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CHANGE: OBAMA'S HISTORIC HEALTH CARE REFORM WINS





handfleisch
Let's celebrate.

We just passed the best patient protections in history. No more arbitrary premium hikes, insurance cancellations when you get sick, and no more discrimination against pre-existing conditions. We've thrown out that stuff and put in subsidies for people who can't afford insurance. We can look forward to less bankruptcies and a better quality of life for Americans.

My nephew's 30-year-old friend died yesterday. She had heart problems, was told she needed an operation, but with no insurance or ability to pay, she never got it. So she died. That's been happening 45,000 times per year in the USA. We just took a big step towards making sure it never happens again.

I cannot help but contrast the Bush administration to the Obama administration. Bush had a Republican congress, a budget surplus from Clinton, and historic levels of public support after the 9/11 attack. Did he try to fix the health care problem? No, he invaded Iraq.

Generations fought for this, and with Obama we have accomplished something very difficult and courageous, very positive and long overdue. We fought against lies like "death panels", when the real death panel has been the status quo. We have achieved historic change and we should be proud.

deanhills
I think it is too early for celebrations. There is a saying that the proof is usually in the pudding, and with this legislation it is in the money that still has to be made available and voted on to fund it, and how willing or financially able the individual States will be to follow this legislation. Quite a number of States have indicated that they may introduce legislation to opt out of the Health Reform Bill. If more than two thirds of the States do that, it can effectively be the end of the Bill there and then.

Besides which 219-212 is hardly an overwhelming victory. It is enough of a touch and go for the legislation to become a really hard issue during the Congress elections later in the year.
Quote:
To pay for the changes, the legislation includes more than $400 billion in higher taxes over a decade and cuts more than $500 billion from planned payments to hospitals, nursing homes, hospices and other providers that treat Medicare patients.

Yahoo!News
handfleisch
Another great thing this bill does is improve the entire student loan process while cutting out government subsidies to banks for private student loans. This will save 8-10 Billion tax dollars a year, which will now stay in government funds instead of gong to the banks, to supply even more direct student loans from the federal government. Also, loan paypack will be based on actual income, instead of a flat rate. Also, students with both private and government backed loans will now be able
to consolidate these loans and pay them off as one, and this is even retroactive.

See http://www.rules.house.gov/111_hr4872_secbysec.html
Afaceinthematrix
I am happy that Obama has finally done something that I consider worthwhile? Is it perfect? No. Is it really universal health care? No. But I do not of expect it to be this early in the game. Is it a step in the right direction? Definitely. It would be basically impossible to get universal health care quickly and so it essentially needs to be done step by step. The first thing that needs to happen is that this needs to be tested for a while. Then we can slowly, step by step, make improvements and the system that most Americans truly want.
menino
I think the healthcare bill is overdue for some time now, and yet, its not perfect, but will benefit most people, and I belive "All" americans. Insurance companies stocks have risen a bit on this, and we can only wait and see what happens, but its still a start on some good lines.

Regarding the student loans, thats quite a nice thing for people who want to go to college and get an education. I've heard of people in their mid 30's still trying to pay off student loans.
If its based on actual income, this makes a lot of sense.

Hopefully these ideas will be incorporated into other countries as part of their policies for education and healthcare.
deanhills
menino wrote:
Hopefully these ideas will be incorporated into other countries as part of their policies for education and healthcare.
Which countries are you thinking about, and what ideas should they be incorporating in their education and healthcare?
liljp617
I'd like more cost control, but this is a decent step in the right direction. A couple things I like that aren't getting attention: Tax increases on indoor tanning services, which I find to be one of the most ridiculous services currently in business, and requiring fast food services to place calorie counts next to certain menu items.
Bikerman
menino wrote:
Regarding the student loans, thats quite a nice thing for people who want to go to college and get an education. I've heard of people in their mid 30's still trying to pay off student loans.
If its based on actual income, this makes a lot of sense.

Hopefully these ideas will be incorporated into other countries as part of their policies for education and healthcare.
I think you will find that a lot of us 'other' countries are way ahead of the US, not behind (presuming you regard this as a step forward).
Student loans here in the UK are paid back when you earn enough to afford it (based on a sliding scale of income). I shouldn't really have to mention that we also have a National Health Service, but I will anyway.
ocalhoun
handfleisch wrote:
Another great thing this bill does is improve the entire student loan process while cutting out government subsidies to banks for private student loans. This will save 8-10 Billion tax dollars a year, which will now stay in government funds instead of gong to the banks, to supply even more direct student loans from the federal government. Also, loan paypack will be based on actual income, instead of a flat rate. Also, students with both private and government backed loans will now be able
to consolidate these loans and pay them off as one, and this is even retroactive.

See http://www.rules.house.gov/111_hr4872_secbysec.html


But why was it thrown in with the health care bill, and not voted on separately?

I wonder what else we might find in all those pages...
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
I wonder what else we might find in all those pages...
Right, all 2,309 pages of legalese. I have to marvel whether all those people who voted on the Bill, actually read all of those pages! If you want to read it, it has been posted on a Government Website:
http://budget.house.gov/doc-library/FY2010/03.15.2010_reconciliation2010.PDF
handfleisch
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
I wonder what else we might find in all those pages...
Right, all 2,309 pages of legalese. I have to marvel whether all those people who voted on the Bill, actually read all of those pages! If you want to read it, it has been posted on a Government Website:
http://budget.house.gov/doc-library/FY2010/03.15.2010_reconciliation2010.PDF

Yep start reading you two, be the first to discover the secret death panel paragraph
deanhills
handfleisch wrote:
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
I wonder what else we might find in all those pages...
Right, all 2,309 pages of legalese. I have to marvel whether all those people who voted on the Bill, actually read all of those pages! If you want to read it, it has been posted on a Government Website:
http://budget.house.gov/doc-library/FY2010/03.15.2010_reconciliation2010.PDF

Yep start reading you two, be the first to discover the secret death panel paragraph
Which page is it on? I did a search and did not find anything about a secret death panel. Confused
evaristobh
mano isso e verdade???
pq se for e inutil
ocalhoun
handfleisch wrote:
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
I wonder what else we might find in all those pages...
Right, all 2,309 pages of legalese. I have to marvel whether all those people who voted on the Bill, actually read all of those pages! If you want to read it, it has been posted on a Government Website:
http://budget.house.gov/doc-library/FY2010/03.15.2010_reconciliation2010.PDF

Yep start reading you two, be the first to discover the secret death panel paragraph

Secret death panel paragraph? Probably not. Certainly not in those words.
(Without a 'public option', death panels can't really exist, or will the government order insurance companies not to pay in some circumstances?)

I'd expect to find several places where large allocations of funds are used for questionable purposes, and probably some other completely unrelated legislation that should have been voted on separately though.
handfleisch
A newborn baby has been denied health insurance for a pre-existing heart condition. As his father said, "How can he have a pre-existing condition if the baby didn't exist until now?". Let's be glad, though, that as of September when the part of the Obama health care reform about pre-existing conditions goes into effect, this will never happen again in the USA.

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2010/03/26/91120/texas-newborn-denied-health-insurance.html

http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/03/25/2068267/crowley-newborn-with-heart-defect.html#tvg
Quote:

Texas newborn denied health insurance over pre-existing condition

At birth, Houston Tracy let out a single loud cry before his father cut the cord and handed him to a nurse.

Instantly, Doug Tracy knew something was wrong with his son.

"He wasn't turning pink fast enough," Tracy said. "When they listened to his chest, they realized he had an issue."

That turned out to be d-transposition of the great arteries, a defect in which the two major vessels that carry blood away from the heart are reversed. The condition causes babies to turn blue.

Surgery would correct it, but within days of Houston's birth March 15, Tracy learned that his application for health insurance to cover his son had been denied. The reason: a pre-existing condition.

"How can he have a pre-existing condition if the baby didn't exist until now?" Tracy asked.

New federal legislation that will prevent insurance companies from denying children coverage based on a pre-existing condition comes too late for the Tracys. The legislation, passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama this week, won't go into effect until September.

But Houston, who is hospitalized at Cook Children's Medical Center in Fort Worth, needs coverage now.

Without surgery, babies with this condition often die soon after birth, although some may live as long as a year, said Dr. Steve Muyskens, a pediatric cardiologist.

"In his case, we had to intervene in the first days of life," Muyskens said.
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