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Your photography techniques





Ankhanu
I'm far from an expert, or even a good amateur, but I think I've probably been developing a bit of a style in my photography. I thought it could be interesting to discuss and/or reveal some of the technique tendencies we use when taking a picture. Please, chime in with some of your techniques you use on a regular basis! I'd love to hear how you approach using your camera to get what you want.

I'm a lover of macro photography; getting up close and revealing the little things we tend to overlook day to day. I think this has greatly influenced how I compose/frame a shot. I'll list a couple aspects of how my macro love has influenced how I shoot:
.: I find that I tend to shoot at low angles; getting down close to the ground, "eye to eye" as it were, or even shoot from below.
.: I look for interesting textures or shadows
.: I tend to work with a shallow depth of field/focus (DOF)
I'm not sure that my tendency to place the focal point of an image in the lower right or left of the frame comes from macro or just a general photographic principle, but it's something I tend to do. Shallow DOF is partially borne of wanting to focus on a small detail, but also comes from my tendency to shoot, camera-in-hand, in low light without flash. This got me in the habit of using wide apertures as much as possible to ensure that I could take a clear picture with minimal hand-shake. I've begun using flash a bit more, but still have to get the hang of it; the extra weight on the camera makes getting close/steady more difficult; but the faster shutter speed is nice Razz In general, I dislike pixel/film noise, so try and use as low an ISO as possible. Sometimes noise is appropriate, but I don't work with it very well.

Classically, I would ONLY shoot found scenes. I would not set up a shot in any way, but try and find interesting scenes to document. I've started to change that a little, primarily due to my lack of a real macro lens and the hand-held shooting limitations that imposes on me (I simply can't hold a camera completely steady for 0.5-25 seconds). Much of my recent macro work has been done indoors with the camera on a tripod rather than in my hand, and I've acquired items to shoot and set up in an interesting way. This has brought me some shots that I never would have taken if I simply shot things where they were. I still prefer to search around and discover interesting things, but something a little more "studio" has become much more viable to me now.

Examples of my shots are posted on my livejournal.
dragonwx
I Dont Understating you
TurtleShell
My partner has gotten a little into amateur photography. Which is to say, she bought a $400 digital rebel and a $200 lens for it about 1 year later. She really only takes photographs of our family stuff, trips we go on, and also a lot of flowers. I'm not sure this will ever turn into a serious hobby for her, but she has filled up her entire hard drive with some major large pictures.

I like her camera too becuase I'm an artist, and it comes in handy to have a good camera when taking pictures of paintings for long distance clients.
dude_xyx
I'm addicted to Nature and Macro Photography. I love to take photos of tiny flowers and ceatures you wouldn't see properly in real. It's pretty hard but worth every minute.
rogue_skydragon
I absolutely adore photography...the act of capturing a moment in time and conveying the precise mood and feel of that moment to a spectator is something which bears a sort of spiritual aura. Part of being a good photographer is simply paying attention to the way light behaves. If you understand how light is going to fall upon a subject in a certain scenario and understand how to manipulate the light (whether in-camera or by playing with lights manually) to convey a particular mood....you're golden
nebunaticu
the photograpy is beautefull in the nature
Ankhanu
That's all well and good, but how do you go about your photography? How do you find yourself setting your camera, how do you go about framing the shot, what do you look for to capture? The idea behind the thread is to share your methods, what makes your photographs yours; how do you stand apart from others?
LittleBlackKitten
I generally tend to be attracted to macro shots, land/sea/sky scapes, and animals. I have taken some still life and architecture, but 99% of my art tends to be the aforementioned. I always (almost) use my telephoto lens; I find it to take better macro shots than my 18-75mm! I sacrifice standing close to the subject, but then I get that nice telephoto effect!
ajitha999
the above comments are very beautiful and gud luck Embarassed Embarassed Embarassed
rohan5039
This should be take in to consideration that when you have to take a pose from your camera in day light. Try to take a snap opposite from the sunlight like this you will get better response and better pictures. The results of your picutres will good. Light settings effects the results of your final snaps
dude_xyx
LittleBlackKitten wrote:
I generally tend to be attracted to macro shots, land/sea/sky scapes, and animals. I have taken some still life and architecture, but 99% of my art tends to be the aforementioned. I always (almost) use my telephoto lens; I find it to take better macro shots than my 18-75mm! I sacrifice standing close to the subject, but then I get that nice telephoto effect!


I only have a ultrazoom camera not a DSLR camera. So I can't use real macro lenses or any external heavy lenses. So I use Raynox DCR-250 Super Macro Filter. This one is really cool. It can be used with my Canon SX10 by attaching it to the lens barrel. not too heavy and only cost me 50$.

Photos I have taken using this Macro filter are here,

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dudexyx/

I made a topic here and posted posted more photos but I don't remember where it was. ^ ^
TheGremlyn
I like getting up close and personal with the subject. I've had better luck with getting pictures of cats because they have a variety of facial expressions. I also love their eyes. I try and really get close and personal and I like to try and get their eyes to stand out. Sometimes I get serious cat looks and sometimes I get playful looks. I like taking pictures of guinea pigs but they always look freaked out when their eyes are wide open.

I wish I had some real money to invest in my own DSLR and perhaps a macro lens and other lenses. I love some of the effects and I want them to be more natural. My little digital camera is great but the digital effects that manipulate the photo to make it seem like I have a fish eye lens or something that gives the impression of the miniature effects are okay... But I want it to be more somehow.

I'd also agree that a faster shutter speed is preferred and working with a flash can be difficult. I've never liked the way it can impact colour but it might be I don't know how to use it. I prefer natural light and the way the natural light plays on the subject...
mochipie
Hmm I think I have pretty similar photography techniques as you. Smile I pretty much always shoot found scenes, but then that's probably because I'm too lazy to set anything up. Definitely like taking spontaneous and natural shots more than a studio-like set up though.

Love shallow DOF as well. I mean, all that bokeh! (Yeah, that's the main draw for me. I understand that a shallow DOF helps in low light conditions as well, what with the quicker shutter speed, but the aesthetic appeal is what pretty much makes me keep my aperture under f5 usually. Even on those landscape shots, which is probably somewhat naive of me but that's ok.
therimalaya
I've also some similar technique, some of them are:

1. Imagine two vertical and two horizontal grid. The viewer always has concentration on those grid and their intersection, so place the important and focused objects on those area that will drag the viewers attention toward the point where you want.

2. Always try to capture the nearer object along with far one, that will create depth in the photograph. Photograph with depth are always attractive.

3. Try to put the horizon on the upper gird if the lower part is more valuable or put it in the lower gird if you want to capture the sky.

4. Always consider the light and don't let the light ruin your photograph.

5. One interesting thing: If there is strong light in the background and your photograph is appeared black, try using flash, it will somehow solve the problem.

These are some of my technique and i know some of them are professional and some are very amateur.

Wish you luck for good photographs.
spinout
I use thee Vintage camera application on my android phone. It can tilt it lika a polaroid camera and many other retro ways!
Ankhanu
Since writing my initial post I have begun using flash/strobe somewhat more, including in macro photography. My equipment hasn't changed, but I'm finding myself in poor lighting far too often to get a decent shot without the strobe. Most of the time, I have the flash mounted to the camera, and bounce the flash off a wall or other surface, avoiding direct light... But, I've also been experimenting with directed light from differing angles and intensity. To do this, I use a tripod and hold the strobe in my hand and use the modelling flash feature (normally used in quick bursts to see how shadows fall before shooting) that pulses a low-intensity strobe. Using a relatively long shutter speed, while the shutter is open, I position the flash at the angle I want and hold the modelling flash trigger for as long as I think I need it. This way I can have light coming from top, bottom, right, left and rotated in front or behind the subject... changing the angle can really change the end result!
abhizz
My favorites are Nature and Animal photography
rotoruaboy
woo a photography thread, and a friendly one too. Proud Nikon owner here. hmmm what do I have to contribute.?

1. I rarely use manual mode, except for situations like portraits and landscape. Mostly I use Aperture priority mode, that saves a lot of hassle when shooting events and when you are on the go.

2.Develop your own style, don't like the camera's light meter or any other equipment readings limit your talent. They work for your and not the other way around.
neha46101
I like the Animals and nature photos ...........i am also collecting the nature photos ..........my favotite hobby is photography........ Very Happy
Ankhanu
neha46101 wrote:
I like the Animals and nature photos ...........i am also collecting the nature photos ..........my favotite hobby is photography........ Very Happy

Great!
How do you approach taking your shots, though? That's actually the intent of this thread; describing how you shoot what you shoot and what you like, not simply what you like as a subject. It's instructional! Smile
fuzzkaizer
some things i can admit for myself, taking photos:
i despise the flash, because i love the 'real' light, i find pleasure in strolling around taking a look at the things, trying to descover something, having an eye for interesting or pleasant pictures, so that in the end i wouldn't even need a camera to see good pictures... that's also why i also search for an interesting picture, rather than arranging something for the camera... that's also why i like the macro.

of course, that always turns out to be a fight with the conditions of light, because i'm not that skilled.

about 6 years ago i started to use a digital camera, so i stopped to care about the lenses and the manual adjustments, but i really do miss that!
now that they are producing quite affordable digital cameras which can adapt to the good old lenses, it's just a matter of time that i buy one and start using the old lenses again. it's great to have a good macro, also a pleasure to have a very wide angle sometimes...
Radar
I'm not a professional photographer, but I do take a good deal of photos. I need to learn the ins and outs of DSLR and techniques.

At the moment, I'm more driven by the content of the photo than the quality, so framing and subject are the controlling factors.
chatrack
Hi,

I am interested to know about video camera stabilizers , that can be home made.
It seem lot a difference, when a camera is simply hand held than put on a camera stabilizer
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