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ANkorwat





yagnyavalkya
The biggest temple and it was not voted as the 7 wonders because of the sheer population in India
To imagine that the temple was buried in the tropical forest for years itself is hard to believe
rogue_skydragon
I would LOVE to visit Angkor Wat someday
yagnyavalkya
Me too
Lady Elensar
I think Angkor Wat is really great to see. National Geographic Magazine once had a really nice (Dutch) article written about it. And not a tiny one, but with a whole map with text and images about the huge barays, for instance. I found it really interesting and I am sure I will travel to Angkor sometime.

To read one online see: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/07/angkor/stone-text


Angkor
deanhills
Awesome photo, and very interesting article. Thanks for both Lady Elensar. I thought this paragraph had the most meaning for me:
Quote:
The Khmer Empire was not the first civilization felled by climate catastrophe. Centuries earlier, as Angkor was rising, halfway around the world a similar loss of environmental equilibrium was hammering the Maya city-states in Mexico and Central America. Many scholars now believe that the Maya succumbed to overpopulation and environmental degradation following a series of three punishing droughts in the ninth century. "Essentially, the same thing happened to Angkor," says Coe, who in the 1950s was the first to discern similarities between the Khmer and Maya civilizations.

Modern societies may need to brace for similar climatic challenges. According to Buckley, the most likely trigger of the Angkor megadroughts was intense and persistent El Niño warming of the surface waters of the central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Scientists debate whether human-caused climate change will lead to more pronounced El Niños, but the Vietnamese tree rings show that even natural oscillations in the Pacific can spark catastrophe.

Interesting that the article is looking at environmental degradation and drought as the cause of the falling of Angkor. The building however still looks very strong, so at the height of the Empire it must have been quite impressive. Must be an architectual and engineering marvel. Wonder how they built it, carrying all the building materials up layer on layer until the top. With very little damage to the environment, compared with today.
rogue_skydragon
It truly is a spectacular structure with enduring and iconic cultural impact. I definitely want to visit this temple one day and learn more about it first-hand. The first time I saw it was in the film "Mortal Kombat: Annihilation," haha
supernova1987a
yagnyavalkya wrote:
The biggest temple and it was not voted as the 7 wonders because of the sheer population in India
To imagine that the temple was buried in the tropical forest for years itself is hard to believe


Not voted because of what?
I think they just want to supress the real facts. They only talk about middle east and egypt. Taj Mahal is okay for them but they never talk about Angkor Wat. The cosmology in it is wonderful.
yagnyavalkya
supernova1987a wrote:
yagnyavalkya wrote:
The biggest temple and it was not voted as the 7 wonders because of the sheer population in India
To imagine that the temple was buried in the tropical forest for years itself is hard to believe


Not voted because of what?
I think they just want to supress the real facts. They only talk about middle east and egypt. Taj Mahal is okay for them but they never talk about Angkor Wat. The cosmology in it is wonderful.

Actually most may not even know that there the world largest Hindu temple elsewhere
I saw a programme in TV that was very good and explained the history of the temple and also about pol pots atrocities
It is really a wonderful temple
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