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SCAM E-MAILS





Chukastle
I get a lot of scam emails these days and this is one of them. Consider this email and tell me what you think. I don't know how they intend do play their game with me.


From : Miss stella Moroba
Abidjan, Ivory Coast
West Africa.


APPEAL FOR URGENT BUSINESS ASSISTANCE.

Permit me to inform you of my desire of going into business relationship with you.I prayed befor i contacted due to recommendations given to me from GOD that you are a reputable and trust worthy person that I can do business with and by the recommendation , I must not hesitate to confide inyou for this simple and sincere business.I am Miss Stella moroba the only doughter of late Mr.and Mrs.Joseph moroba .My father was a very wealthy cocoa merchant in Abidjan ,the economic capital of Ivory coast, my father was poisoned to dearth by his business associates on one of their outings on a business trip .My mother died when I was a baby and since then my father took me so special. Before the death of my father on oct 2009 in a private hos pital here in Abidjan he secretly called me on his bed side and told me that he has the sum of nine million,five hundred thousand United State Dollars. USD($9.500,000) left in fixed / suspense account in one of the prime bank here in Abidjan ,that he used my name as his only doughter for the next of Kin in depositing of the fund. He also explained to me that it was because of this wealth that he was poisoned by his business associates. That I should seek for a foreign partner in a country of my choice where i will transfer this money and use it for investment purpose such as realn estate management or hotel management .Dear,I am honourably seeking your assistance in the following ways:

(1) To provide a bank account into which this money would be transferred to .
(2) To serve as a guardian of this fund since I am only 19 years..
(3) To make arrangement for me to come over to your country to further my

education and to secure a resident permit in your country. Moreover, dear i am willing to offer you 15% of the total sum as compensation for your effort/ input after the successful transfer of this fund into your nominated account overseas. Furthermore, you indicate your options towards assisting me as I believe that this transaction would be concluded within fourteen (14) days you signify interest to assist me. Anticipating to hear from you soon.
Thanks and God bless.
Best regards,
From : Miss stella Moroba
standready
That is one great big scam. The second they get your bank account, all the money you have in the account would be gone plus they would use the information to open other accounts and credit cards. BEWARE! Do NOT respond!!!
SonLight
This is a common pattern for scam emails. They are frequently referred to as "419" scams because many of them come from Nigeria, where criminal code # 419 declares them to be illegal. As standready suggests, it is usually not wise to respond to such emails in any way. The sender is probably part of an organized criminal gang, and they will be only too happy to steal anything they can from you.

The usual pattern is apparently to engage their victims in continuing conversation, then promise to send a substantial sum of money. They are counting on greed to overcome good judgment, to get as much personal information from you as possible. Usually there is "one small problem" in getting the money to you, which can be overcome by you sending them a small amount up front.

In many cases they actually deposit money into your account, asking for a percentage of it to be paid to someone else. Generally the money you pay disappears, and so does the money they deposited, leaving you holding the bag.

If you string them along, giving out some personal information but not biting when they ask for money, they may retalliateby doing as much damage as they can to your finances and reputation, regardless of whether they get money by doing so.
airh3ad
email scams is very popular today, As more people use computers for handling financial transactions, from online banking to purchasing or selling goods at eBay, fraudsters have started use cleverly disguised spam to harvest information that allows them to break into online accounts and steal money. If you receive such emails, either disregard them or forward them to the security departments of the institutions they claim to originate from. You can also forward the messages.
Vrythramax
The scam outlined here has been around in one form or another for quite some time. Everyone should be wary of anything that asks for your account number, pin number(s), passwords, SS number, or any other personal piece of information.

In some cases it is not even safe to store such information on your computer. With Identity Theft on the rise the world over you should take whatever steps required to safe-guard your personal information.

A simple rule to *always* observe is: "If it appears too good to be true, it probably IS too good to be true!!"
deanhills
Vrythramax wrote:
The scam outlined here has been around in one form or another for quite some time. Everyone should be wary of anything that asks for your account number, pin number(s), passwords, SS number, or any other personal piece of information.

In some cases it is not even safe to store such information on your computer. With Identity Theft on the rise the world over you should take whatever steps required to safe-guard your personal information.

A simple rule to *always* observe is: "If it appears too good to be true, it probably IS too good to be true!!"
Right, and if it is Ivory Coast, or any of the African countries in that area, I would also be suspicious. (By the way, shouldn't the OP content have been in quotes? Wink)

Back to the posting, I did a Yahoo Search on Miss Stella Moroba and came up with 49 results.

Next step I took a portion of the message in the OP:
Quote:
My father was a very wealthy cocoa merchant in Abidjan ,the economic capital of Ivory coast, my father was poisoned to dearth by his business associates on one of their outings on a business trip .My mother died when I was a baby and since then my father took me so special. Before the death of my father on oct 2009 in a private hos pital here in Abidjan he secretly called me on his bed side and told me that he has the sum of nine million,five hundred thousand United State Dollars. USD($9.500,000) left in fixed / suspense account in one of the prime bank here in Abidjan ,that he used my name as his only doughter for the next of Kin in depositing of the fund.
Copied and pasted it into Yahoo Search, and then got 161 results.

Looks as though spamemailgraveyard.com is a good Website to check up on spam e-mails such as the above one. So it is probably quite easy to check on spam by doing the above searches.
SonLight
deanhills,

That site was a great find ( http://spamemailgraveyard.com/ ). Not only is the webmaster providing a good sample of scam emails, but his site is a fine example of creative use of the Internet to earn some extra money in a way that is beneficial to all (except the scammers, of course).

I do think the graveyard site should have scanned the emails to insure the links wouldn't be live. Remember also that they simply captured whatever emails came to a particular address, so the emails aren't necessarily representative of what is out there.

To check for copies of your own spam emails, either try a search like deanhills did, or get acquainted with a spam-reporting service like spamcop.net . The services hide the email content from the public,
which is necessary to avoid the possibility of revealing personal information of the spam recipients, but they will often tell you if a sample appears to be the same as one they have on file, and give you a lot of information about your samples and about spam in general.
deanhills
Thanks SonLight. I'm pretty neurotic about spam and try and minimize my exposure as much as I can. With e-mails I am always very suspicious and almost never open e-mails that I can't recognize are intended for me personally. I usually delete all of those before I open the e-mails that I can identify as legitimately mine. I have friends who have a lot of curiosity to explore these "strange" e-mails, especially the ones that promise lots of money. But Max is so right. When it looks too good to be true, it usually is too good to be true.
fr3ak
Use GMail, and get rid of scam Razz
Funniest scam I got is that some girl was writing me and saying that I got lot of millions from some guy in Africa, and all I need I do is to send some important credentials and numbers, credit card, my ID and so on. Laughing
sudipbanerjee
I also got a lot of scam e-mails this day. most of them informing me that I got a huge amount of money either through lottery or through rewards. they also ask me to give my bank details. Not a single time I respond in their mail. I think maximum people didn't respond in their mail. Then what is their profit by sending those mails?
spring567
me,too,I receive scam email every day.
meep
sudipbanerjee wrote:
Then what is their profit by sending those mails?

As long as there are people that are stupid enough to believe it (really, there are people like that Rolling Eyes), the scam emails will be around.
Personally I have never ever received a scam email, I've got a few with infected attachments though, but I never open emails if they contain attachments and I don't know the sender, and if I do know the sender I can check their writing style to see if it's really them, since everybody has at least a few writing habits which makes their mails unique from other's.
deanhills
meep wrote:
As long as there are people that are stupid enough to believe it (really, there are people like that Rolling Eyes), the scam emails will be around.
I wonder whether they are only stupid people, as I have above average intelligent friends who actually go for those kinds of e-mails. It completely boggles the mind! This one friend of mine actually reads his spam mails if they grab his imagination and then of course has to share those with me, particularly as it gets me exasperated every time ...... Once when he came up with standing a chance of coming into money - I can't remember the details of the scam, but it was a good one this time round - I did what I suggested in this thread. I copied and pasted part of the message, and then it came up with a few links explaining that it was a hoax. Guess it has to have a certain appeal for the dreamers of the world and those with a rich fantasy life? It does not necessarily mean they are dumb, just that they have certain character traits that make them ideal targets. Smile
SonLight
deanhills,

I sometimes get forwarded email from friends who assume they should believe everything they read, and that lots of other people would be interested too. I sometimes go to the trouble of looking them up on an urban myths site, and gently suggest in my reply that the brain should be engaged before clicking the "forward" button.

As you mention these are often bright people, but not used to the anonymity of the Internet where you can say anything with no accountability. Spam emails may be somewhat harder to convincingly debunk, but at least you can send them general warnings about 419 scams, phishing, or whatever. When you are able to get more details about a specific scam, it is well worth the effort to explain carefully, quote reliable sources, and include links.
deanhills
SonLight wrote:
deanhills,

I sometimes get forwarded email from friends who assume they should believe everything they read, and that lots of other people would be interested too. I sometimes go to the trouble of looking them up on an urban myths site, and gently suggest in my reply that the brain should be engaged before clicking the "forward" button.
I agree with you. I also try to help, but it just completely baffles the mind that reasonably intelligent people can be misled by those. If it happens once, then maybe we can understand, but this same friend I mentioned in my previous posting, will next time get a more clever spam, and do exactly the same thing over again. Thankfully he always tells me about this stuff, and maybe the positive at least is that I get to know about new scams. Smile
SonLight
I got an interesting email, probably the beginning of a scam, but there's not enough info to be sure. Here it is if anyone is interested:

Quote:
Hello ,
How are you today and your weekend hope you are alright by the Grace of God, i am dunga from fotolog.com,how is life over your country together with your present condition of health hope all around you is fine,plaese i have something VERY important to tell you.hope to hear from you soon,dunga


I checked it out at spamcop.net. Apparently it was sent from Singapore.

While I can't be sure, I think the sender is hoping I will reply so he or she can verify that my email address is valid. If I replied, the next step would probably be to make me an offer to receive money, hoping to get more personal information and/or an up-front payment from me. If I failed to fall for that, there would still be a small profit in selling my email address as a known active address.

I tried looking up some phrases from the email in Google, but without success. There is no user on fotolog.com with userid "dunga", although there are many whose username begins with dunga. If anyone else wants to try searching, I would suggest that a match might be posted somewhere (besides this forum) soon if a lot of people get similar messages.
deanhills
@SonLight. I would have deleted the e-mail without checking. It is different from the usual, but who wants to reply to a person with the name Dunga? Smile
Bikerman
I recommend that people take the time to read through the following site. It contains a host of good advice, practical examples of best practice and ways to keep yourself safe on-line.
http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/tips/
SonLight
deanhills wrote:
@SonLight. I would have deleted the e-mail without checking. It is different from the usual, but who wants to reply to a person with the name Dunga? Smile


That one didn't get past my "nonsense" filter, but I suppose one might if the perpetrator was smart enough to use reasonable grammar and lucky enough to make it appear they knew me some way. While I do not want my email address in the hands of criminals, I am sure it will leak to them occasionally, perhaps by someones over-broad "forward to" list. Therefore I would probably not hurt myself any even if I did answer such an email, as long as I didn't cave in to any requests for more personal information.

I do tend to study emails that seem unusual, and while I'm pretty skeptical, I might consider answering a questionable one if I thought it might be from a clueless Internet user who really needed advice or help.

@bikerman, that appears to be a useful site. I looked at the information on using the bcc field. If more of my friends followed that advice, I'd probably get on a lot less spammers lists.
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