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Looking for a decent PC





Da Rossa
Hi mates!
My PC is kinda old... it is from 2003. I desperately need something newer.

Although I know how to setup and don't want the hassle of researching the best combination of CPU-Mobo-Memory Type/BUS/Freq.

I'm a multitask man and enjoy gaming and need good storage, but I feel I don't need the ultimate NVIDIA "FIVEDRO FX" solution. I'm looking for a already built PC with no extra components to be bought. Preferably if no poor wiring job! as the title says, no Macs for now please.

And I'm not sure I'll be able to acquire asap. So, if I could do it today, what would be your solution? Smile
ezekiel_rage
Da Rossa wrote:
Hi mates!
My PC is kinda old... it is from 2003. I desperately need something newer.

Although I know how to setup and don't want the hassle of researching the best combination of CPU-Mobo-Memory Type/BUS/Freq.

I'm a multitask man and enjoy gaming and need good storage, but I feel I don't need the ultimate NVIDIA "FIVEDRO FX" solution. I'm looking for a already built PC with no extra components to be bought. Preferably if no poor wiring job! as the title says, no Macs for now please.

And I'm not sure I'll be able to acquire asap. So, if I could do it today, what would be your solution? Smile


for more bang for your bucks, i suggest get an AMD based PC.

they have relatively lower cost than Intel-based setups but you can get a lot when it comes to performance.

I suggest getting a Phenom II X3 720 or Phenom II X4 820.

A motherboard with at least an AMD 785G chipset.

This chipset supports DDR3 memory and crossfire & hybrid crossfire.

The integrated Radeon HD 4200 that comes with this chipset can handle most games at medium settings. If you decide to go for dedicated graphics, you can set this up for hybrid crossfire.

Now if you want a good pre-built pc, i suggest getting a DELL XPS or better yet go for an Alienware
adri
How much are you willing to spend on this new computer? Do you want a pre-made computer (from companies such as dell, HP,...) or something you put together yourself (cheaper and you get to do the wiring Razz ).


adri
Da Rossa
Actually I have no determined budget. I'm willing to spend a... reasonable ammount of cash, this means this will be no lottery award but I would never get a $500 machine.

And, like I said, I'd like this to be premade and not setup by me, although I'm able to do it.

@ ezekiel:
Thanks for the suggestions. This brings us to an old question, but always recycled: why are AMD-based computers so better in cost x effectiveness? And why does Intel still have such a bigger market share with so much more expensive setups? This is a newbie question but.. as of now, are the AMD CPUs as good as the Intels? Smile
william
Are you completely sure about not building one yourself? If you're worried about researching a good combination of parts, there are dozens of recommended PC component lists for different tasks and price ranges out there. It really wouldn't take more than an hour or two to end up with a very solid configuration plan.

Now, if you're set on an already built PC, then I'm not the best in suggesting brands (since I really only use custom now). Of the mainstream brands, Dell isn't too bad (seems less limiting than others) but companies like Cyperpower and iBuyPower (just to name a few) might be worth looking at, because they in essence take off the shelf components and put something together for you and provide a warranty.

It's tough to make component recommendations without knowing a price. AMD systems are pretty good for lower budgets, especially since their Phenom X6 processors are really solid for multithreaded work (such as video editing). However, if you want the best performance, Intel's i7 lineup still reigns as the performance king. As for whether AMD CPUs are as good as Intel CPU, well, it really depends. At the top end, Intel is still more powerful, but in midrange and lower end applications, AMD chips can match or nearly match their Intel counterparts. The best bit about AMD is bang for the buck, so you may not be getting something faster than an Intel chip, but you very well may be getting a better deal.

Also, you did mention gaming. Are there any specific games or genres you're into? The competition between ATI and nVidia has been fierce, so we as consumers are winning out with pretty incredible deals.
Da Rossa
Hum, no, I'm not absolutely sure I don't want a custom built; in fact, I wish I had time and also I wish I were updated about the latest things. Where can I find good component lists? The thing I'm worried about right now is to get good stuff but in a bad combination.

Genres of games? Well, I like FPS and RTS such as the old Age of Empires style.
adri
Da Rossa wrote:
Where can I find good component lists? The thing I'm worried about right now is to get good stuff but in a bad combination.


I know one good decent hardware website in english and that is Tom's Hardware (I do know several dutch websites but because you can't read dutch they are no good :/ ). I just looked a bit at the website and it looks like they have some system configurations available. You can be pretty sure of it that those systems work.

http://www.tomshardware.com/system-configuration-recommendation-54.html

You can also click on every component to see some specifications of that product. (Like for example: The cpu has socket 1156, so has the motherboard -> they fit Smile ).

adri Smile
Da Rossa
thanks! I knew about Tom's, but I could barely remember it! Been a long since I last visited it.

Anyone has any extra suggestions? Smile
william
Yeah, Tom's Hardware has the better and more up to date lists. If you search specific computer dedicated forums (such as Overclockers, [H]ardOCP, Overclock.net along with Tom's Hardware), you can find tons of build recommendations for other people, and I know some of these forums had similar lists to Tom's Hardware. And of course, you could post there yourself, and you'll get plenty of good suggestions (given that you have a good idea on how much you're willing to spend).
buildarigs
Da Rossa wrote:
Hi mates!
My PC is kinda old... it is from 2003. I desperately need something newer.

Although I know how to setup and don't want the hassle of researching the best combination of CPU-Mobo-Memory Type/BUS/Freq.

I'm a multitask man and enjoy gaming and need good storage, but I feel I don't need the ultimate NVIDIA "FIVEDRO FX" solution. I'm looking for a already built PC with no extra components to be bought. Preferably if no poor wiring job! as the title says, no Macs for now please.

And I'm not sure I'll be able to acquire asap. So, if I could do it today, what would be your solution? Smile


I can help i have a blog site giving pc specs you can it hope it'll helps you, just visit www.diyrigs.com
Da Rossa
Tip noted!
And good site, seems to be a good personal contribution for the people's knowledge! Smile
The-Nisk
I'm might be able to help you out, my company offers custom system assembly.
We essentially determine what the customer wants from their machine, then we ourselves hunt for parts, then offer what setup we think is best and then we make further customizations/changes based on user-feedback.

Now, our main focus is Extreme system assembly, for extreme gamers and professional graphic designers etc, but I'm always willing to push the boundaries of mid-level builds Smile

Let me know if you're interested or even just want some advice/guidelines Smile
Da Rossa
Well unfortunately I've got no deep pockets to buy a designer's rig or a extreme gamer, but I, just in dremas, built up this configuration at Newegg:

http://notasdeaula.org/pcnewegg

(I saved up there for a while)

Please let me know if I'm too outdated to build my own PC, and tell me please I you think this PC above matches the description I asked for in the opening post Smile
william
Good start. A few tips. For starters, while Newegg has good daily prices, there are always ways to get better deals. So don't limit yourself to just Newegg.

Anyway, to the parts.

-Caviar Black is a good drive, but I'd suggest the cheaper Samsung Spinpoint F3. It's cheaper (around $60) and slightly faster. Also seems to get higher customer ratings than the WD.

-Seagate Barracuda is overpriced. I've seen 2 TB drives go for much less than that, closer to $100.

-HD5850 is still a good card, good price on that. But if you bargain hunt, GTX 470s can be had for the same price. They run warmer and consume a bit more power, but are just a hair under the HD5870s in performance. Also, the HD6000 series are out, so if you can find an HD6870 for a similar price, go for it. (Note HD6850s are slower than HD5850s).

-The power supply isn't bad, but for around the same price, you could get a Corsair HX-750, which is widely regarded as one of the best in the business.

-Lycosa is cheaper on Amazon. I've never used one myself, but I have seen a lot of complaints about glitches when typing. May want to consider Logitechs' G15 and G110. It's personal preference though, but I'd look at a couple reviews on this one, just to be sure the glitches aren't a problem anymore.

-For the RAM, get triple channel (three sticks). This means you could get either 6 GB or 12 GB, but it'll take advantage of the X58 chipset. Oh, whoa, I just noted that the sticks you chose come with a fan. Nice, but a bit overkill if you don't do some serious overclocking.

-For the CPU, by any chance do you live near a MicroCenter? If you do, then you're in luck, they sell it for only $200. Also, do you plan on overclocking at all? If so, you may want to get an aftermarket cooler.

-Oh, and optical drive. You could get a Lightscribe drive for about $10 less than that without any tradeoffs. And that one is IDE, you want SATA.

Just some thoughts. With a few tweaks, it's a good build, and I'm willing to bet it can be brought closer to $1500.
Da Rossa
Thanks a lot William!

Quote:
Good start. A few tips. For starters, while Newegg has good daily prices, there are always ways to get better deals. So don't limit yourself to just Newegg.


But I got newegg because 1- there are plenty of stuff so I can get a reference on the price and 2- there is a wishlist/cart in which I can gather the things to sum up and list Smile

Quote:
-Caviar Black is a good drive, but I'd suggest the cheaper Samsung Spinpoint F3. It's cheaper (around $60) and slightly faster. Also seems to get higher customer ratings than the WD.

-Seagate Barracuda is overpriced. I've seen 2 TB drives go for much less than that, closer to $100.


I changed the WD for the Samsung SPinpoint F3. However, as for the Seagate Barracuda, I couldn't find, in there, other SATA 6GB/second besides SG or WD... I already dropped the Sata 6 to 3Gb/s...

Quote:
-HD5850 is still a good card, good price on that. But if you bargain hunt, GTX 470s can be had for the same price. They run warmer and consume a bit more power, but are just a hair under the HD5870s in performance. Also, the HD6000 series are out, so if you can find an HD6870 for a similar price, go for it. (Note HD6850s are slower than HD5850s).


Since I didn't find a 5870(s), I went for the 6850.

Quote:
-The power supply isn't bad, but for around the same price, you could get a Corsair HX-750, which is widely regarded as one of the best in the business.


Added to the experiment.

Quote:
-Lycosa is cheaper on Amazon. I've never used one myself, but I have seen a lot of complaints about glitches when typing. May want to consider Logitechs' G15 and G110. It's personal preference though, but I'd look at a couple reviews on this one, just to be sure the glitches aren't a problem anymore.


I can give up on the keyboard since I would have to use stickers to adapt to the Brazilian ABNT2 layout...

Quote:
-For the RAM, get triple channel (three sticks). This means you could get either 6 GB or 12 GB, but it'll take advantage of the X58 chipset. Oh, whoa, I just noted that the sticks you chose come with a fan. Nice, but a bit overkill if you don't do some serious overclocking.


As you can see, I'm a lot outdated. I can't even think about OCing for now.

Quote:
-For the RAM, get triple channel (three sticks). This means you could get either 6 GB or 12 GB, but it'll take advantage of the X58 chipset. Oh, whoa, I just noted that the sticks you chose come with a fan. Nice, but a bit overkill if you don't do some serious overclocking.


Replaced by Kingston HyperX T1 Series 6GB (3 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1800 (PC3 14400) Desktop Memory Model KHX1800C9D3T1FK3/6GX.

Quote:
-For the CPU, by any chance do you live near a MicroCenter? If you do, then you're in luck, they sell it for only $200. Also, do you plan on overclocking at all? If so, you may want to get an aftermarket cooler.


Not even aware of what "MicroCenter" is. A shop maybe?
And I chose one with a bundled cooler because it would be one less hassle, and a sensitive one. I fear coolers! Smile What cooler would you suggest? Not planning to OC.

Quote:
-Oh, and optical drive. You could get a Lightscribe drive for about $10 less than that without any tradeoffs. And that one is IDE, you want SATA.


My goodness this was sloppy Razz I even noticed the price was too low! Changed to ASUS Black SATA 24X Burner with E-Hammer Software LightScribe Support - OEM.

So, until a new clue on the CPU/cooler, the new output is here: http://notasdeaula.org/pcnewegg2
william
Understood about Newegg. But when you go to buy, just be sure to check out other prices. Very Happy

For the hard drives, I'd a bit weary to suggest Barracudas because they seem to be strangely unreliable. Even though this drive is a SATA 6 GB/s, it can never reach those speeds. It's just not capable of reaching those speeds. SSDs can't even take full advantage of those speeds. You shouldn't have any trouble with SATA 3 GB/s. I take it you want to use this drive as a storage drive, correct? If that's the case, you may be better off getting two 1.5 TB drives. These only cost $55 (for now) and are 1.5 TB. They may have compatibility issues with Windows XP, so you may want to look at some other, similar, drives, but this is just to give you an idea. $170 for 2 TB is really too much.

For the graphics card, stick with the HD5850. The HD6850 is actually a downgrade, and a replacement for the HD5770. (ATI changed the naming scheme around a bit). If you get one of the HD6000 series cards, get the HD6870.

And yeah, MicroCenter is a shop. I didn't realize you were in Brazil (since you were using Newegg prices). So nevermind that, then. The CPU itself is good, and comes with Intel's stock cooler. My experience with this cooler is that it's adequate, but that's about it. If you're not overclocking, you won't need anything more, but I often suggest the Coolermaster Hyper 212+ for inexpensive cooling. It was recently being sold for under $20 and has proved capable in getting systems near 4 GHz if you ever plan on doing so. It's a big step over the standard cooler.

With a good cooler, you have a very capable overclocking system (i7 + RAM + Sabertooth = great combination). If it's something you want to dive into, a mild-moderate overclock is easily attainable. Not saying that you should jump into it right away, but rather that you have the option open whenever you please. Very Happy
Da Rossa
Quote:
For the hard drives, I'd a bit weary to suggest Barracudas because they seem to be strangely unreliable.


Appears to be true. My cousin's has just stopped working.

Quote:
For the graphics card, stick with the HD5850. The HD6850 is actually a downgrade, and a replacement for the HD5770. (ATI changed the naming scheme around a bit). If you get one of the HD6000 series cards, get the HD6870.


Video Cards are the most confusing thing nowadays. Is there a particular manufacturer you'd like to recommend? If so, why? I chose XFX for the price, since my knowledge for now is limited.

Quote:
And yeah, MicroCenter is a shop. I didn't realize you were in Brazil (since you were using Newegg prices). So nevermind that, then. The CPU itself is good, and comes with Intel's stock cooler. My experience with this cooler is that it's adequate, but that's about it. If you're not overclocking, you won't need anything more, but I often suggest the Coolermaster Hyper 212+ for inexpensive cooling. It was recently being sold for under $20 and has proved capable in getting systems near 4 GHz if you ever plan on doing so. It's a big step over the standard cooler.

With a good cooler, you have a very capable overclocking system (i7 + RAM + Sabertooth = great combination). If it's something you want to dive into, a mild-moderate overclock is easily attainable. Not saying that you should jump into it right away, but rather that you have the option open whenever you please. Very Happy


It's even nicer to have the possibility of OCing, although there are no plans. That's not that noisy buzz is it?

What else am I forgetting when considering this new PC?

Edit:
The output for now:
http://notasdeaula.org/pcnewegg3
Not that I chose a similar HDD. Please tell me if the one chosen has problems.

Besides that, do you have anything to comment on the monitor and about the possibility of getting a NVidia graphics card?
william
Quote:
Appears to be true. My cousin's has just stopped working.


I actually just had a Barracuda fail on me last week. Confused I was able to recover the data, though.


Quote:
Video Cards are the most confusing thing nowadays. Is there a particular manufacturer you'd like to recommend? If so, why? I chose XFX for the price, since my knowledge for now is limited.


For ATI the good ones are Asus, MSI, and Sapphire. For nVidia: EVGA, Asus, and MSI. Gigabyte is also good. I used to recommend XFX cards all the time, but not too long ago they sold defective cards and didn't honor warranties. Their poor service prevents me from suggesting them again. Asus, MSI, Sapphire, EVGA, and Gigabyte all make quality cards and offer excellent warranty and support, some better than others.

Quote:
It's even nicer to have the possibility of OCing, although there are no plans. That's not that noisy buzz is it?


I'm not sure what you mean by noisy buzz. Do you mean some sort of a high pitched electrical whine?

Quote:
What else am I forgetting when considering this new PC?


I think you've got everything, minus peripherals and software.

Quote:
Not that I chose a similar HDD. Please tell me if the one chosen has problems.


Unfortunately, this one does have one issue: compatibility issues with XP and potentially some hard drive management programs because it uses 4k sectors instead of .5k sectors. Also, as a storage drive it's fine, but it is a bit slow if you intend on using it as an OS drive. Reliability isn't bad so far as I know. I've noted many WDs tend to be dead on arrival, but if they don't fail then, they seem to last long. I've never had a Caviar fail on me for what it's worth. I'd say it's a better buy than the Seagate, but I'd be wary of the sector issue (unless someone found a solution since I've last looked).

Quote:
Besides that, do you have anything to comment on the monitor and about the possibility of getting a NVidia graphics card?


Monitor is good, heard very good things about it. Unless you want a higher resolution or something with precise color accuracy, it's a good display. As for nVidia graphics cards, as I said you could potentially get a GTX 470 for a little more. It runs warmer, uses a bit more power, supports CUDA, and nearly matches the HD5870. A GTX460 is slightly slower than the HD5850, but also cheaper. That's a good alternative if you go with nVidia.
Da Rossa
Quote:
For ATI the good ones are Asus, MSI, and Sapphire. For nVidia: EVGA, Asus, and MSI. Gigabyte is also good. I used to recommend XFX cards all the time, but not too long ago they sold defective cards and didn't honor warranties. Their poor service prevents me from suggesting them again. Asus, MSI, Sapphire, EVGA, and Gigabyte all make quality cards and offer excellent warranty and support, some better than others.


Then I chose this one, going straight to a NVidia (GTX 460):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121389

Quote:
I'm not sure what you mean by noisy buzz. Do you mean some sort of a high pitched electrical whine?


I mean the natural fan rotational noise. Some are like airplane engines.

Quote:
I think you've got everything, minus peripherals and software.


I'm intending to deal with peripherals in here, except for the mouse. And I'm picky about the mouse. Should be comfortable for using for many hours, being precise, good for gaming and precision programs. Is that that Lachesis a good choice for it?

Quote:
Unfortunately, this one does have one issue: compatibility issues with XP and potentially some hard drive management programs because it uses 4k sectors instead of .5k sectors. Also, as a storage drive it's fine, but it is a bit slow if you intend on using it as an OS drive. Reliability isn't bad so far as I know. I've noted many WDs tend to be dead on arrival, but if they don't fail then, they seem to last long. I've never had a Caviar fail on me for what it's worth. I'd say it's a better buy than the Seagate, but I'd be wary of the sector issue (unless someone found a solution since I've last looked).


Then the solution would be making the Spinpoint F3 a dupe! Smile

What do you think now? This is output #4: http://notasdeaula.org/output4
william
Quote:
Then I chose this one, going straight to a NVidia (GTX 460):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121389


Cool. That's a good card. It will be slightly slower than the 5850, but only marginally, and you do get some benefits (such as CUDA and a more versatile drivers). And it seems to be factory overclocked with a nice cooler added on.

Quote:
I mean the natural fan rotational noise. Some are like airplane engines.


Oh I see what you mean. Believe it or not, a high end aftermarket cooler that's designed to run CPUs at 4 GHz+ is often quieter than the stock cooler (unless you get very high RPM fans). But of course, if you overclock, the heat will cause the fans to run harder, making it louder than stock.

Quote:
I'm intending to deal with peripherals in here, except for the mouse. And I'm picky about the mouse. Should be comfortable for using for many hours, being precise, good for gaming and precision programs. Is that that Lachesis a good choice for it?


With mice it's really personal preference, and how you grasp the mouse, be it claw or palm. (See here). I personally have liked Razer mice for my hands, but I know many people who hate them and prefer something along the lines of a Logitech MX518. Best thing to do, if possible, is try out a mouse before buying.

Quote:
Then the solution would be making the Spinpoint F3 a dupe!


That works too. Very Happy Just keep an eye out for deals, larger, reliable, drives do come for around $60 all the time. But they won't be as fast as the Samsung (which isn't a problem if you're looking for a storage drive).

Quote:
What do you think now? This is output #4: http://notasdeaula.org/output4


Looks pretty good to me. Oh, and any reason you chose an Open Box motherboard? The board itself is very good, but just wondering why you chose the open box one. Do you plan on ordering parts from Newegg? Beyond that though, great configuration. Cool

Perhaps other users may want to chime in as well? Unless better deals come along, this seems like a solid system.
Da Rossa
About mice: Kinda difficult since in here we seldom see decent mice in stores, so we can't handle. People that acquire in here do over the internet or abroad.

About the open box: my mistake.

About combinations: do both the memory and that nvidia GPU fit that Mobo? I thought, at first, that "X58" had something to do with ATI.

About the HDD: appears to be kinda difficult to find different and larger HDs with come close to the spinpoint you recommended. The only with 2TB is not 7200rpm: http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=100006519%2050001077%2040000014%20600003269&IsNodeId=1&name=1TB%20and%20higher

We're almost there Very Happy

Edit:

Just built almost the same setup at Amazon. check it out: http://notasdeaula.org/outputamazon
william
Alright, well, what type of grip do you have when you grasp a mouse? That should help find something comfortable for you. (Here).

Memory and GPU fit the motherboard just fine. X58 is an Intel chipset that supports Socket 1366 processors, DDR3 RAM, and both ATI and nVidia cards (Crossfire and SLI included).

For the hard drives, I figured you were originally going to make the Samsung drive your OS drive and the other one was going to be your storage drive. Am I correct on this assumption? If so, then you don't necessarily need the fastest drive for storage, and for the same price as the Samsung you could get larger drives. In any case, I see nothing wrong with buying multiple Spinpoints.

That Amazon configuration also looks good, some prices are better than Newegg. Actually, I never asked, is there anything you're looking for in a case? (I've never used the XCLIO but have worked with a couple of Nine Hundreds).
Da Rossa
Quote:
For the hard drives, I figured you were originally going to make the Samsung drive your OS drive and the other one was going to be your storage drive. Am I correct on this assumption? If so, then you don't necessarily need the fastest drive for storage, and for the same price as the Samsung you could get larger drives. In any case, I see nothing wrong with buying multiple Spinpoints.

That Amazon configuration also looks good, some prices are better than Newegg. Actually, I never asked, is there anything you're looking for in a case? (I've never used the XCLIO but have worked with a couple of Nine Hundreds).


About the drives: Yeah, you know you're right about the assumption! But some friend of mine, back in 2003, which owned a lan house, was eager to recommend me not to acquire a Samsung HD, but told me to buy a Samsung monitor. Not sure if tings have changed since then. And yes, I'd like a larger drive for storage, but please, reliable! Very Happy

Case: I like large cases, but not a must. I like space and don't like the wires to fill a significant percentage of the internal volume. The case is the thing I examined the least. I must have at least one usb connector in front, preferably two. And a good design...
william
Da Rossa wrote:

About the drives: Yeah, you know you're right about the assumption! But some friend of mine, back in 2003, which owned a lan house, was eager to recommend me not to acquire a Samsung HD, but told me to buy a Samsung monitor. Not sure if tings have changed since then. And yes, I'd like a larger drive for storage, but please, reliable! Very Happy

Case: I like large cases, but not a must. I like space and don't like the wires to fill a significant percentage of the internal volume. The case is the thing I examined the least. I must have at least one usb connector in front, preferably two. And a good design...


You know, before, I never suggested any Samsung drives. But their new ones are actually quite surprising. If I recall correctly, it was the only drive with a 5 egg rating when I bought one. Every site I've been to recommends it, so unless they're all wrong about something (perhaps Samsung is just messing with us and they're all ticking time bombs Twisted Evil ) it should be a great drive. It's the best drive I've ever owned, that's for sure. But the thing is, plenty of Western Digital Caviars come on sale for a bit more than the Samsung with 1.5 TB of space, and most of them are pretty reliable. But, like all hard drives, there is no guarantee that it won't fail, some are just better than others.

Most cases will have two USB connectors up front. Again, I can't comment on the XCLIO, but the Nine Hundred isn't a huge case. It'll take in four graphics cards, nine drives, a large cooler, and can be set up to run on water, so it'll fit nearly everything you throw at it, but it will be very cramped. And unfortunately, especially for the Nine Hundred, cable management is rather subpar (the Nine Hundred Two is a bit better). I mean, you can have a clean case, but just be prepared to use extensions and if you're really picky, cut a few holes. I'm not trying to deter you from the Nine Hundred, but just saying that cable management isn't the best, and if you're looking for a large case, this probably isn't it. However, it will have absolutely no trouble at all taking in your parts, You will have plenty of room to spare. And the cooling is fantastic and it's well built. But if you really do want a larger case, there's also the Antec Twelve Hundred (12 drive bays) and some cases from CoolerMaster, namely the HAF series among others.
Da Rossa
Quote:
You know, before, I never suggested any Samsung drives. But their new ones are actually quite surprising. If I recall correctly, it was the only drive with a 5 egg rating when I bought one. Every site I've been to recommends it, so unless they're all wrong about something (perhaps Samsung is just messing with us and they're all ticking time bombs Twisted Evil ) it should be a great drive. It's the best drive I've ever owned, that's for sure. But the thing is, plenty of Western Digital Caviars come on sale for a bit more than the Samsung with 1.5 TB of space, and most of them are pretty reliable. But, like all hard drives, there is no guarantee that it won't fail, some are just better than others.


Tip noted!

About the cases: I did a perfunctory look at the four options (900, 900-2, 1200 and the current XClio), and found the 1200 the most kick-ass one. But it is a little pricier, and I believe its not work on a case. Then I think the xclio would fit better for this system.

Is everything talked about? Very Happy
william
Sounds good. This is another case that falls within the same price range (Coolermaster HAF 922). It might interest you. Cooling is stellar (HAF stands for High Airflow) and it's pretty expandable with good cable management. Just another thought if you hadn't looked at it. Otherwise, the XCLIO seems pretty decent.

And I believe we've talked about everything...except one thing. I sort of lost track of the dates, but CES 2011 is January 5, 2011, and Intel will be releasing Sandy Bridge, their new microprocessor architecture. This means new sockets, new processors, and new motherboards. If you can wait for maybe a month, I think it might be a good idea. I don't know about prices, and it will most likely come out to be a little more than your current configuration. I apologize for not bringing this up earlier, I was reading an article about Sandy yesterday and realized it was coming out sooner than I had recalled.

If you can't or choose not to wait, then your current configuration is fantastic.
william
Sounds good. This is another case that falls within the same price range (Coolermaster HAF 922). It might interest you. Cooling is stellar (HAF stands for High Airflow) and it's pretty expandable with good cable management. Just another thought if you hadn't looked at it. Otherwise, the XCLIO seems pretty decent.

And I believe we've talked about everything...except one thing. I sort of lost track of the dates, but CES 2011 is January 5, 2011, and Intel will be releasing Sandy Bridge, their new microprocessor architecture. This means new sockets, new processors, and new motherboards. If you can wait for maybe a month, I think it might be a good idea. I don't know about prices, and it will most likely come out to be a little more than your current configuration. I apologize for not bringing this up earlier, I was reading an article about Sandy yesterday and realized it was coming out sooner than I had recalled.

If you can't or choose not to wait, then your current configuration is fantastic.

Edit: Blah, first it said I couldn't post so soon (I hadn't posted) and then it double posted. And now I can't delete this one.
hersandal
If you need a good PC try searching for a site that give you a selection of parts and peripherals for the CPU Unit and after all the selection, it will give you a total price of all the items you have chosen for you pc.
Da Rossa
And which one would you recommend?
Da Rossa
Quote:
Sounds good. This is another case that falls within the same price range (Coolermaster HAF 922). It might interest you. Cooling is stellar (HAF stands for High Airflow) and it's pretty expandable with good cable management. Just another thought if you hadn't looked at it. Otherwise, the XCLIO seems pretty decent.

And I believe we've talked about everything...except one thing. I sort of lost track of the dates, but CES 2011 is January 5, 2011, and Intel will be releasing Sandy Bridge, their new microprocessor architecture. This means new sockets, new processors, and new motherboards. If you can wait for maybe a month, I think it might be a good idea. I don't know about prices, and it will most likely come out to be a little more than your current configuration. I apologize for not bringing this up earlier, I was reading an article about Sandy yesterday and realized it was coming out sooner than I had recalled.

If you can't or choose not to wait, then your current configuration is fantastic.


Didn't see this post when I saw hersandal's. HAF 922 has a nice looking design! MAybe chosen as well.

As for the news about Sandy Bridge, don't worry about the timing. As I said in the first post, this setup is more like an experiment since there is no guarantee I'll be at the US by next month... I was only planning, but gotta get things ready with my family. So it seems great news that Intel is launching it next month.

The problem is, since it's a new thing, then I won't have a William to talk about his experience so fast! Sad And we won't be able to tell what is the best choice that early. What do you think?
william
Heh heh, got it.

And don't worry, I tend to stay up to date with these things via reviews and forums, so as long as someone trustworthy and experienced has gotten his/her hands on it, I should still be able to put out recommendations. Wink

One thing is, your current configuration uses Socket 1366. What's coming out in January is Socket 1155, which is replacing Socket 1156. So technically, the mainstream stuff is coming out now at the enthusiast stuff is due later in the year. The question, of course, is will a new mainstream platform work out better than a current gen enthusiast platform? Based on early benchmarks, the answer is most likely "yes" since clock for clock, the new architecture seems to be a step ahead.
Da Rossa
Err, I'm a bit confused now.

First of all, what are the pratical (relevant) differences between the socket 1156 and 1366? As far as my "knowledge knows", socket numbers are just a way to group compatible processors to a motherboard. There was the socket 775 in the past, socket 7, and so on. Is there any logic or algorithm to explain the socket #s?

I deeply beg your pardon for not understanding what you meant about the mainstream x enthusiasts. Do you mean the enthisiast configuration of today become the mainstream of tomorrow and so on?

In the case you're talking, are you saying that the new "ordinarily available setups" will be better than the current "enthusiast" (more powerful than the average) setups?
william
Sorry for not being clear. You are right, socket numbers are a way to group compatible processors. Socket numbers, at least in the case of 775, 1156, 1155, and 1366, are determined by the number of pins the chip has. It's not always based on number of pins, but in these cases it is.

The other thing is, the P55 platform uses Socket 1156 while the X58 uses Socket 1366. Now, P55 is more a mainstream chipset, whereas X58 is an enthusiast chipset. P55 supports i3, i5, and i7 processors (but not the high end i7s, like the hexacores). X58 with Socket 1366 only supports i7. Another difference is that X58 supports triple channel, P55 does not. Also, X58 supports 40 PCI-E lanes, allowing you to run two graphics cards at 16x, whereas P55 will not be able to do so. There are a few other differences as well, but many argue that the P55 is a better value because it's not that far behind in performance and it's cheaper. Although, if you ask me, with the deals on X58 boards and Socket 1366 i7s, X58 will only cost a little bit more. I feel it's worth it. So the X58 is currently the enthusiast platform while P55 is a more mainstream platform.

Anyway, what I'm saying is that the next mainstream platform (that will replace P55) is coming out this January with Socket 1155 Sandy Bridge processors. The question is, will this new mainstream platform be able to outclass the current enthusiast platform, the X58. Based on early test results, it very well might be able to. You will of course have to opt for the high end Socket 1155 processors to compete with an X58 setup.

Let me know if I need to clarify anything else. Very Happy
Da Rossa
Now things are clearer! Very Happy

Just to sum up: Socket 1156 < Socket 1366 < Socket 1155 ?

And, if I get a Socket 1155-based CPU, then will I have to chose new memory and graphic card models? (The mobo is obvious).
william
Quote:
Just to sum up: Socket 1156 < Socket 1366 < Socket 1155


Maybe. See, Socket 1155 will be the new replacement for Socket 1366. In theory, 1366 should remain ahead in some aspects because it still has higher frequency chips and a hexacore model, but clock for clock (ie 3.1 GHz 1366 vs 3.1 GHz 1155), 1155 will be ahead thanks to the new architecture. In Q3 2011, Socket 1366 will be replaced by Socket 2011. 2011 will be the socket for the next generation of enthusiast chips, also based on the new Sandy Bridge Architecture. Until then, though, the true high end remains with 1366.

And if you get a Socket 1155, graphics card can remain the same. RAM might have to change slightly if it doesn't support triple channel. I don't recall if that has been announced yet, but we'll know by the Consumer Electronics Show.
Da Rossa
Hmmm.

I think we have everyting set except for the mouse handling/grip for Razer. Trust me, I didn't come to a conclusion!

Then, here we go to the most important question of all: when I posted the first buylist, you said "hmm good start". What exactly did you mean, since we changed the configuration substantially? Did you mean that I "had a notion", that I "had a good intention", that I "had my feet on the ground", what? Very Happy
william
Heh, well I guess I could make some mice suggestions, but I tend not to just because comfort varies from person to person.

And when I said "good start" what I meant is that you were on the right track (good chipset, good processor, all parts fit well with each other, etc.). In general, the parts you had chosen made a very good computer, and only needed a few minor changes here and there (to give you what you have now). I mean, some things really were minor, like Caviar Black to Spinpoint F3 was to get a little more speed and save a little bit of money, but both are very good drives. Original power supply was also good, but the Corsair is generally considered a better buy. Things like that. Very Happy
Da Rossa
Good, that's a very nice thing, since now I know I haven't lost track of what a decent computer is! Very Happy

Consider your hand shaken William!
william
Glad to have been of help. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. Very Happy
Da Rossa
Sure I will, Will!
Are you always around this area here @ Fri?
william
I always lurk Frihost, and most often the Hardware section, so yeah I check this section about as often as I check any other forum.

For future reference, edits throughout this thread were made to attach signatures.
Da Rossa
Not that you need points or that I've been 'convoked' by somebody to do it, but how about endeavoring through the other areas in this forum? From relationships, through philosophy to politics!
william
A few years ago I used to post all over the forum (but still Hardware dominant). I'm trying to get back into that habit, but for the forums you listed:

-Relationships: I don't know anything about this subject. Razz
-Philosophy: I've lurked, and really don't want to get myself into that. Wink
-Politics: Could do, but I post on Frihost for leisure, and I never found politics very leisurely.

But I will post in other places, I'm just most helpful here.
Da Rossa
Relationships: one more reason to take a look in there. Why not stepping by and asking some questions?
Philosophy: really, some people don't want to be persuaded.
Politics: I understand it is not a 'leisurable' thing.

But in all three, you could improve yourself even more. And they are just examples!

Err, back to the subject: right now it happened to me to ask if that system is safe to be left powered for two weeks while I use batch video editing software or stuff like that (ones that fill 99,9% of your CPU time). No risk of "explosion", overheat, lifetime reduction and so on?
william
Da Rossa wrote:
Relationships: one more reason to take a look in there. Why not stepping by and asking some questions?
Philosophy: really, some people don't want to be persuaded.
Politics: I understand it is not a 'leisurable' thing.

But in all three, you could improve yourself even more. And they are just examples!


I know what you mean, but philosophy and politics are things that I do discuss with others all the time. It's just not something I'm bothered to do over the internet, is all. Relationships, well true knowledge exists in knowing you know nothing. Wink And for what it's worth, I'm on dozens of forums, and with Frihost I just have a tendency to post wherever I'm helpful. Back when there was a lot more activity, I would post almost everywhere. But anyway...

Quote:
Err, back to the subject: right now it happened to me to ask if that system is safe to be left powered for two weeks while I use batch video editing software or stuff like that (ones that fill 99,9% of your CPU time). No risk of "explosion", overheat, lifetime reduction and so on?


I've done it for a couple of days (at full CPU load) but I have run computers nonstop for weeks. As long as your cooling is adequate (clean vents, functioning fans, etc.) and you maintain safe temperatures, there shouldn't be any problem. At full load, with most of my machines, I'm running in the mid 70s, which is fine for these CPUs (designed to go up to 100 degrees).
Da Rossa
Quote:
I know what you mean, but philosophy and politics are things that I do discuss with others all the time. It's just not something I'm bothered to do over the internet, is all. Relationships, well true knowledge exists in knowing you know nothing. Wink And for what it's worth, I'm on dozens of forums, and with Frihost I just have a tendency to post wherever I'm helpful. Back when there was a lot more activity, I would post almost everywhere. But anyway...


I understand your point of view about true knowledge. Smile

Thanks on the clarification about temperatures. Smile
william
Oh yeah, I should say that while these CPUs are designed to go up to 100 degrees, that is where they shut off. Beyond that and you may damage it. As a guideline, try to keep the cores below 80 degrees. I don't recall off the top of my head how well the stock i7 cooler manages it at full load, but I don't think it goes any higher than the low 80s.
Da Rossa
Stability is the main concern about this. Sometimes I leave the PC working at demanding applications such as video converting software, and other times I leave the PC on when defragmenting, stuff like that.
william
To be honest, with stability the problem always arose from Windows, not the hardware. But a stock CPU with adequate cooling will be perfectly stable. If you want to make sure of this, there are a number of stress tests you can run (eg. LinX, OCCT, Prime95, etc.) that will determine stability. But again, stock CPUs should never have a problem.
Da Rossa
Got curious: could you tell me more about those stress tests? And if it's "safe" (appears to be a illogical question) to test in my current PC. I was really unaware of them.
william
They are safe, basically they'll catch any instability issues before they happen when you're doing actual work. They're primarily used by overclockers to check how stable their voltage/frequency/other settings are. A stock CPU should pass them all, if it doesn't then something is wrong.

One thing about them, some of them will tax your CPU harder than you ever will in real world usage, so again it is used for precautions.

Here are the ones I mentioned
LinX
Prime95
OCCT

Again, like I said they are used by overclockers and a stock setup will almost definitely pass them. But in case you want to make sure, these are the ones you want to use.
promjena
Out of experience with all kinds of laptops/desktops/servers I would say Dell's Business line of laptops id the top notch .. first they are dependable, quality built, easy to fix and parts are cheap .. and on top of that they have great warranty's that will cover the whole laptop should anything happen.. If you were to buy one next time give Dell laptops a try.. also there is this site I buy my dell parts from .. they also carry dell's business line of laptops you can check them out at http://www.capital-remarketing.com
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