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Snow Field in August





Afaceinthematrix
I guess it doesn't matter what time of the year it is (August in North America... Probably the hottest part of the summer)... You're bound to see snow if you're high enough in the mountains... These are pictures from my recent week-long mini-excursion from last week.




I didn't expect to deal with much snow when I went on this trip. But it came and so I dealt with it. This is the full picture of what we were trying to do. We had camped the previous night from behind where this picture was taken and we were traveling over the pass in the center and then we headed a few miles down to another lake around another mountain. As you can see, we couldn't go below the snow as there was a cliff, and going above the snow would have been extra effort...



Overall, it was a decent trip since I enjoy hiking/camping. There were only a few set backs - like a few bugs that decided that I was a nice place to nest... And the millions of mosquitos that decided top bite me... But those are the usual discomforts...

I thought that some people might be interested in knowing that California isn't all what most people vision it as - hot and dry... If you go to the high sierras (this was about 50 miles north of Mt. Whitney - the highest mountain int the continental U.S), you can get quite different environments and world class hiking...
deanhills
Those are really nice photos. I have heard about the Sierras in California from my cousin, who favour those parts of California. He has not hiked or camped like you have however, nor got as close to the top. I was totally unaware about the snow as well. Thanks for posting them.
Afaceinthematrix
He's not gotten close to the top? I've gotten to the top! The Sierras are home to Mt. Whitney - the highest mountain the continental U.S. I have climbed Mt. Whitney. Although climbing that mountain isn't too much of an accomplishment because it is actually quite easy (no technical climbing ability needed). There is a trail up to the top and so anyone who is reasonably fit (and I was 15 - and an athlete - when I did it). These particular mountains that I photographed here had no trails. It required a little more effort and climbing to get up. I did plenty of dangerous maneuvers to get up there. I did some vertical climbing. What I did was part of the "Sierra High Route."

I encourage everyone to visit the Sierras... They're worth a visit. Even if you're not going into the vast backcountry and you're choosing to just visit the 5% or so accessible by car. It's still worth it... In the 5% or so accessible by car you can see Yosemite Valley in Yosemite National Forest, Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park, and many other nice places...

Although, if you're up to an adventure, the Sierras aren't a bad place to "backpack" through with just a backpack with your tent and a little food... And if you're interested, I'd be a good person to get advice from (I think this was trip 9 into the Sierras and each ranged from one to two weeks).
ocalhoun
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
He's not gotten close to the top? I've gotten to the top! The Sierras are home to Mt. Wh
I encourage everyone to visit the Sierras... They're worth a visit.

Been there. ^.^ Only the lower slopes though, no serious mountaineering.

My next big destination will be Alaska, though I think.

I'd like to try out some of the areas where bears outnumber humans. ^.^
wellerchap
Fantastic sense of wilderness in those pictures...please tell me there was no McDonald's right behind you Very Happy

I love to get away into the hills in the UK, but you're never far from another person, so it's very difficult to get real solitude.
The thought of trekking in somewhere, camping, walking (thanks, but no REAL climbing for me...just scrambling!) is very appealing.
Afaceinthematrix
ocalhoun wrote:
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
He's not gotten close to the top? I've gotten to the top! The Sierras are home to Mt. Wh
I encourage everyone to visit the Sierras... They're worth a visit.

Been there. ^.^ Only the lower slopes though, no serious mountaineering.

My next big destination will be Alaska, though I think.

I'd like to try out some of the areas where bears outnumber humans. ^.^


I have been to areas like that. I think I have been to areas where black bears outnumber humans and places where grizzlies outnumber humans. Canada is a pretty nice place for that. I have been wanting to do Alaska for quite a few years but it just hasn't worked out yet. I will make it work out hopefully within the next few years. However, right now, Costa Rica is on my list for the next place that I go (well the next "outdoor" place that I go at least. I think, for money issues, it will be after my trip to Germany next summer).

wellerchap wrote:
Fantastic sense of wilderness in those pictures...please tell me there was no McDonald's right behind you :D

I love to get away into the hills in the UK, but you're never far from another person, so it's very difficult to get real solitude.
The thought of trekking in somewhere, camping, walking (thanks, but no REAL climbing for me...just scrambling!) is very appealing.


Haha. There was no McDonald's behind me. There was, essentially, the same scenery behind me as in front of me. In some places in the U.S., you can get relatively remote. I've actually (after several days of intense hiking), been to the most "remote" place in the Continental U.S. I think it was 38 miles (as the crow flies, about 50 or 60 miles by hiking) or something from the nearest road.

This place was only 2 days of hiking (out of a 7 day trip) in from the little road where I parked my car. So I was maybe 13 miles from the nearest road. And from that road, it was about a 40 minute drive to the nearest city.

And if you've thought about trekking in somewhere, just go for it! Go somewhere remote (probably not in the U.K., as you said), pack some food, tent, survival gear, and just hike as far as you can each day. Then set up camp. Sleep. And then the next day wake up and hike to a new destination!
ocalhoun
Afaceinthematrix wrote:

And if you've thought about trekking in somewhere, just go for it! Go somewhere remote (probably not in the U.K., as you said), pack some food, tent, survival gear, and just hike as far as you can each day. Then set up camp. Sleep. And then the next day wake up and hike to a new destination!


I am a fan of the freewheeling adventure type...
But a plan, and a map would be good.
If only to make sure you have enough supplies and to prevent stupid (and embarrassing) distress calls. -Don't be the guy who starts off on a three-day hike with only one bottle of water and an i-phone. (Unless you're an experienced survivalist looking for a challenge.)
owenbeckham
I live in Hong Kong, and really want to have an experience of snow
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