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Help me to fill in the blanks of a sentence.I am outwitted.





snowynight
The teacher asks us to fulfill the following sentence" he is good at ____and_____". You can only form the two missing words using letters "a b e f l o k t s".
This is from an exercise of a primary school. And I have tried hard and have to admit that it is above me.... Wink
Give me your help, thx.. Smile
goutha
you can use Scrabble Solver http://www.scrabblesolver.net/ to fill your blanks Smile
Bikerman
snowynight wrote:
The teacher asks us to fulfill the following sentence" he is good at ____and_____". You can only form the two missing words using letters "a b e f l o k t s".
This is from an exercise of a primary school. And I have tried hard and have to admit that it is above me.... Wink
Give me your help, thx.. Smile

I suspect the point is to see if the children can form words from the letters, rather than to test their anagram skills (the only anagram that leaps out at me would be 'fat blokes').
So you can make a number of words but they have to be things one does...
I have to say that for a primary school exercise it is very difficult, unless more information or some clues are provided.
You could use talks and tales or feats and fakes, but that would be way too hard for the average 11 yr old.
Nameless
Okay, but do you only have one of each letter is the restriction just those letters in general? Do you have to use ALL the letters, or can you leave some behind?
ocalhoun
Nameless wrote:
Do you have to use ALL the letters, or can you leave some behind?

Given the wording of the question, it seems to me that you could use one twice, and leave some behind...
(It says use 'only' these letters, not 'all' these letters... and usually such problems will specify when you can only use a letter once.)
...Though, it might be that you are required to do such things, as otherwise, there would be too many possible solutions.

a b e f l o k t s
To make things easier, separate the consonants and vowels:
stklfb aeo

float(s)
beak(s)
stake(s)
fleet(s)
bale(s)
sole(s)
flake(s)
lobe(s)

... I suppose those are all things one might be said to be 'good at'... in certain contexts. There's quite a lot more, but I haven't thought of any that jump out as the correct ones given the context of the phrase.
standready
Very interesting. I cannot come up with words that would "he would be good at" or make sense for "good at".
deanhills
Are we solving the puzzle? How about:

he is good at bets and sales?
Bikerman
That would be ungrammatical.
You can be good at betting, but not at bets. (the same applies to sales).
polly-gone
There is no way this is an elementary school exercise. Or maybe its something extremely obvious, but we just can't see it because we read words, not individual letters.

That's why it's possible to rearrange the letters in a word and msot people are albe to raed it raeosnably wlel stlil.

-Nick Cool Cool Cool
snowynight
It is kind of you to give me your replies. All of you are very helpful, and some of them are interesting and useful.
deanhills
Bikerman wrote:
That would be ungrammatical.
You can be good at betting, but not at bets. (the same applies to sales).
I don't agree. Bets is the plural of the noun bet, viz. all bets are off? And sales is the plural of the noun sale. Two nouns.

Quote:
something that is bet on, as a competitor in a sporting event or a number in a lottery: That horse looks like a good bet.

Source: Dictionary.com
Bikerman
deanhills wrote:
Bikerman wrote:
That would be ungrammatical.
You can be good at betting, but not at bets. (the same applies to sales).
I don't agree. Bets is the plural of the noun bet, viz. all bets are off? And sales is the plural of the noun sale. Two nouns.

Quote:
something that is bet on, as a competitor in a sporting event or a number in a lottery: That horse looks like a good bet.

Source: Dictionary.com

You cannot be good at (noun). You can only be good at (gerund*).
Sentence structure:
Noun (subject) 'is good at' gerund (object)
The thing which you are good at must be an activity - something one does - a 'doing' word, which is another way of saying a verb.
* Gerund (verb acting as noun)
deanhills
Bikerman wrote:
deanhills wrote:
Bikerman wrote:
That would be ungrammatical.
You can be good at betting, but not at bets. (the same applies to sales).
I don't agree. Bets is the plural of the noun bet, viz. all bets are off? And sales is the plural of the noun sale. Two nouns.

Quote:
something that is bet on, as a competitor in a sporting event or a number in a lottery: That horse looks like a good bet.

Source: Dictionary.com

You cannot be good at (noun). You can only be good at (verb/gerund).
Sentence structure:
Noun (subject) 'is good at' gerund (object)
As you wish. And if you want to be perfectly right.
Bikerman
Well, since the question was about education then wanting to be right would seem to be prerequisite, unless you believe teachers should teach that which is wrong...
Greatking
i think none of the words i have been able to form fit the sentence, it will be wrong i should try to fit them eg: float, beaf, beat, seat, seal, left etc, so many words formed but none of them fit the sentence!
Bikerman
Greatking wrote:
i think none of the words i have been able to form fit the sentence, it will be wrong i should try to fit them eg: float, beaf, beat, seat, seal, left etc, so many words formed but none of them fit the sentence!

You are right - in fact none of the words I managed to construct fit either. The major problem is that there is no ING, therefore you cannot construct any gerunds (doING words). I don't think there are ANY words possible which would fit and be grammatically correct.
ocalhoun
Bikerman wrote:
Greatking wrote:
i think none of the words i have been able to form fit the sentence, it will be wrong i should try to fit them eg: float, beaf, beat, seat, seal, left etc, so many words formed but none of them fit the sentence!

You are right - in fact none of the words I managed to construct fit either. The major problem is that there is no ING, therefore you cannot construct any gerunds (doING words). I don't think there are ANY words possible which would fit and be grammatically correct.

... he is good at soccer and golf.

Obviously, the letters don't work, but you don't necessarily need any 'ING's...
Bikerman
Yes, I had thought of those examples (and others - 'Sports' works as do examples - squash, tennis etc, 'language' works as do examples - French, Spanish etc).
So the sentence works with any gerund and some nouns, where the noun is an activity or skill, but not with nouns that have a gerund equivalent...I think....I honestly can't work out a general rule which would be true in all cases - need a grammar expert methinks....
It just shows what a bugger of a language English is to learn Smile
Ghost Rider103
The only word I can think of that would work is Fable (the game).

Other than that I can't come up with another one. That's quite hard for a school assignment, for any grade. I remember doing these kinds of things way back in elementary school, other than that I don't think I did any excersises like this in higher grades. So if this is elementary level, that's impressive. Especially is a student is capable of finding both words.

Other than that, maybe your teacher is setting you up to fail. Razz
Bikerman
No, as a teacher I find it inconceivable that this could be a primary school exercise...
Nameless
Primary school children are the best children to be trolling. Razz
Ghost900
Without spending hours I really can't come up with a word outside of the ones mentioned on the posts which I guess are not correct grammar of which i know nothing about.

Somehow this seems like an odd or unlikely assignment. Maybe some schools are harder, I don't know. Smile
Bikerman
I think the bait-line was cut some time ago Smile
polly-gone
Bikerman wrote:
Yes, I had thought of those examples (and others - 'Sports' works as do examples - squash, tennis etc, 'language' works as do examples - French, Spanish etc).
So the sentence works with any gerund and some nouns, where the noun is an activity or skill, but not with nouns that have a gerund equivalent...I think....I honestly can't work out a general rule which would be true in all cases - need a grammar expert methinks....
It just shows what a bugger of a language English is to learn Smile


Kind of off-topic, but sports do have a gerund equivalent. "He is playing soccer."

And anyway, I cannot think of a single rule in the English language that doesn't have a ton of exceptions.

Just sayin'

-Nick Cool Rolling Eyes Cool
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