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Missouri Voters Reject Obamacare





jmi256
This sends a clear message to Democrats, and it will be interesting to see how they do in November as voters finally have a say on Obamacare. Almost 71% of Missouri voters have rejected Obama and the Democrats’ healthcare scheme that forces everyone to purchase insurance from the insurance companies, who gave millions in campaign contributions to Obama and the Democrats. While Obama and the Democrats may have thought giving this handout to their campaign contributors made sense, voters feel otherwise.
Quote:
Mo. voters reject key provision of health care law
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - Missouri voters on Tuesday overwhelmingly rejected a key provision of President Barack Obama's health care law, sending a clear message of discontent to Washington and Democrats less than 100 days before the midterm elections.
About 71 percent of Missouri voters backed a ballot measure, Proposition C, that would prohibit the government from requiring people to have health insurance or from penalizing them for not having it.
The Missouri law conflicts with a federal requirement that most people have health insurance or face penalties starting in 2014.
Tuesday's vote was seen as largely symbolic because federal law generally trumps state law. But it was also seen as a sign of growing voter disillusionment with federal policies and a show of strength by conservatives and the tea party movement.
"To us, it symbolized everything," said Annette Read, a tea party participant from suburban St. Louis who quit her online retail job to lead a yearlong campaign for the Missouri ballot measure. "The entire frustration in the country ... how our government has misspent, how they haven't listened to the people, this measure in general encompassed all of that."
Missouri's ballot also featured primaries for U.S. Senate, Congress and numerous state legislative seats. But at many polling places, voters said they were most passionate about the health insurance referendum.
"I believe that the general public has been duped about the benefits of the health care proposal," said Mike Sampson of Jefferson City, an independent emergency management contractor, who voted for the proposition. "My guess is federal law will in fact supersede state law, but we need to send a message to the folks in Washington, D.C., that people in the hinterlands are not happy."
The health care referendum was helped by a high Republican turnout. In Missouri's open primaries, voters do not have to register their party affiliation. But far more people picked Republican ballots than Democratic ones Tuesday.
Republican lawmakers originally wanted to place the measure on Missouri's November ballot in the form of a state constitutional amendment. But to avoid a Democratic filibuster in the state Senate, they agreed to scale it back to a proposed law and place it on the primary ballot.
Legislatures in Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana and Virginia have passed similar statutes without referring them to the ballot, and voters in Arizona and Oklahoma will vote on such measures as state constitutional amendments in November. Missouri was the first state to challenge aspects of the federal law in a referendum.
The intent of the federal requirement is to broaden the pool of healthy people covered by insurers, thus holding down premiums that otherwise would rise because of separate provisions prohibiting insurers from denying coverage to people with poor health or pre-existing conditions.
But the insurance requirement has been one of the most contentious parts of the new federal law. Public officials in well over a dozen states, including Missouri, have filed lawsuits claiming Congress overstepped its constitutional authority by requiring citizens to buy health insurance.
Federal courts are expected to weigh in well before the insurance requirement takes effect about whether the federal health care overhaul is constitutional.
The Missouri Hospital Association spent $400,000 warning people that passage of the ballot measure could increase hospitals' costs for treating the uninsured, but there was little opposition to the measure from either grass-roots organizations or from the unions and consumer groups that backed the federal overhaul.
Some Missouri voters who opposed the ballot measure cited a potential cost-shift to those who have insurance if some people are allowed to continue visiting emergency rooms without insurance. Other opponents of Missouri's ballot measure said they wanted to give Obama's health care plan a chance to work.
"I don't think people should be walking around sick," said Kathy Ward, a 57-year-old Columbia nurse, who voted against Missouri's law. "The fact remains, people have the right to have health care, and they should get it. It help makes a healthier society."

Source = http://apnews.myway.com/article/20100804/D9HCF3I80.html
ocalhoun
Nice for them to be able to express it, but so far everyone says this is non-binding and will not actually change anything about it.

Did the final version of the bill still have the sate-by-state opt out option?
jmi256
ocalhoun wrote:
Nice for them to be able to express it, but so far everyone says this is non-binding and will not actually change anything about it.

Did the final version of the bill still have the sate-by-state opt out option?

It's definitely more symbolic of the voters’ rejection of the bill than binding, but I think it does help the Constitutional challenge that will be coming up soon enough. I don't recall seeing any state opt-out/opt-in provision in the bill, but it's huge and I sure didn't memorize every bit when I read it.
ocalhoun
jmi256 wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
Nice for them to be able to express it, but so far everyone says this is non-binding and will not actually change anything about it.

Did the final version of the bill still have the sate-by-state opt out option?

It's definitely more symbolic of the voters’ rejection of the bill than binding, but I think it does help the Constitutional challenge that will be coming up soon enough. I don't recall seeing any state opt-out/opt-in provision in the bill, but it's huge and I sure didn't memorize every bit when I read it.

Well, mid-way through the debate, there was talk of letting states vote to opt out of it, and from what I heard, that provision made it into at least one version of the bill...
Question is, did it make it into the final version?
deanhills
jmi256 wrote:
It's definitely more symbolic of the voters’ rejection of the bill than binding, but I think it does help the Constitutional challenge that will be coming up soon enough.
When do you see that coming? Do you know of any articles about this? Am quite interested in this issue. Smile
tasdizayn
i dont like obama
Bikerman
It is worth remembering that the turnout was low (around 35%) and heavily skewed towards republicans (65% of those who voted) because the Democrat primary was not so closely fought as the republican....
jmi256
Bikerman wrote:
It is worth remembering that the turnout was low (around 35%) and heavily skewed towards republicans (65% of those who voted) because the Democrat primary was not so closely fought as the republican....


Why? Not sure I see your point, but willing to hear you out.
Voodoocat
I wonder if the higher Republican turnout indicates that Republicans are more motivated this election season than Democrats. Obama has certainly ticked off Republicans; this could very likely motivate them to turn out in large numbers. November will be very interesting.
deanhills
Voodoocat wrote:
I wonder if the higher Republican turnout indicates that Republicans are more motivated this election season than Democrats. Obama has certainly ticked off Republicans; this could very likely motivate them to turn out in large numbers. November will be very interesting.
I wonder how many of those Republicans included disappointed Democrats?
Bikerman
jmi256 wrote:
Bikerman wrote:
It is worth remembering that the turnout was low (around 35%) and heavily skewed towards republicans (65% of those who voted) because the Democrat primary was not so closely fought as the republican....


Why? Not sure I see your point, but willing to hear you out.

The republican competition was much closer than the democratic nomination, hence more republicans turned out to get their man in...
http://www.sos.mo.gov/enrweb/statewideresults.asp?eid=283

I'm not saying it isn't a significant vote, merely pointing out that the number voting for prop C was only marginally (6%) more than the number of republicans who voted anyway, so although it indicates a fairly solid republican 'No', it doesn't say too much about the core democrat vote...
jmi256
Bikerman wrote:
jmi256 wrote:
Bikerman wrote:
It is worth remembering that the turnout was low (around 35%) and heavily skewed towards republicans (65% of those who voted) because the Democrat primary was not so closely fought as the republican....


Why? Not sure I see your point, but willing to hear you out.

The republican competition was much closer than the democratic nomination, hence more republicans turned out to get their man in...
http://www.sos.mo.gov/enrweb/statewideresults.asp?eid=283

I'm not saying it isn't a significant vote, merely pointing out that the number voting for prop C was only marginally (6%) more than the number of republicans who voted anyway, so although it indicates a fairly solid republican 'No', it doesn't say too much about the core democrat vote...


Don't you think this could also be seen as an issue vote? Democrats here have been banking on the idea that their passing of Obamacare would somehow rally their base, but it seems that they haven't done so and the base couldn't be bothered to come out and vote to support it. People opposed to Obamacare, however, did show up.

I think it speaks to Obama and the Democrats' misconception of how we would react to Obamacare once it was passed.

You’re also assuming all Republicans voted against Obamacare, which is the same as saying all Democrats voted for it. I haven’t seen that to be the case, and if anything, many Democrats are rejecting Obamacare.
Bikerman
I don't know - that is essentially what I am saying. I don't think the data is clear enough to make a clear assessment either way. It would not be surprising if most republican voters were against the Obama healthcare system and it seems odd that democrats would stay at home in such large numbers if they wanted to register a protest. It seems to indicate that those opposed feel more strongly than those not opposed or supportive.
I'm actually quite surprised that support seems to have held at the level it has - roughly 50% - given the current financial situation in the US - I expected the numbers to slide pretty quickly. It does look like there is some movement over the last month or two but it is difficult to get good data - wiki is probably as balanced as it gets but it is a little behind, obviously...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_opinion_on_health_care_reform_in_the_United_States#2010_polling_results
jmi256
Bikerman wrote:
I don't know - that is essentially what I am saying. I don't think the data is clear enough to make a clear assessment either way. It would not be surprising if most republican voters were against the Obama healthcare system and it seems odd that democrats would stay at home in such large numbers if they wanted to register a protest. It seems to indicate that those opposed feel more strongly than those not opposed or supportive.
I'm actually quite surprised that support seems to have held at the level it has - roughly 50% - given the current financial situation in the US - I expected the numbers to slide pretty quickly. It does look like there is some movement over the last month or two but it is difficult to get good data - wiki is probably as balanced as it gets but it is a little behind, obviously...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_opinion_on_health_care_reform_in_the_United_States#2010_polling_results


I haven’t seen any kind of data to suggest anything, just opinion (I’m not trying to single you out, but talking in general). But the results of the vote are clear; Almost 71% of Missouri voters voted against Obamacare. It appears the rejection of Obama and the Democrats’ policies is nationwide, and even people within the Democratic Party are turning their nose up at what Obama and the leaders of the Democrats forced down the nation’s throat. It looks like their hope that “the masses will like it when they understand it better” is also a failure, and it will be interesting to see how those who voted in favor of Obamacare are voted out next month in response to their following Obama and the Democratic Party leadership.


Quote:
POLL: Dislike of healthcare law crosses party lines, 1 in 4 Dems want repeal

Healthcare reform is hurting the reelection chances of freshman Democrats in the House, according to The Hill/ANGA poll.

A majority of voters in key battleground districts favor repeal of the legislative overhaul Congress passed this year.

President Obama predicted in the spring that the new law would become popular as people learned more about it. But the poll shows Republicans strongly oppose it, independents are wary of it and a surprising number of Democrats also want it overturned.

Republicans have vowed to repeal the law if they take control of Congress, and the findings of Mark Penn, who led Penn Schoen Berland’s polling team, show that healthcare is a major issue for voters this year.

When asked if they wanted the legislation repealed, 56 percent of voters in the surveyed districts said yes. “Only Democrats were opposed to repeal (23 percent to 64 percent),” Penn said. “Undecided voters wanted the healthcare law repealed by 49 percent to 27 percent.”

In each district, a majority of those surveyed said they want the controversial law gone.

Sixty-five percent back repeal in Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick’s (D-Ariz.) district, while only 27 percent oppose such an effort. Kirkpatrick voted for healthcare reform.

Fifty-nine percent of those polled in Rep. Debbie Halvorson’s (D-Ill.) district back a repeal, with 29 percent against. More than one in four Democrats polled also favor repeal. Halvorson was a late yes vote on healthcare reform and is now 18 points behind her Republican challenger.

Republicans say they will “repeal and replace” Obama’s health law, although they privately acknowledge that eradicating it will not be possible until they control the White House.

Still, The Hill/ANGA poll suggests that the GOP attacks against what they call “ObamaCare” may be working.

Independent voters, who strongly supported Obama’s presidential bid, have a negative view of his most significant domestic policy achievement.

Rep. Harry Teague (D-N.M.) voted no on the healthcare overhaul and that position is consistent with his district, where 49 percent of Democrats favor repeal and 46 percent oppose it. Sixty-one percent of independents in Teague’s district back a repeal.

Teague is trailing in his race with former Rep. Steve Pearce (R-N.M.) by four percentage points, the poll found.

Penn said, “I was most surprised at the strong discontent with healthcare [reform]. I thought that there was continued discontent but that it had moderated from what we’re seeing in these districts.”

He added, “Most people actually favor repeal of the healthcare legislation, and that included 54 percent of the independents. So outside of the Democratic Party, healthcare legislation has come out as a net negative.”

Of the 12 districts polled, only one fell within the margin of error on repeal. Forty-four percent support repeal while 41 percent oppose it in Rep. Mary Jo Kilroy’s (D-Ohio) district. Kilroy backed healthcare reform and is 9 points down in her race against Republican Steve Stivers.

Rep. Kathy Dahlkemper’s (D-Pa.) decision to back healthcare reform is hobbling her. In his summary of findings, Penn writes that “57 percent of respondents [in the district] believe that the healthcare legislation … should be repealed. Undecided voters feel this way by a margin of 45 percent to 33 percent.”

The Hill/ANGA poll finds that Dahlkemper is trailing 13 points behind her Republican challenger.

Republicans and independents in Rep. Dina Titus’s (D-Nev.) district fit the same pattern, only more so. Almost two-thirds of independents there want the law scrapped. Titus, who voted yes on reform, is in a tight race against Republican Joe Heck.

Rep. Frank Kratovil (D-Md.) voted against reform, and that appears to be helping his reelection bid. Kratovil is only three points behind his GOP challenger in a district where nearly one in three Democrats back repeal.

The Hill/ANGA poll surveyed 4,809 likely voters via phone interviews from Sept. 25 through Sept. 30 in 12 competitive congressional districts. The margin of error was plus or minus 1.4 percent, with the margins being higher in subgroups.

Source = http://thehill.com/house-polls/the-hill-anga-poll-week-1/122851-distaste-for-healthcare-law-crosses-party-lines
Bikerman
I hardly think a few months is sufficient for people to have formed a settled opinion and the fact that the polls keep changing would tend to support that.
It will require at least a few years before people can do any sensible cost-benefit analysis personally.
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