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Cold Cathode Lighting for non-pc usage?





[FuN]goku
Okay, so, I've recently taken an interest into cold cathode lights. It seems like most of them are for use with PC's, for case lighting and such.

I'm just wondering, Is there any way I could hook a bunch up, and have it just plugged into the wall?
I want to place a bunch of them around my wall in my room, or hell, just around my desk even. I was considering LED lights, but they just don't seem the same at all.
ocalhoun
Well, if they're made for PC's, they probably work with 12VDC power.

So, all you need to do is provide that, and mount them.

For a small number of them, you could use an ordinary transformer block, like this one:

(Just look at the label on it to make sure that the output is 12V DC.)

For a larger number, you'd need a computer power supply. Use the old AT type rather than the ATX type, because an AT type will be easier to wire a power switch to.

For a huge number, you'd need an industrial rectifier, or just lots of smaller power supplies.
[FuN]goku
Alright Cool! Hopefully I can get some ordered soon. They look so awesome.
weableandbob
Yes, a 12v DC power supply should do fine as long as you take care to wire them in parallel-series will cause them to share the voltage instead of the amps and cause them to glow faintly/not at all. They work surprisingly well on FRC robots, as well =)
Nemesis234
weableandbob wrote:
Yes, a 12v DC power supply should do fine as long as you take care to wire them in parallel-series will cause them to share the voltage instead of the amps and cause them to glow faintly/not at all. They work surprisingly well on FRC robots, as well =)

parallel series is a bit of a conradiction, they should all be in parallel to ensure they are all fed 12v or whatever the positive rail is set to.

also ensure you purchase a power supply which can supply enough amps CONSTANTLY, carefull because some may quote burst figures which are misleading

power(watts) = voltage x current
current = power/voltage

use these to work out how many lights you can have, if you wire them in parallel as in the picture just add all the current/power requirements of the lights together, then check you wont burn out your power supply

then check again.
ocalhoun
-Forgot to mention, if you want to use them in your car, it would be very easy.
Since most* cars have a 12V DC electrical system, all you'd have to do is wire it in along with an on/off switch, and preferably, a fuse.

*Some very old cars used 6V systems, and some military/industrial vehicles use 24V systems, these are rare though.
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