dig for it as well. Or have a rain tank of sorts.
TurtleShell
Doesnt' boiling water kill a lot of the bacteria, assuming you're at a reasonable elevation? otherwise, I suppose you need a pressure cooker, which I dont' have, but I live at around sea level. I also have some tablets that I bought to put in water when I went to Peru, but they're nasty things. You can drink the water, but don't want to.

I should have a disaster kit in my home. You know, I should do that this weekend. We live in Los Angeles. It's practically the US's disaster grand central. I think we have some extra gallons of water around, but not enough. And then we have cans of beans and things, but...what else should we have?

Do you miss dairy? Are you vegan, or just dairy-free? Did you do it because you were lactose intolerant, or for ethical reasons, or health reasons?
ocalhoun
1: There are lots of ways to purify water; some of the better ones:
-Sub-micron filtration
-Boiling
-Chemicals
-Distilling (pretty easy actually; just boil it and condense the steam)
-UV (no fancy set-up required; put (clear) water out in clear bottles on a sunny day. after 24 hours of exposure, all bacteria/viruses will have been killed by exposure to the sun's UV light -- Be sure to allow lots of extra time for cloudy days or cloudy water -- this has been used successfully in Africa.)

2: I didn't mean you have to be apocalypse-ready or anything... just that it's sad to not be able to do even simple things for yourself... As if you missed some part of growing up into an independent adult.
(I'd feel the same way about a fattie not being able to walk up the stairs, or someone stuck on the side of the road because they don't know how to change a tire...)
TurtleShell
I don't know how to change a tire. I may get caught on the side of the road someday. I think about this sometimes, and it bothers me. But the men in my life, my father, step father, brother--people I would have asked to show me how to do this--live far away. But, I can make tomato sauce from scratch no problem, and I'm working on making sourdough. It's not as easy as it sounds. is it sexist that I would ask the men i know to show me how to change a tire? that I wouldn't even consider asking the women? yes, I guess so.
lovescience
I like to prepare food without salt, with fresh vegetable and fruit.

I like to put tomato in hot water for just a bit of time. When its skin starts to peel off, I will take it out of the hot water and just put it in noodles.

A little bit of cheese does magic on food and also oil with omega-3.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
-UV (no fancy set-up required; put (clear) water out in clear bottles on a sunny day. after 24 hours of exposure, all bacteria/viruses will have been killed by exposure to the sun's UV light -- Be sure to allow lots of extra time for cloudy days or cloudy water -- this has been used successfully in Africa.)
Darn! I have not heard of this one before. And it is the simplest one of them all Very Happy I gather the clear bottles are glass bottles and not plastic bottles? I'm definitely going to try this as although we are now in our 10th day of continuous dust storms, we do get plenty of sunshine here.

ocalhoun wrote:
-2: I didn't mean you have to be apocalypse-ready or anything... just that it's sad to not be able to do even simple things for yourself... As if you missed some part of growing up into an independent adult.
(I'd feel the same way about a fattie not being able to walk up the stairs, or someone stuck on the side of the road because they don't know how to change a tire...)
OK, then I'm super independent. I think I was born independent. My parents had to keep tabs on me from an infant, as the moment I got a chance I was always out the gate, or if anything needed to be done, like fixing heater or toaster cords, etc. etc. and someone did not do it immediately, it must have been my impatience at the time, but I then just did it myself if I could. When I started out as a kid I would open up a plug that was in good shape and check how it was put together, and then compare it with the faulty one. A lot of those things are probably easier than we think they are. But I think this drive to be independent must be something one is born with? And perhaps has to do with impatience, curiosity to do things oneself, a sense of wanting to learn new things all the time and the nice feeling of accomplishment when one has mastered something etc?

I must say in this disposable type environment we are living these days however, I have become lazy, as appliances are dirt cheap these days, and it is always nice to have an excuse for buying a new one. And one pretty much can get new cords with plugs anywhere. Electrics and electronics have pretty much become disposable items.
Ghost900
I enjoy baking more than cooking but I can do both pretty well. I don't enjoy store-made deserts so I have to bake most of them. I enjoy cooking when I have time as well to try ethnic foods though with college I don't have all that much time right now.
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
-UV (no fancy set-up required; put (clear) water out in clear bottles on a sunny day. after 24 hours of exposure, all bacteria/viruses will have been killed by exposure to the sun's UV light -- Be sure to allow lots of extra time for cloudy days or cloudy water -- this has been used successfully in Africa.)
Darn! I have not heard of this one before. And it is the simplest one of them all Very Happy I gather the clear bottles are glass bottles and not plastic bottles? I'm definitely going to try this as although we are now in our 10th day of continuous dust storms, we do get plenty of sunshine here.

(most) Plastic bottles will add toxic chemicals to the water, but they will still work. - The chemicals are less harmful than the bacteria that might be in the water.
(And put the bottles on a non-flammable surface! If the sun hits them just right, they can focus the light and start a fire like a magnifying glass.)
(And if you make cloudy water clear by letting it settle, pour it into a new bottle without sediment for purifying; otherwise the sediment at the bottom will still contain live bacteria and contaminate the purified water.)
nigam
lovescience wrote:
I like to prepare food without salt, with fresh vegetable and fruit.

I like to put tomato in hot water for just a bit of time. When its skin starts to peel off, I will take it out of the hot water and just put it in noodles.

A little bit of cheese does magic on food and also oil with omega-3.



that sounds yummy.....i used to eat fresh green tomatoes but i put some small salt for a taste Smile however, i stop eating tomatoes because some of my friends told me that those seeds can block your internal parts in which can cause or the reason to have appendicitis....
deanhills
nigam wrote:
lovescience wrote:
I like to prepare food without salt, with fresh vegetable and fruit.

I like to put tomato in hot water for just a bit of time. When its skin starts to peel off, I will take it out of the hot water and just put it in noodles.

A little bit of cheese does magic on food and also oil with omega-3.



that sounds yummy.....i used to eat fresh green tomatoes but i put some small salt for a taste Smile however, i stop eating tomatoes because some of my friends told me that those seeds can block your internal parts in which can cause or the reason to have appendicitis....
Wow! That does sound quite scary. I've been eating quite a number of tomatoes lately. Probably need to lighten up on it anyway. I like the way that lovescience prepares his tomatoes. I have not tried that but would be great to get rid of the skin. I particularly like it with avocado, but think I may give it a rest, as perhaps time for different veggies. Smile
day_and_night
i love to cook. i don't do it often enough however i guess to make up for the lack of cooking, i watch cooking shows Smile
deanhills
day_and_night wrote:
i love to cook. i don't do it often enough however i guess to make up for the lack of cooking, i watch cooking shows Smile
Me too. I love those. Plenty of those shows on YouTube. I also liked the BBC "Chef" comedy series with Gareth Blackstock (Lenny Henry). I like watching people cook Very Happy
ocalhoun
I've sometimes wondered... Do people who watch cooking shows ever imitate the dishes shown, or do they watch for entertainment only?
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
I've sometimes wondered... Do people who watch cooking shows ever imitate the dishes shown, or do they watch for entertainment only?
I watch it for entertainment. I think about doing some of it, but by the time the show has finished, I usually have forgotten the ingredients. What I do pick up on are the techniques for preparing the ingredients, and putting it all together. The shows are of course always well organized because they have to to move speedily with focus on entertainment. It can also be social entertainment in live environments, with watching friends cooking and have a whiskey or wine while the cooking is in progress.
ankitdatashn
Not much cooking these days for me only warming up milk and making soup, that's all Smile
Insanity
I used to do so much cooking when I was living on my own, but after I moved out and started living with roommates who know how to cook a lot more and a lot better, I stopped cooking so much. It's a shame because I used to do it so often, but now laziness has now taken over. I used to watch cooking shows all the time.
CheDragon
I do but I suck
ratanegra
I'd like to cook but I don't know how. I always burn things and then I have to eat them!

That's why I don't cook: I don't like either to eat burnt food or to drop it.
ProwerBot
I like cooking some stuff. Especially sweets like cookies and stuff. Soo bad for you but how can you resist the temptation? Also whenever I make frozen pizza I have to put more sauce and more cheese on it otherwise I feel like I cheated Very Happy
nepalstar
I'm 30 years old guy till now I never cook. I'm from Nepal I live with my parents, actually in my country the guy don't have to cook, cooking responsibility is totally for women/girls. Sometime I also wish to cook but my Mom don't allow me to cook saying that "That's not your job..." so nowadays I don't have interest to cook. but time is changing there so many friends of mine who cook in there home but there is only some few men who says that in publicly about cooking @ home.. Whenever I got time I try to learn cook... !
spring567
I enjoy cooking very much.
spinout
my favorite dish of my own cooking is porkchops in soya-sauce with mushrooms...

I also add some honey and "buljong" (hm, I wonder what that is in english?)
ankur209
Yeah !! sometimes when there is no other way left to please my stomach Smile

I love to cook only noodles,chowmein n chinese mostly Wink
ratanegra
spinout wrote:
my favorite dish of my own cooking is porkchops in soya-sauce with mushrooms...

I also add some honey and "buljong" (hm, I wonder what that is in english?)


Well, if what you mean is this buljong in sweedish and it's this: http://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buljong

Then buljong in English is 'broth'.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broth
But I understand that is like a basis liquid for soup, sauces, etc.
Do you prepare any sauce or something like that with it when you are going to add it to your pork chops?
mengshi200
I should enjoy cooking,but i have not enough time to do it .but i find a balance:use simple way to get taste food.for example, a litte sheep meet+water+wild cabbage,after boiling ,flavour is good.
deanhills
Today I came across a very interesting chain of Restaurants here in Bangkok, called the MK Restaurants. This has to be a great idea for those who are interested in cooking, but not the cleaning up afterwards. Basically one gets a soup base in a boiling pot on the middle of your table, and then you get to choose what you want to put in it for chicken, shrimps, veggies, etc. So one is cooking one's own meal in a way. The Restaurant was absolutely packed by locals. It has a great reputation here in Thailand, for really a great standard of food with no MSG. So if anyone wants to be treated to really good quality fresh food, this may be a great idea. It is also very economical and of course fun for a group of people together.
gs-resume
Just to follow up on meat substitutes like black beans. If you get the beans dry and in bulk it's way cheaper, stores much easier and you don't get nearly the amount of sodium. The cook pretty quickly in a pressure cooker too ~25 minutes. So there's as much prep work as you may think.

Dry beans will keep indefinitely if stored in a cool, dry place, but as time passes, their nutritive value and flavor degrade and cooking times lengthen. Dried beans are almost always cooked by boiling, often after having been soaked for several hours. While the soaking is not strictly necessary, it shortens cooking time and results in more evenly textured beans. In addition, discarding one or more batches of soaking water leaches out hard-to-digest complex sugars that can cause flatulence, though those who eat beans regularly rarely have difficulties with flatulence as intestinal microbes adjust. There are several methods including overnight soaking, and the power soak method, which is to boil beans for three minutes, then set them aside for 24 hours, then drain and discard the water and proceed with cooking.
vidafenomenal
enjoy cooking. it'a pleasure.
gs-resume
Indeed it is. proven to lower blood pressure as well. Cooking techniques and ingredients vary widely across the world, reflecting unique environmental, economic, and cultural traditions. Cooks themselves also vary widely in skill and training.
Chicken, pork and bacon-wrapped corn cooked in a barbecue smoker

Preparing food with heat or fire is an activity unique to humans, and some scientists believe the advent of cooking played an important role in human evolution. Most anthropologists believe that cooking fires first developed around 250,000 years ago. The development of agriculture, commerce and transportation between civilizations in different regions offered cooks many new ingredients. New inventions and technologies, such as pottery for holding and boiling water, expanded cooking techniques. Some modern cooks apply advanced scientific techniques to food preparation.
deanhills
I find it much more relaxing to watch cooking shows, than to do the cooking myself.
Very Happy
deanhills
samuelarnold wrote:
When my dad cooks, he takes his time overdoing everything but then when he's done, it tastes MAGNIFICENT so yeah
My brother and law is like that. By the time the food is ready we are completely starving, so anything would taste like heaven. He is an excellent cook however.
congra
actually i didn't like to cooking. i hate the lampblack but sometime have to cook too. i like the tastes ,which my mother cook. it smells so nice.
shivaghimire
Yes, I love cooking but I don't have ideas for many items but I know I like food prepared by me and I need not need to stay hungry if I am alone.
ratanegra
No, I don't. However, I enjoy eating. My cooking skills are not very good; I burn pretty much everything that I try to cook.
Ryox
I only enjoy cooking when I am cooking with my mom because she shows me what to do and how to do it, If she doesn't cook or help me cook than No I don't enjoy it <<
chic4u03
not enjoy to cook coz i dont know how to cook...^-^ but i love to eat..lol
shivaghimire
I enjoy cooking... also eating is enjoyful.
u16888
My answer is yes. actually I enjoy cooking very much, cooking for my wife my sons and myself. I cook dinner for my family everyday only. I search cookery book in my office everyday morning, then call back home and tell my maids to prepare the cooking martial before I am home. I cook dinner on everyday 5:30 pm as soon as I arrive home.

I love to cook vegetable, mushroom is my favorite dish,.
spinout
I got a reciepe that I have made myself:

1. Finecut pork meat.
2. fry in soy!
3. add lots of sirup!
4. insert a sour cream.
5. serve with potato mash!

yum yum
deanhills
spinout wrote:
I got a reciepe that I have made myself:

1. Finecut pork meat.
2. fry in soy!
3. add lots of sirup!
4. insert a sour cream.
5. serve with potato mash!

yum yum
Sounds to die for! Wow, now I am REALLY hungry!
Very Happy
srjrol
I really enjoy cooking for my wife. I like to slow cook anything that I can it makes it so much more enjoyable.
Insanity
I like cooking as it saves me a lot of money when I'm by myself. It's sometimes too time-consuming to cook, though, so sometimes I just throw something in the oven or microwave something easy. Otherwise, I'd spend too much time cooking.
deanhills
I've just become addicted to the sauce below - Tangy Rogan Josh - then checked up a recipe for it. I'm wondering whether this is a case of needing some of the ingredients in it. A few months ago I attended a Seminar where it was said that spices are very good for cardiovascular health. Not sure whether I believe that, but a good excuse for me anyway as I love spices - almost like a work of art for chefs to put it together just the right way. The Sri Lankans I think are excellent at this. The best curry I've ever tasted was a Fish Curry in Colombo. It is neither hot, nor mild. Just a very subtle combination of all of the spices, just in the right proportion to one another.

http://www.meenas.co.uk/products/8

This is a recipe for the sauce:
http://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/asia/indian/03/rec0324.html
ankitdatashn
I often feel afraid when I light up the gas as I have this phobia that the gas cylinder will blow away Very Happy
deanhills
ankitdatashn wrote:
I often feel afraid when I light up the gas as I have this phobia that the gas cylinder will blow away Very Happy
I go through periods like that too as one does hear about horror stories.

I love gas cooking however, for me that is the best cooking there is. I try and remember always to turn the main valve off at the end of the cooking, but don't seem to be able to remember all of the time.
davidv
I use to work as a chef in a variety restaurants and I have to say, it can get quite mundane sometimes. Especially when you're cooking incredibly large quantities of food. The last place I worked at was a catering company and on a daily basis we'd prepare and cook hundreds of kilos of whatever was listed on a piece of paper. It's stuff like that can really drain your passion for cooking.

Although, when cooking at home, when I genuinely want to cook and make something nice for dinner, I very much so enjoy it. Although, cleaning up... peeww what a mess.

Kilogram: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilogram

^ To all ya'll Americans Laughing
Rcocowild
Well since I dont eat meat cooking has become easier for me, therefore I enjoy it more. Smile
Syryus
I used to cook for my ex, but ever since we broke up i didn't want to do it anymore until a couple of days ago,when i was really hungry and had nothing already made so i did some japanese dish i used to love.
I think i'm gonna be cooking again today, it relaxes me sometimes and i can also enjoy japanese food.
SinoVax
I don't like to cook Smile
Cosmoslayer
No, but I enjoy eating. Very Happy
deanhills
Cosmoslayer wrote:
No, but I enjoy eating. Very Happy
I go through phases. Right now I'm just going through the motions of eating. Sometimes I like to cook. Sometimes not. It's getting very hot in the UAE right now. Cooking doesn't seem to fit right now.
lightningleo
well.. cooking have been always one of my habits..
i like to cook contemporary dishes and local dishes..
its kinda give relief from study hours..
chatrack
I used to help cooking.
sanjaya200
well I also love cooking,

I like to cook after going on a trip with friends, I love to cook and make food that get from the area were we go to. place specific dishes. I have loved cooking since my small days. I do not know how I learned to cook but I jest cook.
jimmi
I enjoy cooking when I have free time. I love preparing chainese, tradition etc.
abhizz
I love cooking Indian foods. My mother always helps me
Cosmoslayer
No, but I really enjoy eating! Very Happy
andro_king
i enjoy cooking..!!
samanyolu077
I don't like enjoy cooking.Because the dinner is my darling Very Happy
deanhills
I go through periods. Right now I cook regularly as I'm going through a health phase. But I also go through phases where I eat out a lot. Depends where I am.
alongkichu
Yea, once in a while.
Radar
I wish I did. It's a good life skill that I need to learn, but as someone who doesn't even have a developed appreciation for a well-cooked meal, it's hard to see the returns for your work.
deanhills
I cooked tonight for the first time after returning from my holidays. Sort of very simple fare. Organic hamburger that turned out to be quite delicious with tomato, onion, ginger and garlic .... generous portion of the tomato mix. Who knows, maybe I was just hungry enough to really enjoy it!
darthrevan
I do not like cooking. I am not a good cook either. I can only cook simple things, like hamburger, streaks, pork chops. I am not good at cooking complete meals.
deanhills
darthrevan wrote:
I do not like cooking. I am not a good cook either. I can only cook simple things, like hamburger, streaks, pork chops. I am not good at cooking complete meals.
I'm not a good cook either. If I do get to the point of cooking I know how to cook basics, but for the big stuff like roasts and things like that I'm not that good at all.
brucelewis
Hey ... i don't like cooking..... its not easy...
GuidanceReader
I love cooking, and have created many new recipes because of my diet.
BigGeek
I love cooking, and using fresh ingredients to prepare meals. Thing is that preparing meals with fresh veggies is usually a quick process because even cooking most vegetables is fast, less than 20 minutes.

One of my favorite and easy meals to prepare when your in a hurry is a fritata (I think that is how it is spelled) which is an egg dish.

Last night we got home late and needed a quick meal. Pulled veggies from the frig and chopped them up and browned them in a skillet. While they were cooking I whipped up 6 eggs, poured them over the cooked veggies and let them cook for about 8 minutes on the stove.

You have to use a skillet with a metal handle so you can put it in the broiler.

Set it in the broiler until the eggs were cooked in the top.

Pulled it out covered it with Salsa and cheese, and put it back in the broiler to melt the cheese.

Slice and server out of the skillet, takes about 30 minutes or less to prepare.

Served with Apple Slices!!

Easy, fresh and fast!!

Yeah I cook, and like to!
deanhills
I haven't had eggs in a while BigGeek, even when I purchased organic eggs two weeks ago. But now I'm motivated. I've always been curious how to cook Fritata, so now I've got a step by step how to do it.

What veggies do you usually cook with the Fritata?
rebbicajackson
I too love to cook but i always prefer Non-Veg as it is very easy to cook as well as we can serve it for all kind of dishes ( if you know what i mean Laughing )
deanhills
rebbicajackson wrote:
I too love to cook but i always prefer Non-Veg as it is very easy to cook as well as we can serve it for all kind of dishes ( if you know what i mean Laughing )
True. I find I get satiated much quicker too.
deanhills
jericho2997 wrote:
i built a cutom mini stove and use it to cook at my room!,Lol.
I'd be curious to know how you did this. Sort of something that could be posted in our Amazing Projects Sub-Forum.
lovescience
I enjoy cooking for more people.

I am more lazy sometimes when cooking for myself.

For myself, I would cook more than I could eat and store the rest of food, so I do not cook for next meal.

Or I would make something very quick and simple for one meal.
deanhills
My brother in law loves cooking for a large audience. Cooking is like a session that lasts for a number of hours, starting perhaps at 6:00 p.m. and us dying of hunger until we finally get to eat around 10:00 p.m. Having fun all of the way going through numerous aperitifs. He does roasted chicken perfectly.
grofet
im so lazy for preparing food so i only cook simple foods.
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