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Millionnaire gives away his fortune as it made him miserable





deanhills
An Austrian millionnaire decided to liquidate most of his assets and give it away to charities as he felt that the riches had been making him miserable! I can't imagine how riches could make people unhappy, can you? I'd rather have fun with the riches, and be involved in fun charity projects, or projects for motivating people to reach their dreams. There has to be some satisfaction in developing projects for helping self-achievers. Or to start environmental programmes or save animals, such as someone did in the United States (Arkansas) for saving elephants. Looks as though his philosophy is along the lines of one has to suffer in order to enjoy money. Can't be a fun philosophy.
Quote:
"My idea is to have nothing left. Absolutely nothing," he told The Daily Telegraph. "Money is counterproductive – it prevents happiness to come."

Instead, he will move out of his luxury Alpine retreat into a small wooden hut in the mountains or a simple bedsit in Innsbruck.

His entire proceeds are going to charities he set up in Central and Latin America, but he will not even take a salary from these.

"For a long time I believed that more wealth and luxury automatically meant more happiness," he said. "I come from a very poor family where the rules were to work more to achieve more material things, and I applied this for many years," said Mr Rabeder.

Source: Telegraph.co.uk
ocalhoun
Good for him... too many people equate possessions with happiness. Possessions are sometimes a requirement for happiness, but they can't intrinsically make you happy.

As this man realized, sometimes they can even get in the way of being happy...
lethaltriad
Good for him, I'm sure its probably closely linked to his spiritual views of life. Money isn't everything but to me a nice balance and level of security and financial freedom is really what my goal is for in life.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
Good for him... too many people equate possessions with happiness. Possessions are sometimes a requirement for happiness, but they can't intrinsically make you happy.
But they can make other people happy. I think there is much more fun in using money actively to participate in projects to make people happy, than passive giving to charities. Almost like he has given his life away, in order to make the money go away, as some sort of symbol of suffering that he had endured while he was accumulating his riches. I'm almost certain he is still going to feel unhappy after everything, perhaps even more unhappy than before.
rafaelplinio
money is not everything... but come on...... is it possible to be rich and unhappy? ...
ocalhoun
rafaelplinio wrote:
is it possible to be rich and unhappy? ...

Very possible.

If you don't have something specific you need to obtain in order to be happy, simply having possessions you don't really want or need to begin with won't make you happy.
desonium
deanhills wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
Good for him... too many people equate possessions with happiness. Possessions are sometimes a requirement for happiness, but they can't intrinsically make you happy.
But they can make other people happy. I think there is much more fun in using money actively to participate in projects to make people happy, than passive giving to charities. Almost like he has given his life away, in order to make the money go away, as some sort of symbol of suffering that he had endured while he was accumulating his riches. I'm almost certain he is still going to feel unhappy after everything, perhaps even more unhappy than before.


I think he feels himself happy now, so I do not agree with you. you can not be unhappy if you made many people happy. That must be a great feeling I suggest Cool
goutha
I read that story and totally agree with that guy.

The idea is to think about the thing that you like most and just don't buy it. This way you'll always be looking to have somthing better and it will give you a great feeling!
Afaceinthematrix
To be honest, I bet you every single one of us would be able to give away half of our possessions and still be honest. Honestly, go through everything you own. And I mean EVERYTHING. Go through your closet. Go through your garage. Go through your attic. Go through every single thing that you own. Then you'll truly see how fortunate most of us are (if you're using a computer with the internet, I usually automatically consider you to be fortunate in comparison to many other people in the world).

I did this recently. I found so many things that I forgot that I had, things that I didn't even know I had, things that I haven't used in years, and things that I will probably never use again. I kept a few things for sentimental reasons and I got rid of many other things. I gave a lot of stuff away because I didn't really want to go through the effort of doing a garage sale.

It's also funny in a way. I went through many things and found stuff that I forgot that I had and so I had purchased a replacement. I had multiple of many tools. I'll buy a tool because I'll need it for a job and then I end up buying the tool again when I need it next time...

So I think this guy is doing a great thing. Money didn't make him happy. And the fact of the matter is that we all have way more than we need or even want.
standready
rafaelplinio wrote:
is it possible to be rich and unhappy? ...

I say "yes"! Money will not buy true love. Is true love not the ultimate happiness? Money probably will buy you so-called friends to help you spend it.
How much money you do really need? I have always lived a simple life. I don't need the "stuffings". I have wondered what I would do if I won millions in the lottery. Like dean suggested, I would find "active" projects to put the money into.
deanhills
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
To be honest, I bet you every single one of us would be able to give away half of our possessions and still be honest. Honestly, go through everything you own. And I mean EVERYTHING. Go through your closet. Go through your garage. Go through your attic. Go through every single thing that you own. Then you'll truly see how fortunate most of us are (if you're using a computer with the internet, I usually automatically consider you to be fortunate in comparison to many other people in the world).

I did this recently. I found so many things that I forgot that I had, things that I didn't even know I had, things that I haven't used in years, and things that I will probably never use again. I kept a few things for sentimental reasons and I got rid of many other things. I gave a lot of stuff away because I didn't really want to go through the effort of doing a garage sale.

This is really true. A few years ago when I moved to the Middle East, I was staying in temporary furnished accommodation for about three months, and I did not miss any of my stuff that was in storage for that amount of time. It was very nice when I unpacked all my books and had my own furniture again, but I probably can easily do without that. I'm planning, when I return to my home base, wherever it is going to be one day, to do as you suggested. I have a wonderful selection of books, but think I will donate it to people/organisations who need them.
Afaceinthematrix wrote:
It's also funny in a way. I went through many things and found stuff that I forgot that I had and so I had purchased a replacement. I had multiple of many tools. I'll buy a tool because I'll need it for a job and then I end up buying the tool again when I need it next time...
Same with me, especially tools, and spares like special light bulbs, double adaptors, extension cables, spare parts for my computer, DVD Drives, etc.

Afaceinthematrix wrote:
So I think this guy is doing a great thing. Money didn't make him happy. And the fact of the matter is that we all have way more than we need or even want.
I just get this feeling this guy's philosophy in making his money was hard work and suffering in order to get rich. Not fun. It could well happen that once he has ditched all his riches, that he would find that he is still not that happy. He may feel the need to suffer more and do something different.
carlospro7
Unwisely used money can make you unhappy. I bet if you have good uses for your money, instead of just investing it all on yourself and material, that it can have positive effects. I think you can have money and be happy, but I don't think money itself would be the reason. If you have money and you are happy, there are probably other things that make that true. Like maybe you have a healthy family, healthy relationships, you help your community, you make a difference, etc.
Bluedoll
Thanks for sharing the news clip Deanhills. It actually brightened up my day because it gave confirmation to the worth of the mighty dollar. I agree there is a certain responsibility with money and it can mean power to do something ill or can be used to help to do some good. Giving it away though was his choice and maybe it did raise a few eyebrows to a common truth.

“For a long time I believed that more wealth and luxury automatically meant more happiness,” said Mr. Rabeder.

Well obviously he was wrong. Money can bring you choices and open up new doors of opportunity but happiness no, rich people aren’t necessarily happy.

“It is better to give than to receive,” said Miss Bluedoll.

Now that works for happiness!

Very Happy [/quote]
paskifire
This proves the saying "money can't buy happiness".
speeDemon
it's simple. you are affected by the way you live.. if you've always been a poor person, then living in a 5 star hotel, swimming in grand swimming pools, eating continental food, all these seem to be great things.for a rich person, all this seems to be boring, especially if he was born in a rich family... many people would love to give off their assets and live in a small hut beside a beach....
ocalhoun
speeDemon wrote:
it's simple. you are affected by the way you live.. if you've always been a poor person, then living in a 5 star hotel, swimming in grand swimming pools, eating continental food, all these seem to be great things.for a rich person, all this seems to be boring, especially if he was born in a rich family... many people would love to give off their assets and live in a small hut beside a beach....

The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence, eh?

But if I remember correctly, this guy wasn't born into a particularly rich family, and actually worked hard to build his fortune.
missdixy
I'm with the OP on this one -- just because you have money doesn't mean you have to be miserable. I would have found it a much more enriching experience to start a charity or contribute to one or start up scholarships or some sort of social program, something, while still being able to live comfortable, pay my bills, afford utilities, etc. I would never expect money to buy happiness, but it would definitely be nice to have enough money to really invest in the things you think are worthwhile, and also to be able to put off working (or rather, change jobs) in order to focus one's energy and time on something that one enjoys doing more. Unless of course, you love your job.
jabce85
Some people just aren't cut out to have money..... it doesn't drive all people insane..... i think.... i'm definitely not speaking from experience though
deanhills
Bluedoll wrote:
Well obviously he was wrong. Money can bring you choices and open up new doors of opportunity but happiness no, rich people aren’t necessarily happy.
Totally agreed, but poor people by the same token aren't necessarily happy either. With this guy I just get the feeling that he won't be happy either way. The little happiness he had was a public statement of getting rid of all his wealth because it had made him miserable. That happiness may well have evaporated by the next day when, instead of feeling relieved, he started to worry about something else that makes him miserable, and how to get rid of it, maybe his wife? Or maybe his neighbour?
Bluedoll
This is amazing! So sad am I when I do not do my research before posting but happy to actually have read the article that was provided with this topic.

Reading about this guy in this forum only is like listening to people gossip without going to the source to actually find out what is real. My mistake. Not intending to be critical about anything here, just acting a little sarcastic to say again the old clique is true - don’t judge a book by its cover. (I got an entirely different perspective about this guy when I read the article I meant - very cool topic) Smile
_________________________________________________________

In the end, it was his money, so what he did with it was his business. After reading about Karl and actually seeing his picture it is also obvious to me that this guy is not miserable but very happy with his choices! He is simply on a different journey.

Way to go Karl!

But he said he did not judge those who chose to keep their wealth. "I do not have the right to give any other person advice. I was just listening to the voice of my heart and soul." quoted from Henry’s article.
TurtleShell
I know that wealth and material possessions are not the key to happiness, but as someone who struggles every day just to make ends meet, I believe if my life were financially secure that I would be happier for it. There are so many, many things I would do for myself and my kid and my partner, if only I had the means to do it. We would buy a house. I would have a garage where I could set up a wood shop, to make shelves and furniture for my house. I would hire someone to clean so I could spend more time relaxing and planning good meals and baking and painting and working in a garden. We would travel more, and I would learn another language. I could set goals for myself that weren't need-driven. Instead of my new year's resolution to find a new job and pay off my credit cards, I would make resolutions to improve myself. I could visit museums without worry about the cost...I could spend more time learning about other cultures and reading the news, instead of filling every moment of my life either working or cleaning or figuring out how I'm going to pay my bills.

If I were obscenely wealthy, I could do even more. I could set up charities and organizations that help neighborhoods in need. I could donate money to causes that need it. I could donate money to the arts and sciences. Why does money so often just corrupt lives and warp personalities? Does it have to be that way?

I feel like wealthy people just don't have much excuse to be miserable. I can applaud that this man gave up all his wealth--he had a problem and he did a very brave thing to fix it. Still, why couldn't he just be happy to do good with the means that God had given him? I feel like this is inexcusable.
Xanify
I dunno, I feel like money and happiness are two completely different things. Being rich won't necessarily make you happy, but neither will being poor. You get happiness from the other things in life - hanging out with friends and family, travelling, eating good food, making people smile, posting on Frihost... Wink

But this guy is still a nutcase. I'd rather be rich and unhappy than poor and unhappy.
Arty
It may be that money can't buy happiness, but how can you gain happiness by having nothing?
deanhills
Xanify wrote:
I dunno, I feel like money and happiness are two completely different things. Being rich won't necessarily make you happy, but neither will being poor. You get happiness from the other things in life - hanging out with friends and family, travelling, eating good food, making people smile, posting on Frihost... Wink
Agreed, and well said! It's all of the moment. It's not the money that makes happy or unhappy, but the person who has the money.
Bluedoll
Xanify wrote:
. . . this guy is still a nutcase . . .


The article said his millions not billions by the way, which is I think the latter is what is needed in the 21century to be filthy rich, and that 3 million dollars or should I say 3 million funny squiggles in assets no less is a lot of wealth to hang on to but it is not 3 billion.

Part of his wealth was a 1.2 million dollar estate and gliders/luxury car etc. Mr. Rabeder worked a business to get his stuff and decided to give it away, help poor people in Latin America and move to a more comfortable home.

He said he was unhappy (not miserable says the article) with his present status as his wealth placed him around people he found shallow and decided to do something about it. As long as he continues to feel good about his decisions and goes on to live a happy productive life with less stuff, I see nothing wrong with doing what he did except maybe that it got him into the media.
furtasacra
Xanify wrote:
I dunno, I feel like money and happiness are two completely different things. Being rich won't necessarily make you happy, but neither will being poor. You get happiness from the other things in life - hanging out with friends and family, travelling, eating good food, making people smile, posting on Frihost... Wink

But this guy is still a nutcase. I'd rather be rich and unhappy than poor and unhappy.


No kidding. I'm poor and unhappy, but being poor is the cause of my unhappiness. I've had to temporarily move in with a friend because my utilities got turned off; my house needs repairs; and I wouldn't even be able to eat if I wasn't getting food stamps.

In addition to the stressful lack of necessities, I'm frustrated by not having money to do things that make me happy, like sculpting, gardening, going to concerts or plays, and throwing dinner parties.

Lordy, I need a job, so I can have my artsy fartsy little life back.
ocalhoun
Arty wrote:
It may be that money can't buy happiness, but how can you gain happiness by having nothing?

Read Thoreau's Walden. Then you should understand that.
RubySlasher
Thankfully though, money can buy you seclusion and privacy from lots of nosy people.

Now that's happiness.
ocalhoun
Here's a new way to look at it, which may help some of those who don't understand.

Think of it as a drug addict throwing away all his stash and going to rehab.
You can't cure yourself of the addiction if you keep the stash under your bed, just in case you get cravings.
apple
money would not bring me happiness but it would buy back some of my time and thus give me time to do what would make me happy.
Shadowninja7194
i get wanting to get rid of alot of ur money but like all of it? no way, not for all that hard work u had to go through to become what u are today.
apple
Shadowninja7194 wrote:
i get wanting to get rid of alot of ur money but like all of it? no way, not for all that hard work u had to go through to become what u are today.


I suppose if having all the money you want and no happiness then one reconsiders. There are those who can live without happiness and those who will give up and do anything just to have happiness.
Maybe he realized that the man he had become is not the man his parents molded him to be?
Shadowninja7194
Ya, man i guess i didnt think of that, but still. At least keep a lil bit of ur money =/
apple
Shadowninja7194 wrote:
Ya, man i guess i didnt think of that, but still. At least keep a lil bit of ur money =/


LOL

Laughing
greeneyedtaxi
i agree with the person who said that being poor was the cause of his unhappiness. the same applies to me.

it's not so much as not having what i want - clothes, food, technology - but my family has really been going through tough times. i have four siblings, 3 who are still children, and seeing that they don't really have what they want (they're still kids after all) can make me sad. in the very least, i wish that they we have enough money just so that my siblings can go to school without any tuition problems, and also that we have lots of food. that will make me happy.
achowles
A certain amount of income will ensure you don't have any money problems and make life easier. But if you own too much then you're controlling it only as much as it's controlling you. What defines 'too much' depends on the person. Clearly some billionaires are very happy with their fortunes indeed.

Unfortunately it doesn't seem like he ever found a happy balance and went from one extreme to another, then back again. He blamed money, but it was more down to his inability to handle it.
greeneyedtaxi
i think this money thing seems like buddhism to me.

you're not satisfied with having much, you're not satisfied with having none. it's about the middle way - just having enough.
Bluedoll
achowles wrote:
A certain amount of income will ensure you don't have any money problems and make life easier. But if you own too much then you're controlling it only as much as it's controlling you. What defines 'too much' depends on the person. Clearly some billionaires are very happy with their fortunes indeed.

Unfortunately it doesn't seem like he ever found a happy balance and went from one extreme to another, then back again. He blamed money, but it was more down to his inability to handle it.
Maybe you wrong, maybe he could handle it, just didn't want to anymore and made a life choice. On the other hand perhaps you are right and that was his prediciment. The only thing that I think about is he didn't meet me. I could have handled his money for him. Making someone happy is a whole other ball game though. I agree with that.
deanhills
Bluedoll wrote:
I could have handled his money for him.
Now there's a thought. One could probably trade on that by circulating an advertisement: "Is your money making you unhappy? I can manage it for you according to what would make you the most happy to relieve yourself of it." Smile
crimson_aria
this reminds me of what my friend told me, "more money, more problems" hehe. true, money can't buy happiness, but one can't deny that you need money to do and have the things that make you happy XD I guess it's just a matter of how much money you have, lol.
goutha
crimson_aria wrote:
this reminds me of what my friend told me, "more money, more problems" hehe. true, money can't buy happiness, but one can't deny that you need money to do and have the things that make you happy XD I guess it's just a matter of how much money you have, lol.


Alot alot alot of money is not good. But, only alot of it will help bringing appiness I think!
Ghost900
I don't think that having money will create happyness. Having some money is fine so you don't have to worry about making ends meet, yet you don't have so much money that you are worried about your stocks failing or somebody robbing you.

If I was a millionaire I wouldn't get rid of it all, I would just put it in the bank and live a moderate life rather then get rid of it all. Smile
driftingfe3s
I'd definitely be happy with a few million. I'm pretty sure he just made some bad choices as a millionaire which lead to him becoming unhappy and blamed the money for his problems.

The way I see it, the only thing that can affect your happiness is yourself. You could see all the good stuff life has to offer not let the bad bother you regardless of how much money you have or don't have.
Fire Boar
Bluedoll wrote:
Xanify wrote:
. . . this guy is still a nutcase . . .


The article said his millions not billions by the way, which is I think the latter is what is needed in the 21century to be filthy rich, and that 3 million dollars or should I say 3 million funny squiggles in assets no less is a lot of wealth to hang on to but it is not 3 billion.


Actually the article quoted 3 million pounds, which is equivalent to about 5 million dollars last time I checked the exchange rate.

It's okay to have money, but being a slave to it is not okay, and having a lot of money makes it difficult not to cross the line. This guy realized what was happening and decided "screw it, I don't want this". A comfortable life is not a fulfilling life: as humans we were meant to strive, and gain satisfaction from the little things far more than from the big things.

Here's an interesting thought. If you were filthy rich, when Christmas rolls around, what would you buy your friends and relatives? (And I don't want some clever dick coming in with "I don't celebrate Christmas so nothing".) I for one think it would be a LOT harder to think of presents, since the margin between insulting and overwhelming is that much narrower.
deanhills
Fire Boar wrote:
This guy realized what was happening and decided "screw it, I don't want this". A comfortable life is not a fulfilling life: as humans we were meant to strive, and gain satisfaction from the little things far more than from the big things.
I'm not so sure that is completely true. He still has a comfortable life, as he has not given up all of his money. I'm almost certain though that he has regretted giving his money away, because maybe he did it because he thought that by giving the money away, it would make him happy. By now he would have discovered that it is not the presence or absence of money that makes you happy or unhappy, but your own attitude in how you look at it. People who are wealthy can use their money to make other people happy for example, not by necessarily giving it away, but for example creating Foundations and setting it up so that it will make even more money than before. Obviously this millionnaire has a gift for making money, he just did not find a way in which he could look at it as a gift for making him and others around him happy. Instead, he looked at it as a curse.
Bluedoll
Fire Boar wrote:
Bluedoll wrote:
Xanify wrote:
. . . this guy is still a nutcase . . .


The article said his millions not billions by the way, which is I think the latter is what is needed in the 21century to be filthy rich, and that 3 million dollars or should I say 3 million funny squiggles in assets no less is a lot of wealth to hang on to but it is not 3 billion.


Actually the article quoted 3 million pounds, which is equivalent to about 5 million dollars last time I checked the exchange rate.

It's okay to have money, but being a slave to it is not okay, and having a lot of money makes it difficult not to cross the line. This guy realized what was happening and decided "screw it, I don't want this". A comfortable life is not a fulfilling life: as humans we were meant to strive, and gain satisfaction from the little things far more than from the big things.

Here's an interesting thought. If you were filthy rich, when Christmas rolls around, what would you buy your friends and relatives? (And I don't want some clever dick coming in with "I don't celebrate Christmas so nothing".) I for one think it would be a LOT harder to think of presents, since the margin between insulting and overwhelming is that much narrower.
I understand your point about life with money in your pocket might touch your heart more as you do have the resources to make a difference. What you give at Christmas time might give you more to think about but in my way of thinking that is not the only thing Christmas should be about but I can see someone having those thoughts.
Do you know this person? If not how do you know what they thought except by what the article told you?
goutha
driftingfe3s wrote:
I'm pretty sure he just made some bad choices as a millionaire which lead to him becoming unhappy and blamed the money for his problems.



I'm not Ok with you. Sometimes you want to make goog things even if you feel happy. You'll just feel happier...
apple
deanhills wrote:
Bluedoll wrote:
I could have handled his money for him.
Now there's a thought. One could probably trade on that by circulating an advertisement: "Is your money making you unhappy? I can manage it for you according to what would make you the most happy to relieve yourself of it." Smile


good plan. we should really do an advertisement like that Twisted Evil
Shadowninja7194
Agreed..like a huge addvratizment..Put it on a blimp to:D
deanhills
I don't think it is really that farfetched, although I thought it was quite humorous. If this guy is miserable with having too much money, there could be other millionaires who feel the same way. Someone resourceful could do an advertising pitch to see if he could relieve people like him of their misery. Community Service. Bottomline apply the money to make people happy Smile
soljarag
deanhills wrote:
Bluedoll wrote:
Well obviously he was wrong. Money can bring you choices and open up new doors of opportunity but happiness no, rich people aren’t necessarily happy.
Totally agreed, but poor people by the same token aren't necessarily happy either. With this guy I just get the feeling that he won't be happy either way. The little happiness he had was a public statement of getting rid of all his wealth because it had made him miserable. That happiness may well have evaporated by the next day when, instead of feeling relieved, he started to worry about something else that makes him miserable, and how to get rid of it, maybe his wife? Or maybe his neighbour?


Exactly! I don't think because he gave away his money he will be instantly happy... Money just exposes ones true charactor. If they have choices to buy anything they want and they already have issues, it will make it worse, yes..... However it will not fix the issues they still have.
Bikerman
The research is pretty clear on this.
Yes, money does bring happiness, but until someone can define happiness in a way that all accept then that is not very useful as a statement.
A better way of putting it would be that a certain amount of money decreases major unhappiness.
If you want to see unhappy people then visit a couple who are in financial difficulties (shoudn't be hard, I'll bet most people know friends or acquaintences who are really struggling at the moment). Watch the stress pull them apart, and the fear and trapped feeling that increasing debt brings....it is a major downer.

Money itself simply gives you the ability to avoid situations which will almost certainly make you unhappy, and allows you to put yourself in situations that are more likely to make to happy. The money itself isn't the thing...
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/16/business/16leonhardt.html?_r=2&scp=1&sq=happiness&st=nyt&oref=slogin

Interestingly enough, recent work has pointed out that money can bring happiness because it allows you to give - quite relevant to this story. It isn't being poor that will make him happy, it is the chance to give money to large numbers of people - that DOES make people happy.
http://ezinearticles.com/?Does-Money-Buy-Happiness?-New-Research-Says-Maybe&id=2211492
digitalhaze
deanhills wrote:
I don't think it is really that farfetched, although I thought it was quite humorous. If this guy is miserable with having too much money, there could be other millionaires who feel the same way. Someone resourceful could do an advertising pitch to see if he could relieve people like him of their misery. Community Service. Bottomline apply the money to make people happy Smile


Gotta love community service Razz Yeah, that's possible too, although in this day and age, acts like that are rare.
iman
It's good to know that there are still some people like him.
BigGeek
apple wrote:
money would not bring me happiness but it would buy back some of my time and thus give me time to do what would make me happy.


This is so true, I have always said that if I make a lot of money in life, I would probably be a lot happier, not because of the money, but because of the freedom to do the things that make me happy, and allow me to have the money to spend on the projects that interest me, I love to do, and could help the world. Hell I'd help fund alternative energy research, alternative fuels, alternative power systems.

My home and items in my life would remain relatively unchanged, I don't need a lot of processions, actually they kind of bog you down, so I agree with his attitude in some respects, but having the potential to contribute to charities, and alternative projects that can advance new technologies, I would think that would be much better than living in a hut.


From the Matrix Agent Smith "It's purpose, purpose that binds us, purpose that defines us, purpose that drives us, for without purpose we are lost"

Just teasing, but it sure would be nice to have a purpose in life other than living paycheck to paycheck! Cool
Aredon
paskifire wrote:
This proves the saying "money can't buy happiness".

Nope but you can sure rent it! Very Happy

In all seriousness I'd have to say that having enough money to live comfortably should be just fine for everyone. This need to seek out more wealth is the very thing that's counterproductive.
deanhills
Aredon wrote:
This need to seek out more wealth is the very thing that's counterproductive.
Maybe that is in the eye of the beholder? You do find people who are born with the Midas touch, and who already start to make money when they are kids, perfectly enjoying the planning and the doing. The art of making money can be a gift as well. I don't think however that the millionnaire of this thread falls into that category. He felt guilty making it all his life. I like those millionnaires who enjoy making their millions, but also enjoy spending it. Like Will Smith for example. He is obviously living life to its fullest and enjoying his millions as well. Funny how contagious his enjoyment is however.
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