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Skydiving





Vrythramax
Just a simple question of who around here has ever jumped (willingly or otherwise) out of a perfectly good airplane?

If you have, would you do it a second time?
Bikerman
I want to but the only time I had the chance (sponsored parachute jump) the event fell through and I didn't get the chance. I would do it with a moments notice, anytime Smile
Helios
Heh Max the HALO man Smile
Probably wasn't a perfectly good aircraft at that time... Rolling Eyes

Haven't done it yet, but hopefully I will in the near future. I'm planning to anyway. A collegue of mine did it three months ago, says it's awesome.
deanhills
I would, if ever an opportunity presents itself, but so far that has not happened yet. Looks like hard work though for a hobby, i.e. more than once. Hang gliding would also be something I would like to do. Must say however diving is giving me so much pleasure and it is so effortless and low cost, I would probably have to get out of that comfort zone first before I go for the sky diving and parachuting stuff, but yes, if they should cross my path spontaneously, I won't hesitate.

Max, I'm curious, why the question? Have you done parachuting once and wondering about a second time?
Vrythramax
deanhills wrote:
... Max, I'm curious, why the question? Have you done parachuting once and wondering about a second time?


I was visited by an old Army buddy and we got to talking about Jump School (we were both attached to an Airborn division), and we both agreed that the first jump was easy...the second one was much more difficult.

Yes dean I have jumped *many* times, and as Helios pointed out I have quite a few HALO jumps to my credit as well.

I am simply curious as to who at Frihost may have jumped for either sport or duty.
Nick2008
I have ALWAYS wanted to try skydiving. I'm hoping to try it out within the next 5 years as I love getting high in the air and seeing everything below. Money's been tight so I'm really cutting back on unnecessary activities, but if the economy rebounds soon, I'm hoping to find myself in the air. Very Happy
standready
All right, Max, I just have to ask. What is the highest attitude you jumped from? How about as a civilian?
deanhills
Vrythramax wrote:
deanhills wrote:
... Max, I'm curious, why the question? Have you done parachuting once and wondering about a second time?


I was visited by an old Army buddy and we got to talking about Jump School (we were both attached to an Airborn division), and we both agreed that the first jump was easy...the second one was much more difficult.

Yes dean I have jumped *many* times, and as Helios pointed out I have quite a few HALO jumps to my credit as well.

I am simply curious as to who at Frihost may have jumped for either sport or duty.
Thanks for the info Max. I never realized you were in the Army before.
Vrythramax
standready wrote:
All right, Max, I just have to ask. What is the highest attitude you jumped from? How about as a civilian?


Highest static line jump in the service 12,000ft or slightly more than 2.2 miles

Highest HALO jump with a freefall (we had to walk out of the ass end of a C-130 cargo plane) was a little more than 32,000 feet...or slightly more than 6.8 miles.

I have never jumped as a civilian
Blaster
I have never gotten to skydive although I want to jump at least once in my life. It looks like it would be a big rush of adrenaline and when I see it on tv it just looks like fun. The landing always looks a bit rough though.
Nameless
Vrythramax wrote:
(...) out of a perfectly good airplane?


I jumped out of an imperfect, childish imagination of an airplane, if that counts at all.
missdixy
Vrythramax wrote:
deanhills wrote:
... Max, I'm curious, why the question? Have you done parachuting once and wondering about a second time?


I was visited by an old Army buddy and we got to talking about Jump School (we were both attached to an Airborn division), and we both agreed that the first jump was easy...the second one was much more difficult.

Yes dean I have jumped *many* times, and as Helios pointed out I have quite a few HALO jumps to my credit as well.

I am simply curious as to who at Frihost may have jumped for either sport or duty.


oh gosh max! i never new this about you!! i really don't think i have it in me to jump out of an airplane. nope. definitely not. i am waaay too terrified of heights.
Vrythramax
missdixy wrote:
oh gosh max! i never new this about you!! i really don't think i have it in me to jump out of an airplane. nope. definitely not. i am waaay too terrified of heights.


Not to stray too far off topic, but I come from a military family, my father did tours of duty in 2 branches of the service (during WW2 he was a Marine, and during Korea he was in the Air force), my eldest brother is still in the Army and has been for 34 years, my next older brother was simply put...insane. He served during Vietnam and was highly decorated. I served a bit later and tried to emulate my older brother. I stayed with the military for 14 years.

If you are in the plane and the jumpmaster wants you too jump...you don't have a choice, you either jump or get thrown out of the plane!

At 30,000 it's no longer a fear of heights, it comes to a fear of falling.
driftingfe3s
I would love to try skydiving at least once. I have had a few friends who have done it and tell me it is such a rush. Skydiving is definitely one of those things on my bucket list.
deanhills
Vrythramax wrote:
missdixy wrote:
oh gosh max! i never new this about you!! i really don't think i have it in me to jump out of an airplane. nope. definitely not. i am waaay too terrified of heights.


Not to stray too far off topic, but I come from a military family, my father did tours of duty in 2 branches of the service (during WW2 he was a Marine, and during Korea he was in the Air force), my eldest brother is still in the Army and has been for 34 years, my next older brother was simply put...insane. He served during Vietnam and was highly decorated. I served a bit later and tried to emulate my older brother. I stayed with the military for 14 years.

If you are in the plane and the jumpmaster wants you too jump...you don't have a choice, you either jump or get thrown out of the plane!

At 30,000 it's no longer a fear of heights, it comes to a fear of falling.
I find this enormously interesting Max, so am grateful of your posting. I know this is digressing a little, but if I may ask, now that you are outside the army, how do you feel about the army from the outside in?
Vrythramax
deanhills wrote:
I find this enormously interesting Max, so am grateful of your posting. I know this is digressing a little, but if I may ask, now that you are outside the army, how do you feel about the army from the outside in?


I have been out of the service for quite sometime now, but having lived that way of life (even before even joining...my whole family was involved to a degree), I could never turn my back on the armed forces.

This topic isn't about me, so let's get back on topic.


Keep in mind people that a fear of heights may slow you down when your doing your first jump, but once you see what's outside you can't really focus on any one thing that would make you aware of how high you really are. Buildings are just little dots, and you can't see people or places.

Maybe I should ask another question, most people have had dreams of falling, and also most people wake from that dream and call it a nightmare. Would you willing accept that kind of feeling as a part of your daily routine??
timothymartin
Jumping out of a perfectly good plane sounds a lot better than having to jump out of a not so good plane. I would rather have the choice to do it on purpose than being forced.. SURPRISE!
missdixy
Vrythramax wrote:
missdixy wrote:
oh gosh max! i never new this about you!! i really don't think i have it in me to jump out of an airplane. nope. definitely not. i am waaay too terrified of heights.


Not to stray too far off topic, but I come from a military family, my father did tours of duty in 2 branches of the service (during WW2 he was a Marine, and during Korea he was in the Air force), my eldest brother is still in the Army and has been for 34 years, my next older brother was simply put...insane. He served during Vietnam and was highly decorated. I served a bit later and tried to emulate my older brother. I stayed with the military for 14 years.

If you are in the plane and the jumpmaster wants you too jump...you don't have a choice, you either jump or get thrown out of the plane!

At 30,000 it's no longer a fear of heights, it comes to a fear of falling.


You've got a point. But nonetheless I still think I'd have a hugeee fear of falling! I mean, my fear of heights stems from my fear of falling. The reason I get so afraid when I am high up is that I am afraid I may fallso...yea. If I tried to jump from a plane I would probably have a panic attack haha.

That's pretty cool that you have fallen 30,000 feet though! Well, impressive. I guess there is no military future for me if there is even a slight chance I'd end up having to jump from an airplane...heh Very Happy
standready
Max, 32,000 feet is a bit much for me. I would need more oxygen. I don't think I could walk out of a C131. I would have to run being chased by the JumpMaster. LOL

A bit off topic: Max, thanks to you and your family for your service.
missdixy
standready wrote:
A bit off topic: Max, thanks to you and your family for your service.


Seconded =]
Vrythramax
missdixy wrote:
... You've got a point. But nonetheless I still think I'd have a hugeee fear of falling! I mean, my fear of heights stems from my fear of falling. The reason I get so afraid when I am high up is that I am afraid I may fallso...yea. If I tried to jump from a plane I would probably have a panic attack haha.

That's pretty cool that you have fallen 30,000 feet though! Well, impressive. I guess there is no military future for me if there is even a slight chance I'd end up having to jump from an airplane...heh Very Happy


Well I wouldn't count out the chance of serving if you have (had) the chance...a future in the military at this time could be a bit dubious what with all that's going on, but it IS an honorable profession that offers an enormous amount of career options....all of which are voluntary. The services are very good at finding your strong points and ..er..guiding you towards them. Wink

Panic attacks are quite common, but it seems to walk hand-inhand with the rush you have going on (it's very hard to describe).

standready wrote:
Max, 32,000 feet is a bit much for me. I would need more oxygen. I don't think I could walk out of a C131. I would have to run being chased by the JumpMaster. LOL

A bit off topic: Max, thanks to you and your family for your service.


32,000 feet was a bit much for me also LOL, and trust me if you get to that point of your jumping career, there is no Jumpmaster anymore, it's just you and your buddies that urge you along, you look out for each other, 5 would willingly die to save one in trouble...and that is an AWESOME incentive!

Thank You for your gratitude to my family, in my home neighborhood we are treated very well Smile

Too further this offtopic conversation just a bit....my older brother was a Jumpmaster, he has over 1000 jumps during his military career and continues to jump as a civilian...but NOW I can say *NO* to him Smile

For the record, we wear oxygen masks during a HALO jump, the air is far too thin to breath at that altitude.

For those reading at home, HALO means "High Altitude Low Opening", you may jump at 30,000(+), but you dont open your chute till 1,500 feet (or less) to avoid RADAR.
Blaster
Hmm... Whats the difference of falling from 33,000 feet and standard jumping besides needing O2? To me its all high and if shit hits the fan your done so I don't think I would have a problem going that high after a bit of time.

Going a bit off topic but staying with the same topic I have a fear of heights a bit. However I enjoy rock climbing and repelling. I guess the whole fear of heights thing comes down to just getting used to it and trusting your equipment.

The trusting your equipment is something I was taught with fire fighting and I bet Max could say that they teach the same in the military.

So I don't think people have a fear of falling as much as there equipment not functioning properly. Don't get me wrong I'm sure some people still have the fear of jumping.
Parkour_Jarrod
I've never done it, and never plan on doing it, unless the plane is about to explode i wouldn't jump... I find it too freaky, but then again i have a fear of falling...

The scariest part about sky-diving is, what if something stuffs up? you have no fail-safe... and i want to live my life and die from natural means... like a nuclear warhead... T.T
Vrythramax
Parkour_Jarrod wrote:
I've never done it, and never plan on doing it, unless the plane is about to explode i wouldn't jump... I find it too freaky, but then again i have a fear of falling...

The scariest part about sky-diving is, what if something stuffs up? you have no fail-safe... and i want to live my life and die from natural means... like a nuclear warhead... T.T


Yeah I can appreciate that feeling...there are very few reasons to jumps out of a perfectly good aircraft...but those reasons do exist.

From experience I can tell you that is a standard that the person behind you checks your chute...and even if you go "streamer" (your main chute doesn't open...we also call it a "Roman Candle"), you always have your secondary, or backup chute.
standready
Vrythramax wrote:

From experience I can tell you that is a standard that the person behind you checks your chute...and even if you go "streamer" (your main chute doesn't open...we also call it a "Roman Candle"), you always have your secondary, or backup chute.

HALO, If the main chute does not deploy at 1500 feet, are you really going to have enough time to realize and deploy that back up? I mean you travel 1500 feet in free fall in how many seconds?
I think I will stick with the ejector seat for exiting the plane and only if I absolutely need too. That is truly in kick in the...mmmm..pants.
deanhills
I have to agree with Blaster. Trust of equipment and in the operators who are managing the jumps would be a crucial issue, like in diving as well. Your tanks have to be in good shape, all your equipment in good working order, and you should be knowledgeable of what you are doing as well as love doing it.
watersoul
I did the days training for a static-line jump a few years ago. Was really excited for the jump scheduled for the next day but the weather was rough rain wind and it was postponed.
Unfortunately the weather stayed like that every weekend for the following 2 months so I lost interest and never went back.
One day though, I will definitely do it again as it's another tick-box in my life that needs completing.
Vrythramax
standready wrote:
ALO, If the main chute does not deploy at 1500 feet, are you really going to have enough time to realize and deploy that back up? I mean you travel 1500 feet in free fall in how many seconds?
I think I will stick with the ejector seat for exiting the plane and only if I absolutely need too. That is truly in kick in the...mmmm..pants.


OK, Good question...I know many pilots who have had to "bail out" via the ejection seat, and they are ALL in agreeance that they never want to do it again. The ejector seat has a substantial charge of trinitrotoluene (TNT) under it that explodes to propel you through the canopy and a certain amount of feet from the aircraft.

I can only speak from experience and from the observation of others, you are (when in the jump) extremely aware of the limitations of your hardware...you have your hand on the secondary (or backup) chute *before* you pull your main drag, if for an instant you don't feel the tug of it...you pop your backup....otherwise you are roadkill.

Such is the life of a paratrooper.
Blaster
I have talked to people that have also been ejected like that. It is such a strain on your body and you still have to come to the ground.

I would rather willingly jump than be forced to. If i was forced to there would be so much more going through my head and who knows the last time the chute was packed and such like that.
deanhills
Looked quite effortless when Bruce Willis did it in one of his Die Hard movies. The Airport Die Hard movie, think it was the Number 2 one. Can those seats really eject that high? Smile
Vrythramax
deanhills wrote:
Looked quite effortless when Bruce Willis did it in one of his Die Hard movies. The Airport Die Hard movie, think it was the Number 2 one. Can those seats really eject that high? Smile


They really pack a punch. The seat really throws you like 30-50 feet from the plane and when you factor in the speed you are traveling at and the sudden change of direction and momentum...it's got be a very unnerving experience.

Imagine getting blown out of a car that's doing 400mph and then falling off a cliff...*ouch*
Blaster
Hmmm seems like a bit of fact vs fiction

Die hard is a movie. It has to look effortless in order for it to make sense.

Most movies don't portray fact and fiction very well. You have to look at actual videos of it for you to get a real sense of what it feels like.



watersoul
Blaster wrote:
Hmmm seems like a bit of fact vs fiction

Die hard is a movie. It has to look effortless in order for it to make sense.

Most movies don't portray fact and fiction very well. You have to look at actual videos of it for you to get a real sense of what it feels like.


Totally agree there, I've never done it myself but have heard stories of the stresses of an eject while mid-flight, I wouldn't fancy doing it. I can only imagine the G-force going on as the chair leaves the plane Shocked

Off topic slightly, but speaking of the lies in films, I'm really glad that British car crashes don't seem to end up in an explosion almost every time - never happened to me in some quite serious crashes, just a slow fire.

...although I guess the UK film industry would probably show them as well if they had the funding Laughing
missdixy
Vrythramax wrote:
deanhills wrote:
Looked quite effortless when Bruce Willis did it in one of his Die Hard movies. The Airport Die Hard movie, think it was the Number 2 one. Can those seats really eject that high? Smile


They really pack a punch. The seat really throws you like 30-50 feet from the plane and when you factor in the speed you are traveling at and the sudden change of direction and momentum...it's got be a very unnerving experience.

Imagine getting blown out of a car that's doing 400mph and then falling off a cliff...*ouch*


Perhaps i am missing something. Is this seat-ejection thing on aircraft common? Is it done in training, or for fun (the way skydiving is) or only in like emergency situations where jumping out isn't possible for some reason (perhaps time-sensitive emergencies)? I can't imagine anyone wanting to do this for fun. Is this something only pilots do (and thus they initiate the ejection) or is it sometimes sort of done automatically by the airplane or by the pilot (as in, he pushes a button and he and any passengers get ejected)? I can't imagine what it would feel like to have to jump out of an airplane, even worse, being suddenly ejected out without warning!
watersoul
missdixy wrote:
Vrythramax wrote:
deanhills wrote:
Looked quite effortless when Bruce Willis did it in one of his Die Hard movies. The Airport Die Hard movie, think it was the Number 2 one. Can those seats really eject that high? Smile


They really pack a punch. The seat really throws you like 30-50 feet from the plane and when you factor in the speed you are traveling at and the sudden change of direction and momentum...it's got be a very unnerving experience.

Imagine getting blown out of a car that's doing 400mph and then falling off a cliff...*ouch*


Perhaps i am missing something. Is this seat-ejection thing on aircraft common? Is it done in training, or for fun (the way skydiving is) or only in like emergency situations where jumping out isn't possible for some reason (perhaps time-sensitive emergencies)? I can't imagine anyone wanting to do this for fun. Is this something only pilots do (and thus they initiate the ejection) or is it sometimes sort of done automatically by the airplane or by the pilot (as in, he pushes a button and he and any passengers get ejected)? I can't imagine what it would feel like to have to jump out of an airplane, even worse, being suddenly ejected out without warning!


It's an option for mostly military pilots when everything is in a mess and death in a horrible crash is the only other perceived choice available!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ejection_seat
standready
missdixy wrote:
Perhaps i am missing something. Is this seat-ejection thing on aircraft common?

Not on commercial aircraft but yes on military aircraft.

missdixy wrote:
Is it done in training, or for fun

Military has a simulators to use for training purposes. They use the same charge as in the real seat and send you up a rail. It is not fun but necessary to teach you proper position to get you out of the aircraft.

Some amusement parks have rides similar to them except much less kick.
ProfessorY91
Okay. I've never had the good or bad fortune to experience getting ejected from an airplane before. Although I would like to experience an ejection seat - I figure that its a safety feature designed for someone who knows what they're doing in a cockpit. In a pinch I can fly an airplane, but I lay no claim to have the experience of flying something that has an ejection seat installed. Hats off to y'all.

I am a civillian, and I have gone skydiving, however. Its a brilliant experience. On my first jump, however, my main chute did fail to deploy (and there was a horrible moment of panic) before I remembered the instructions for deploying the backup chute. That worked fine, but it was a pretty tense moment. I'm probably never going to forget that.
Bikerman
I really don't think you would want to experience an ejection seat.
As Max has said the forces are horrendous. You would typically pull about 14g during ejection - enough to ensure that ejectees have compression fractures of the vertebrae in about half of those who use them.
http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ac/equip/eject.htm
Blaster
ProfessorY91 wrote:
Okay. I've never had the good or bad fortune to experience getting ejected from an airplane before. Although I would like to experience an ejection seat - I figure that its a safety feature designed for someone who knows what they're doing in a cockpit. In a pinch I can fly an airplane, but I lay no claim to have the experience of flying something that has an ejection seat installed. Hats off to y'all.

I am a civillian, and I have gone skydiving, however. Its a brilliant experience. On my first jump, however, my main chute did fail to deploy (and there was a horrible moment of panic) before I remembered the instructions for deploying the backup chute. That worked fine, but it was a pretty tense moment. I'm probably never going to forget that.


After an experience like that have/would you go out on another jump?

I feel that something like that you can look at 2 ways. Either a) get back out there and face your fears or b) take that as a sign and don't do it again.
deanhills
Looks as though "eject" is a really absolute last resort, but never realized what a high-risk resort that is. Would probably have been nice if they had those during World War II? Or did they have it and I've got it wrong here? So many of the pilots got burnt really badly because there was no "exit" from their cockpits?
Bikerman
With WW2 technology it would not have been possible.
Even in the 1960s the Soviet ejector units had a fatality rate of around 30% and an serious injury rate of close to 100%. They were pulling a sustained 22g....

There again WW2 planes were only doing 200-300mph routinely, so parachutes would have sufficed for most exits....
chatrack
I like to see skydiving, but dont try it in any way
deanhills
Bikerman wrote:
With WW2 technology it would not have been possible.
Even in the 1960s the Soviet ejector units had a fatality rate of around 30% and an serious injury rate of close to 100%. They were pulling a sustained 22g....

There again WW2 planes were only doing 200-300mph routinely, so parachutes would have sufficed for most exits....
Not for those who would not have been able to get out however because of fire or injury. Fire in a trapped situation being one of the most horrendous injuries in those planes.
ankitdatashn
Vrythramax wrote:
standready wrote:
All right, Max, I just have to ask. What is the highest attitude you jumped from? How about as a civilian?


Highest static line jump in the service 12,000ft or slightly more than 2.2 miles

Highest HALO jump with a freefall (we had to walk out of the ass end of a C-130 cargo plane) was a little more than 32,000 feet...or slightly more than 6.8 miles.

I have never jumped as a civilian


Hi Max, I saw on wikipedia that ceiling altitude of C-130 is 23000 feet so I am amazed you did a fall from 32000 feet Razz , umm, I guess it might not be fully loaded hence might have got that extra altitude.

I am a hardcore aircraft enthusiast, I have never done a fall but would love it anytime in my life in future, lets see when I get a chance, here in India you dont have many options for a skyjump Sad
Blaster
deanhills wrote:
Bikerman wrote:
With WW2 technology it would not have been possible.
Even in the 1960s the Soviet ejector units had a fatality rate of around 30% and an serious injury rate of close to 100%. They were pulling a sustained 22g....

There again WW2 planes were only doing 200-300mph routinely, so parachutes would have sufficed for most exits....
Not for those who would not have been able to get out however because of fire or injury. Fire in a trapped situation being one of the most horrendous injuries in those planes.


Yea I agree I would rather be hurt then dead...

Quote:
A bungee-assisted escape from an aircraft took place in 1910. In 1916 Everard Calthrop, an early inventor of parachutes, patented an ejector seat using compressed air.[1]

The modern layout for an ejection seat was first proposed by Romanian inventor Anastase Dragomir in the late 1920s. The design, featuring a parachuted cell (a dischargeable chair from an aircraft or other vehicle), was successfully tested on August 25, 1929 at the Paris-Orly Airport near Paris and in October 1929 at Băneasa, near Bucharest. Dragomir patented his "catapult-able cockpit" at the French Patent Office (patent no. 678566, of April 2, 1930, Nouveau système de montage des parachutes dans les appareils de locomotion aérienne).

The design was perfected during World War II. Prior to this, the only means of escape from an incapacitated aircraft was to jump clear ("bail-out"), and in many cases this was difficult due to injury, the difficulty of egress from a confined space, g forces, the airflow past the aircraft, and other factors.

The first ejection seats were developed independently during World War II by Heinkel and SAAB. Early models were powered by compressed air and the first aircraft to be fitted with such a system was the Heinkel He 280 prototype jet fighter in 1940. One of the He 280 test pilots, Helmut Schenk, became the first person to escape from a stricken aircraft with an ejection seat on 13 January 1942 after his control surfaces iced up and became inoperable. The fighter, being used in tests of the Argus As 014 impulse jets for Fieseler Fi 103 missile development, had its regular HeS 8A turbojets removed, and was towed aloft from Rechlin, Germany by a pair of Bf 110C tugs in a heavy snow-shower. At 7,875 feet (2,400 m), Schenk found he had no control, jettisoned his towline, and ejected.[2] The He 280, however, never reached production status. Thus, the first operational type to provide ejection seats for the crew was the Heinkel He 219 Uhu night fighter in 1942.

In Sweden a version using compressed air was tested in 1941. A gunpowder ejection seat was developed by Bofors and tested in 1943 for the Saab 21. The first test in the air was on a Saab 17 on 27 February 1944,[3] and the first real use occurred by Lt. Bengt Johansson (who later changes it to Järkenstedt) on 29 July 1946 after a mid-air collision between a J 21 and a J 22.[4]

In late 1944, the Heinkel He 162 featured a new type of ejection seat, this time fired by an explosive cartridge. In this system the seat rode on wheels set between two pipes running up the back of the cockpit. When lowered into position, caps at the top of the seat fitted over the pipes to close them. Cartridges, basically identical to shotgun shells, were placed in the bottom of the pipes, facing upward. When fired, the gases would fill the pipes, "popping" the caps off the end, and thereby forcing the seat to ride up the pipes on its wheels and out of the aircraft. By the end of the war, the Do-335 Pfeil and a few prototype aircraft were also fitted with ejection seats...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ejection_seat
Bikerman
deanhills wrote:
Bikerman wrote:
With WW2 technology it would not have been possible.
Even in the 1960s the Soviet ejector units had a fatality rate of around 30% and an serious injury rate of close to 100%. They were pulling a sustained 22g....

There again WW2 planes were only doing 200-300mph routinely, so parachutes would have sufficed for most exits....
Not for those who would not have been able to get out however because of fire or injury. Fire in a trapped situation being one of the most horrendous injuries in those planes.

An ejector seat would have been little use. The rocket technology of the time was very primitive and it would have been more likely to cause fire than allow escape from it...
ankitdatashn
Vrythramax wrote:

They really pack a punch. The seat really throws you like 30-50 feet from the plane and when you factor in the speed you are traveling at and the sudden change of direction and momentum...it's got be a very unnerving experience.

Imagine getting blown out of a car that's doing 400mph and then falling off a cliff...*ouch*


Yeah it is, The G's are only for experts!, can't be taken up by rookie's... I would like to state an example that would explain how much force these ejection seats can exert. There is a place here where these ejection seats are fitted into the aircrafts. Once it was lying idle to be fitted soon into the combat aircraft. Now a person was casually checking out the various places in that firm, he inadvertently sat on that seat and pressed the ejection button only to be thrashed on the roof and be killed in milliseconds!! Now thats the amount of potential energy stored in those seats!! :O
deanhills
Bikerman wrote:
deanhills wrote:
Bikerman wrote:
With WW2 technology it would not have been possible.
Even in the 1960s the Soviet ejector units had a fatality rate of around 30% and an serious injury rate of close to 100%. They were pulling a sustained 22g....

There again WW2 planes were only doing 200-300mph routinely, so parachutes would have sufficed for most exits....
Not for those who would not have been able to get out however because of fire or injury. Fire in a trapped situation being one of the most horrendous injuries in those planes.

An ejector seat would have been little use. The rocket technology of the time was very primitive and it would have been more likely to cause fire than allow escape from it...
That does sound logical doesn't it? I'm certain that the engineers of that time must have considered it too, but the technology was not ready for it yet. As you say, it could probably have created more damage than any good.
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A blonde and a brunette are skydiving.
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