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If Ocarina of Time Was Released Today ...





Nameless
... it would be criticised for its lack of innovation and features, generally mocked for its poor story dungeon to dungeon, and universally scorned for horrendously backwards graphics. This, for the same game that remains lauded as one the greatest even to this day.

Context certainly plays a significant part in our perception of worth, yet the games we are judging do not degrade over time; OoT contains the same challenge, the same graphics, the same repeated NPC lines as it did when it was first released. The player changes, of course, and there is something to be said for experiencing innovation in lieu of similar gameplay re-released with a paint job. But the fact that people do still play and enjoy an older game years after its advances have become par for the course should demonstrate that innovation is not necessary for an enjoyable experience. Why is it, then, that reviewers (and many developers along with them!) are so focused on what has or hasn't been done before, how slightly more realistic a graphic design may be, or utilising some modern hardware gimmick to no more enjoyment?

It seems particularly strange in comparison to other fields of entertainment. Movies are not decried for lack of 3D and literature forms have remained more or less stable for centuries. A poor execution may be criticised, but most readers recognise the reuse of centuries old tropes without expecting every new soap opera to somehow advance the formula. Perhaps most tellingly, football fans don't bitch and moan when a new season is revealed to use the same gameplay, settings and characters as the last.

What makes another fantasy, turn-based JRPG or WWII FPS so different, that it cannot be appreciated objectively?
weableandbob
I have to disagree. If it was released now (albeit with updated graphics), it would still have great gameplay, despite the lack of innovation. There's a reason a lot of people say it's the best zelda game ever.
amperx
it wouldnt really matter that much even if its released at this time, it would have goo dgraphics though, but it will still keep your o so loved storyline Very Happy
LostOverThere
Perhaps, we also must believe that if it were released today, many of the innovations it came with wouldn't have been invented. I'm sure Z-Targeting would still be considered innovative if it wasn't used until today.

Likewise, things like the graphics were considered great because they were great for its time. Assuming the game was used in the same context today, the graphics would have to be great for now. Unless of course, you mean released identically as is, in which case the graphics would, as you said, be scrutinised.
Ankhanu
LostOverThere wrote:
Perhaps, we also must believe that if it were released today, many of the innovations it came with wouldn't have been invented. I'm sure Z-Targeting would still be considered innovative if it wasn't used until today.

Likewise, things like the graphics were considered great because they were great for its time. Assuming the game was used in the same context today, the graphics would have to be great for now. Unless of course, you mean released identically as is, in which case the graphics would, as you said, be scrutinised.


Exactly. The OP assumes that without this game introducing features that are now common place that they would have existed anyway. Chances are this is true, but the games that introduced them would take Ocarina of Time's place... granted that they implemented them as well as Zelda did.

Yeah, the graphics, if released exactly as they were would e considered pretty poor, but in terms of game play, Ocarina of Time has held up pretty well.
PureReborn
I agree that gaming is one of the mediums that evolves the fastest, but the old classics are still fun partly due to nostalgia but mostly because they are truly great games.

Having a Wii really help me realize this since I can boot up old N64 games and play them. I think that the zelda series holds up really well in time just because the gameplay is pretty unique. A shooter or RTS would feel oudated pretty quickly but I just played a link to the past remade on the GBA and I still loved every bit of it.
LostOverThere
Quote:

I agree that gaming is one of the mediums that evolves the fastest, but the old classics are still fun partly due to nostalgia but mostly because they are truly great games.


Having a Wii really help me realize this since I can boot up old N64 games and play them. I think that the zelda series holds up really well in time just because the gameplay is pretty unique. A shooter or RTS would feel oudated pretty quickly but I just played a link to the past remade on the GBA and I still loved every bit of it.

Quite true, especially with the shooter part. I imagine though that Zelda games out feeling out dated links back to the first part of your post. More shooters exist on the market, meaning more innovation (theoretically). In contrast, there are substantially less adventure/exploration titles on the market, technically suggest that less innovation would occur.

Of course, the shooter genre has been given a bad wrap over being "generic". Wink
microkosm
It would be November 21, 1998. Shocked
camperkid
I think people are more likely to hold on to old games, if they played them when they originally where launched. A game like Ocarina was amazing on many levels when it came out, and many of it's elements have been adopted as standards in game design since. However someone who did not play it when it first came out are likely to choose the newer games that have improved the formula instead. For example: I've heard allot of good things said about the first zelda games, but they haven't lived up to all the praise IMHO. I think it has allot to do with how we get emotionally attached to the games we like, the familiar storyline, the memorable theme tunes etc. And if our initial play through was enjoyable enough, then we will enjoy it again even several years later, when the game is no longer the latest innovation or technical achievement. That, I believe, is what makes some games, not just the greatest games of their time, but the greatest games of all time.
LostOverThere
Quote:

I think people are more likely to hold on to old games, if they played them when they originally where launched. A game like Ocarina was amazing on many levels when it came out, and many of it's elements have been adopted as standards in game design since. However someone who did not play it when it first came out are likely to choose the newer games that have improved the formula instead. For example: I've heard allot of good things said about the first zelda games, but they haven't lived up to all the praise IMHO. I think it has allot to do with how we get emotionally attached to the games we like, the familiar storyline, the memorable theme tunes etc. And if our initial play through was enjoyable enough, then we will enjoy it again even several years later, when the game is no longer the latest innovation or technical achievement.

Good point. By most accounts, Twilight Princess is far superior to Ocarina of Time, despite this many people like Ocarina of Time much more. I'd put this down to a number of reasons. Firstly, it was more revolutionary at it's time. Secondly, people remember the good things about it, and not the bad.

Mark my words, when the next Zelda game comes out people will claim how brilliant Twilight Princess was - no matter how brilliant the new release is. Think precisely what people think of Wind Waker now. Wink
camperkid
I agree, it takes something very unique and revolutionary, in order for a game to go down in history.

Apparently the next Zelda game will be announced at this years E3, so we should soon find out if this will be another trendsetter Smile
LostOverThere
Quote:

Apparently the next Zelda game will be announced at this years E3, so we should soon find out if this will be another trendsetter

Nah, we'll find out another release later whether it will be a trendsetter.

Everyone "hates" Twilight Princess at the moment and suddenly loves the Wind Waker. I guarantee when the next Zelda comes out people will suddenly say how great Twilight Princess is and how the new one sucks.

That's nostalgia for you. People remember the good over the bad. Rolling Eyes
camperkid
Well sure, the biggest leaps are always, when a new gaming system is introduced, but it can still be amazing running on more or less the same engine, as long as the game play is unique and innovative. For example one of my favourite zelda games of all time is Majoras Mask, which you would think had been overshadowed by Ocarina, but it still got amazing reviews and remains one of my fondest video game experiences.
milleja46
Well maybe if it was re-released like maybe for the nds, yes it would be quit a button overhaul to what is currently there, but you could still do it all some how i would expect. Hmm, gives me a wonder why they haven't tackled that but they've tackled super mario 64. Maybe they will, and make some alternatives for other game stations....they would all work for this game and it's other sequels from the 64 and all that. I think they already did wii, through the shop. But what about ds and maybe some other will buying systems? What do you think?
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