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As we are all using computers why can't we work from home





chasbeen
With more and more advances in computing why are we all still commuting from home and wasting time travelling to and from work?
We can use web conferencing software for meetings so we don't need to travel miles for meetings?
Do you think that certain companies will start to like the idea of us working from home?
After alln they would reduce their costs.

Reduced office rental costs
Possibly reduced wages bills (Retrain the managers move on!)

This would reduce the strain on the roads, free up infrastructure and reduce pollution?

Has your job seen changes because of this?
Do you think your job / company could benefit from this?
Peterssidan
Often it's much easier to communicate through speech. It is also harder for the boss to know if people are spending the time on work they should, and for many people it's easier to concentrate when they get away from home. Of course it can work for some people and some companies but I don't think everyone will work from home in the future.
chasbeen
So (Thanks for your reply by the way)
what they should (Could!) do is redefine the way work is delvered.
You see they could see what work you have produced,
This leads on to a new subject also.
Most work should be contracted out.
A lot of jobs cannot be done from home but getting back to a new Blog subject
"Most work should be contracted out"
The humble delivery man could be contracted out, so he would have a computer terminal at home and recieve messages to deliver something. (He would have had to buy his own truck and have a licence to set himself up)

Motto: Do the job and get well paid but when the jobs done MOVE ON!
jilbs
I agree. people will still be working in offices. even with the advancement of technology, there are still things to be considered while working such as working environment and others. People are more productive in offices than of working at home.
chasbeen
Yes at the moment people are more productive when working in offices.
However remember new Dynamics would be setup so that it would work.

For example. A company changes from 80% permanent staff to 20% permanent staff, with 80% of the staff temporary staff that must deliver end products before they are paid.

These would be "contracted staff"

The companies in the new scheme would be monitored through the use of government legislation so that companies did not rip independent contractors off.

It's just an example of setting up new Dynamics.
jilbs
You're theory is good but I guess it will only benefit the company and not the employees. "contractual staff" will not get job security because they can be removed anytime. If this happens, there are very less people who will get permanent jobs with benefits.

Implementing this will do no good to people in general. Yes they have jobs but no security.

I guess lawmakers will not allow this to happen.

Your dynamics is feasible. Smile
chasbeen
people in general

The objective would be to make the Contractor people in general

They are paid much more highly but it's up to them to arrange their own benefits.

The existing current legal infrastructure in most countries supports a 20% Contractor configuration.

Enticements and guaranteed work will push this figure higher and higher.

You see it's already happening but it means the removal and/or retraining of other staff whose only contribution is to manage people.
pachinko
I fully agree with Mrs Chasbeen. Something that I find completely amzing is when you go to a website that pretends offer "home jobs" most of these websites let fill formulas and get through a head break fillin all those forms and at the end they ask you to buy their products with the promiss of giving you back your money in case you are not satisfied. I think that they have to review their politics and respect the people who are looking for a job from their homes.
chasbeen
Yes, there are a few real "work from home" jobs but there are a lot of scammers ruining the concept.
As I keep saying, the infrastructure to make working from home productive and cost affective for both employers/employees and/or Clients/contractors is not there.

Are governments deliberately stopping this.

The campaign for real jobs will continue and become inevitable in the end.
Bluedoll
Really don’t think governments are concerned about out of the house jobs as long as it doesn’t interfere with local residential zoning. The bottom line is there are only so many jobs available and that little fact adjusts with the economy.

There will always be a lot of small business opportunities but are not governments and large corporations the biggest players in the business world?

The rest of the people outside these circles are left to search for another kind of niche market.

Yes perhaps only where there is a gap to be found which will allow the work at home entrepreneur to do something that is more cost effective does working out of a brief case by the door actually seem logical.

I also think it only sounds easy just to be able to clear off the table and do some work before and after dinner but in reality leaving the home might still be the only option for a lot of people if they really can’t see an economic advantage of being stationary.

Also, doing any kind of work at the house is really dependant on the persons work habits and the type of work they can actually do.
chasbeen
I have been making general statements this is true.

It would only be suitable for "certain" people.

However consider this also.
(1)An individual offering a service which he/she can deliver quicker than anyone inside a corporation.
(2)How many of these types of jobs exist?
(3)How much should you pay for this type of specialist if they are in heavy demand?
(4)Is it possible to train existing staff for these future unforeseen tasks.
(5)Is it cheaper to pay the specialist individual 5X as much (If market conditions demand it). After all if the task takes (on average 2 weeks a year) and the individuals that offer the service are very good at it.
(6)Does the government offer incentives to increase the number of these individuals?

The bottom line is that the group that constituted "certain" people would increase to an "optimum" if the correct incentives were in place.

Do you think the "correct incentives" are in place already?
chatrack
Working from home jobs can no have tight time schedule. We feel more comfort working from home, so natural the work will not go faster. There is lack of a Boss, who control the rate of work, that is a major drawback.
Bluedoll
I agree, anyone working from home has to be dedicated, independent and done only by those that have a solid work ethic.

1) it is possible but not all Corp’s work this way, in fact waste is not always a priority. Examples are job security and information security promote less efficient means.

2)Perhaps the question should be how many jobs can be invented?

3)Market value, it might also need to be a cheaper to be competitive. However, quality is important. Once a job has been identified, other workers abroad comes into play, affecting any pay scales.

4)I think so, another corporate decision I suppose.

5)Makes sense to me but cheaper isn’t always the only factor. Perhaps the history and the success rate achieved in doing outsourcing is a big consideration for the decision makers.

6)I am not sure incentives are the main consideration in a free market. If communication is effective and good options are made available it will just make plain sense to hire or fire based on value of the product or service?

You are talking about work right? Is it not the worker that is responsible for providing a product or service that stands on its own merit? I am not saying governments shouldn’t help people I am just wondering if in this case if it is necessary for incentives?

In my view (I can change it) whether you work at a company office or out of the office as an employee or as a contractor both job requirements have similarities as well as differences. In the end you still need to work your tail off to get what you want?
chasbeen
Quote:
Perhaps the question should be how many jobs can be invented?

I know of some sectors that are crying out for experts to satisfy an immediate need they need an expert and they want the job done quickly.

Supply and Demand is king.

However (and finally to get to the point) in some countries the legislation surrounding companies and their relationship with suppliers is confusing.

For example I was an IT consultant for several years before I moved to North America. Just before I left the my country (and consulting) the government declared software consultants "disguised employees".

Step 1-Increase the tax on these one man companies who are in fact "disguised employees"

Step 2-Back tax the consultant for all the years he/she has been consulting.

Now certain sectors in that country are complaining about a skill shortage, is it any wonder?

Excuse the generalisations but I feel I have been around the block and feel I have a handle on the situation.

Thanks for your interest though.
timothymartin
Most people do not have the ability to 'boss' themselves around. So there would be a lot less productivity if they 'worked' from home without supervision. Nothing would get done, and that would only increase. And then there is the issue of liability.
chasbeen
Quote:
Most people do not have the ability to 'boss' themselves around. So there would be a lot less productivity if they 'worked' from home without supervisio


Not if they were under contract terms to deliver something(for instance) the right legislation and controls have to be in place to protect clients and the lone consultant.
natilovesmike
There is a lot of people working from home. My husband tries to work from home at least once a week and sometimes more since he has an hour drive to his work otherwise.

I do sometimes work at home too, if I have a lot to write or read...
Bluedoll
Quote:
Increase the tax on these one man companies who are in fact "disguised employees"


Ok, I see the point. Yes I can understand when the revenue departments do not get their tax dollar they see a need to collect it and you are saying there should be a break from that department.

Something as simple as selling products on ebay could be considered 'a business income' and unless an individual volunteers to be taxed, they are not collected, therefore the need to undisguise. However they could give small business a break to help the economy and balance the tax flow that way.
chasbeen
Now your getting there..
decent_31bs
im also working at home.. im a home based web programmer... i like the way im working. i can always spend time to my family, have a rest if i needed to, as what you have said, to transportation cost.

but there's also disadvantages in working at home. We cant separate our work from our personal life. this is very true bcoz in this setup, our house is our office, thus we are on duty all the time. other that that, we dont have this so called officemate. we are living in a virtual social life. i think thats one of the disadvantages..

other that benefits of the company there are also pros and cons to the employers working at home. Smile
chasbeen
Oh I pictured you in an office decent_31bs,. Having said that you are in a "virtual office", your company is saving office space and you saving on travelling costs.
No wonder your a type of happy. Wink
airh3ad
My wife starting earning from article writing in our home she can divide her time to me and while im working into web designing my partime job, its too difficult for me now cause im now expert on web designing im newbee i have local project now. The disadvantages is we don't have time to visit our friends to chat or having party but its okey atlest we earn additional income.
standready
chatrack wrote:
Working from home jobs can no have tight time schedule. We feel more comfort working from home, so natural the work will not go faster. There is lack of a Boss, who control the rate of work, that is a major drawback.

I am a mechanical engineer. I always have deadlines. If I have not designed and released a part for manufacture the project schedule gets delayed. The big boss is unhappy. Communication if problems arise is important just like in the office.
I do work from home for several companies. I do not "clock in". I just have work with projected completion schedules. How I get it done is my responsibility. I sometimes work 20 hours straight to try to meet schedule.
The biggest obstacle to working from home is "self-motivation". So many people need "the boss" to make them do their jobs.
chasbeen
Quote:
I just have work with projected completion schedules

The motivation for working from home is not an issue as long as you are prepared to accept the responsibility of what "working from home" really means.

Both client and freelancer are a happy Very Happy
joostvane
Some things can be easily done from home, but I think it would be much easyer for communication that everyone is at the same place.

In my house there are also too many distractions :p
watersoul
I used to be solely "based from home", in the sense that when not visiting clients, my emails, phone calls, paperwork etc would all be done in my house. There were good elements to it such as freedom to carry out other things as and when I needed to, and a quirky benefit of being able to make my first phonecalls of the day still sat in bed with a coffee!
I found it was difficult to motivate myself though and would be distracted by anything, even if it was just my cat. I also craved the interaction with work colleagues - fellow people to bounce ideas off, or simply just to share complaints or funny stories about the organisation etc.

Eventually I struck a deal with my employer that I would start and finish my day at the office to complete the admin work related to my day's appointments. I'm still technically based from home in order to cover any necessary out of hours stuff, as needed, but I have a routine now which I prefer, and find much more fun than the lonely situation of only actually seeing people in a work day who needed or wanted something from me. I finish each day completely up to date with the ancilliary tasks associated with my role, and also have a few laughs with the folk in the office each day.

Different folks, different strokes I guess, but for me, the human interaction with fellow employees is a benefit of work on top of the salary. I didn't realise how important that was until I no longer had it.
chasbeen
And (Perhaps) you don't realise and/or cannot take advantage of the very commonly available interactive software you can have on your computer.

Skype is one such interaction tool and the professional version encourages a virtual office. Free version is just between 2 people.

I understand the need to interact with people.

It's interesting you mentioning "distractions". This is where you have to train yourself.

Tell yourself "I'm not going to check the sports results or play with my cat until I have at least achieved such and such"
watersoul
chasbeen wrote:
And (Perhaps) you don't realise and/or cannot take advantage of the very commonly available interactive software you can have on your computer.

Skype is one such interaction tool and the professional version encourages a virtual office. Free version is just between 2 people.

I understand the need to interact with people.

It's interesting you mentioning "distractions". This is where you have to train yourself.

Tell yourself "I'm not going to check the sports results or play with my cat until I have at least achieved such and such"


Yep, all of the above are available and in use in our organisation, with webcam's playing an integral role fitted on the top of all laptop screens. Call me old fashioned, or whatever, but it just isn't the same for me. The nuances of face to face human interaction can never be replaced completely with current tech that really goes as far as moving images with sound.
The relationship building in simple things like making a cup of tea for a colleague and sharing a chat for a moment is something I enjoy, and will continue to as long as I can. I totally understand and see a place for tech-intensive home working, but there will always be a human element missing in it for me.
Even today when one of the girls in the office had some home made soup and my reaction was "ooh whats that, it smells lovely!" sparking an interesting conversation...all those human things that rely on senses not yet capable of being replaced by IT, I missed while being home-based.
It's deeper at a human level for me and until Skype can cover all my senses, it will remain an inferior alternative to communication in person.

As far as training to be motivated and not distracted by stuff, you're absolutely right, if I had to do it I would...I just don't "have" to yet, but remain ready to face it when and/or if the future puts me in that position Wink
chasbeen
I love that beech picture.

Maybe we should be socializing with people external to work whilst maintaining a good professional relationship with the colleagues at work.
You might be able to work at relatively fast speeds with your skill and work only 4 hours a day 5 hours a week.

This for me would balance the people we should be friends with.

I'm not pretending to not have be brain washed but I'm thinking of a more Utopian solution where everyone uses their time more effectively with more rewarding returns....
watersoul
chasbeen wrote:
I love that beech picture.

Cheers fella, 200 (ish) metres from my house Smile

chasbeen wrote:
Maybe we should be socializing with people external to work whilst maintaining a good professional relationship with the colleagues at work.
You might be able to work at relatively fast speeds with your skill and work only 4 hours a day 5 hours a week.

This for me would balance the people we should be friends with.

I'm not pretending to not have be brain washed but I'm thinking of a more Utopian solution where everyone uses their time more effectively with more rewarding returns....


I actually negotiated a reduction of my hours to 6 per day (Monday - Friday) two months ago. I have lost quite a few thousand pounds over the year as a result, but now in my 2nd month of the reduced wage I'm still pretty comfortable and its the best move I've made in a long time. The deal was essentially swung by using the office for more appointments, thereby reducing my travelling expenses and travelling time, and actually seeing more people in less hours. (the office being a fixed cost that my being there or not doesn't change)

I absolutely love the free time I have as a result, I can now paddle in my kayak everyday after work even in the short daylight hours of Winter, and save the evening for my "real" friends.
Going back to work colleagues though, I do value them for the parts they play in the element of my life that solely involves funding the things I want/need.
My work "friends" are the people who can empathise about the boring work issues that should stay in work. With strong and more personal (and human) work relationships, I save my "out of work" friends the tedious stories of what happened that day, and concentrate on the personal issues that are inside me - not the ones involved with how I fund my "real" life.

...check my latest blog post if you're bored though: Compulsory meeting at head office tomorrow..Ooh! perhaps I might think differently at close of business Wednesday! Lol
chasbeen
Dpn't change a thing!
(Like up sticks and move to Canada) Unless you want to swap houses.
We are coming back within the next 2 years!
Greatking
actually working from the house depends on the kind of job you do. let say you are into journalism, with such a job you could work from the house, that is after you go for your stories all you do is sit behind your computer and work on it. so is the job a of a sales person. but with that of a customer service person who works in an automobile company you would have to move to the office to meet clients whose vehicles are in the workshop, who may want to see the vehicle etc, even with sales you would have to show the customers the kinds of vehicles you sell so they can choose and buy. so like i said it depends on what a person does.
chasbeen
Thinking about turning peoples concepts around.
If we did not need to commute to work then maybe we only need one car. Maybe we don't need to work so much because fuel becomes cheaper.

Lots of maybe's but when?

In 1969 when men walked on the moon I thought they would be holding moon-soccer tournaments there by now.

But alas we are not.

That's a reason I ask the question, it's part of a much bigger question?

What am I thinking of Rolling Eyes ?
watersoul
chasbeen wrote:
Thinking about turning peoples concepts around.
If we did not need to commute to work then maybe we only need one car. Maybe we don't need to work so much because fuel becomes cheaper.

Lots of maybe's but when?

In 1969 when men walked on the moon I thought they would be holding moon-soccer tournaments there by now.

But alas we are not.

That's a reason I ask the question, it's part of a much bigger question?

What am I thinking of Rolling Eyes ?


Interesting thoughts fella and I know exectly what you mean.

Example of my situation, I could drive 25-35 miles in a couple of directions to cities that have lots more comparable work available for me than where I live. That would involve weekly fuel costs of about £40-£50 per week - but more like £50.00+ probably though, as depending on the direction, I have to drive between 7 and 17 miles before I get to any fast dual-carriageway/highways, with much stop-start on congested single lane roads.
Taking that into account, and the Hour+ of driving each way, I choose employment at the town I live. It saves at least 10 hours driving each week and also the fuel/car maintenance costs - not a small sum.

I have done the travelling thing in the past, but my quality of life was not enhanced by the higher wages further away, in fact it made me miserable and feel a slave to work. These days, I live 5-10 minutes walk from work/my Son's school/beaches/clifftops/town centre stores/cinema/bars/restaurants/bowling alley/rugby club/etc, and my car sometimes doesn't actually move for a week.

I appreciate that we can't all do that due to geography, but I moved here many years ago to make it happen. Yes I could earn more doing the miles, but I prefer the lower wage in a smaller town that doesn't cost me to get to work, and involves travelling time of a simple 4-5 minute walk each morning.

PS...and regarding your thoughts on the '69 moon landings and our expectations on the future, I'm still waiting for the hover-cars from sci-fi comics I read as a child! Lol Laughing
chasbeen
You are generally talking about different types of currencies.

Add them together and you are rich. Now you have time and your in good shape to get the full personal satisfaction available at work and/or the type of work you do.

It's coloured by being in charge of school age children which is a type of joy only available for a certain length of time during your children's growth cycle. It sounds like your not settling on anything less than all the potential joys parenthood will bring.

Past the kiddies at school thing myself. Want to get back to the UK now and when I do I might reach Utopia too!
watersoul
chasbeen wrote:
It sounds like your not settling on anything less than all the potential joys parenthood will bring.

Definitely true there, I'm on a mission to make as many happy memories as I can as a Dad, its also the reason I dropped my hours to 10am - 4pm(mon-fri), a childhood only happens once and I want to be a part of it as much as I can.
I've got 5 years before my plans change drastically again, and if/when my Son moves away to University, my instinct tells me its gonna be along the lines of working in the UK May to September, then travelling different parts of the world through the winter. I'll only be a phonecall/email/money transfer or flight away if he needs me - but gonna concentrate on enjoying the next 5 years first though.

chasbeen wrote:
Past the kiddies at school thing myself. Want to get back to the UK now and when I do I might reach Utopia too!

UK, Utopia?! ...I thought that was more likely to be found in Canada since so many Brits escape there each year (including my own relatives) Laughing


Back to your topic though, I'm wondering do you home work or commute? ...and what do you reckon about the benefits/downsides of whichever it is you do?
chasbeen
Quote:
UK, Utopia?! ...I thought that was more likely to be found in Canada since so many Brits escape there each year (including my own relatives) Laughing

I'm done with Ontario/Canada. However if I can pass any help along I will. If I knew then what I know now, I would have made the stay about 5 years. (That's removing all personal parameters from the equation)

Quote:
Back to your topic though, I'm wondering do you home work or commute? ...and what do you reckon about the benefits/downsides of whichever it is you do?


My own trade was flooded by "off shoring" I lost a substantial amount of my demand overnight and only had sufficient to get a permanent job on an average wage. I used to have a lovely commuter trip to work because I use to live in beautiful lake land. The snag with that was the dangers of winter driving.

I work in a very easy going job in IT. I do the work when i'm asked but it's semi-retirement compared to my freelance days. I cannot get work at home otherwise I would do. I live in the Canadian countryside in a large house with a swimming pool and Spa room. My commute to work is about 20 minutes now.
watersoul
chasbeen wrote:

I work in a very easy going job in IT. I do the work when i'm asked but it's semi-retirement compared to my freelance days. I cannot get work at home otherwise I would do. I live in the Canadian countryside in a large house with a swimming pool and Spa room. My commute to work is about 20 minutes now.


Dude, that sounds like Utopia!
A large house in the countryside (with a decent amount of land I guess) and a pool, in the UK, would be shockingly expensive!
Expect to downsize bigtime, and much bigger heating costs for your pool, remember how crap our summer's are!

...the 20 minute commute through beautiful scenery sounds nice though, better than the overcrowded, congested roads that are found on this tiny overpopulated island you want to come back to. If you do come back, I'd definitely suggest the SW England (where I am), less population density, gorgeous beaches, and it rarely drops below zero at the coast - in fact the snow last winter was the first for about 10 years Smile
chasbeen
Well this is good dialog

It's based on some fact.

I think I would appreciate England a bit more,

We were considering Weymouth (Used to build Bridges there when I was in the Engineers). However Ramsgate or Weymouth look swell.

My plan at the moment is to get a start of line train and work on a laptop until I get to the city where (hopefully) I can ply my trade.
Radar
Sometimes I've worked from home, simply communicating by e-mail, and works for a while. Ultimately though, you do need some face-to-face to just talk about issues that have arisen or debate the larger picture.

It's fine for individual tasks though.
chasbeen
Radar

There's the other extreme. Where I work I could have joined management or remained in Software development.
I chose the latter. (What I mean here is that people are too much at work and don't evenhave freedom of thought at work)

Those that chose management spend 80% of the time in meetings. They can pontificate for days on the colour something should be!

That's not for me.

The above is not supposed to be about any real people or actual place but are an extension of the authors imagination but related to his loose grasp of reality which may or may not have some semblance or use to the readers real situation.
Lady Elensar
I think personal contacts are better than contacts via the internet. You'll never know each other by not seeing them. I think it's important to know your colleagues very well so you know who you're dealing with.

And I won't like it, being every day at home. But there are many more reasons why I think people should not work at home, except for that you don't waste travel time etc. But working about 9 hours a day are still not 24, so there's enough travel time if you look at it the other way. I like to travel, no problems for me at all.
chasbeen
Lady "E" said:
Quote:
I think personal contacts are better than contacts via the internet. You'll never know each other by not seeing them. I think it's important to know your colleagues very well so you know who you're dealing with.


This is, I agree, a basic need inside of all of us. Without being gender biased I think this is an even higher need in females. (Gosh, I hope that does not sound like i'm "gender biased").

This is strange since people rate / need it more than getting paid almost!
Bluedoll
I think we need both, outside contacts and home at work to satisfy our needs. If we simply look at work as a social exercise where we exchange points, I mean money then it is all about activities. I think a full time writer is a class example of a solitude work style, all I need is my keyboard type of occupation but at some point socially a writer needs to connect and experience or fast go dull and down. As far as relationships, partnership and collaboration goes a physical meeting I think is far soupier for continued interchange down the road. Alternating between both home and out of house, I think is more acceptable than all homework but the ratio varies with the personality, not gender. Right?

soupier: recipe for success
chasbeen
BD
Your example of a writer is an interesting one.
His work place is outside a work environment and therefore when he leaves home to mix with people it is not with colleagues but with people. This is a 100% match. The writer can mix socially and at the same time call it "field research".

I still think a large number of people could reduce a reliance on people at work to make up their social life.

I'm not saying it's easy.
Insanity
There are often lots of meetings and conferences that go on that sometimes require you to be present. Of course, there's always using the phone to sit in, but that is hardly as effective as actually being there. And there's a disconnect between your boss seeing you at work and simply getting your work electronically.
chasbeen
Insanity

Thats a good one Laughing
Quote:
require you to be present

Notice how you feel you have to use the "Require" word.
If you are a specialist and you control how a job get's done you could cancel a lot of meetings.

Quote:
And there's a disconnect between your boss

I'm going to assume you mean your "Manager(s)". What do "Managers" do mostly?
If you are a specialist and you control how a job get's done you might be a bit insulted (and frustrated) wasting your time in too many meetings.

Ah! you say but i'm not in control how a job get's done..

The big picture is that there SHOULD be more specialists.

Then YOU and millions of others would not have to work 40hours (or whatever) because you'l get the necessary work done in half the time and probably get paid 3 X as much.
Bluedoll
I just remembered something while reading watersoul’s and your post chasbeen. You seem be looking at this from a personal view to your own life, as well as the bigger picture regarding how work is I mean and what can change into the future, right? I am certain it will but do remember seeing those old old predictions about what the future would look like. I am referring to the ones out of the 50’s that show flying machines, modernized contraptions and people walking around with less work hours and more leisure time. Well I guess it is true people for in the 80’s 90’s did have less working hours got all the new technology but only thing less money to spend. Laughing

My point though is if we look into the future at some things and select what seems the best scenario sometimes the practicality of it all, is not what you think is going to be. Well that’s ok I suppose, as long as you adjust and find what you are doing acceptable.
I would be happy following my own dream and managing my work life all on my own but I do doubt that everything around me would fit into my 'plan'. It is after all the real world?
chasbeen
Quote:
You seem be looking at this from a personal view to your own life

Maybe I have been around the block a bit and I fear I have some correct assumptions.

There is a certain amount of brainwashing going on to do what is expected.

It's not illegal to do a bit of thinking for ourselves and that is the big picture I think.
Well me at least Crying or Very sad
epspk
simply because its easier for them to control a slave in their territory. So if you work at home THEY can't control you.
chasbeen
epspk
"THEY" is the system.

There are good and bad things about the system. Like Clint Eastwood say's in "Dirty Harry" until someone comes up with another system we have to accept it for what it is.

He does not say he liked it
Exclamation
uchejohn
well owing to recent growth in information technology leading to the use of computer in virtually all aspect of business, there is need to reduce traffic congesion that usually occur at early and later hours of the day causes by workers.
Many people now stay at their home working 24hrs, may be doing some internet businesse, while some people still travell daily to their work place.
In general, most people will wish to stay at home and do their business but the limitation is the nature of their work.
Work at home is mainly best for internet business.
watersoul
As I've said previously, I chose to be office based a couple of months ago instead of visiting clients and doing my follow up work at home (emails/paperwork etc)
It's the best choice I've made for a long time! The comradery, banter, laughter, pseudo-flirtatious comments, couple of drinks after work on a Friday at the pub (2 doors up the road), all of it - brilliant.

I absolutely missed the human interaction with colleagues, and being home based is something I'd never want to do again unless I had to.
deanhills
watersoul wrote:
I absolutely missed the human interaction with colleagues, and being home based is something I'd never want to do again unless I had to.
Me to. For being on the exact wavelength there is nothing that beats a face to face to pick up on first rate information. There is a good chance that people won't put the whole picture in an e-mail as the printed word rarely contains all of that which is the truth. Also for making things happen communication of the first rate type, i.e. face to face is unbeatable. It is much easier to get someone to agree to do something in an informal face to face setting, than giving instructions in an e-mail.
macky
working at home will always be good for us to have more focus and concentration.... Smile
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