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Can Processors be added over one?





anasash
Is it possible to add one more processor to an existing one?
Is it by adding ports to connect it or by connecting it to any existing ports or by any other methods?
ocalhoun
The simple answer... And I think you need a simple answer... Is 'no'.
william
If you're hardware wasn't designed for it, no, you can't. Of course, if you are running Linux and want to have a powerful computing setup, you can always cluster multiple systems together.
anasash
but does clustering multiple processors together make both of them active, or only the latest one works?
And even if both are active does that boost processing speed????
AftershockVibe
anasash wrote:
but does clustering multiple processors together make both of them active, or only the latest one works?
And even if both are active does that boost processing speed????


Clustering is, broadly speaking, where you connect a number of computers together over a network in order distribute a very intensive task. It's for entire machines, not processors. This is how server farms work or, in a more processor-specific example, high quality 3D rendering for films.

Ocalhoun is right that the basic answer is no. The closest thing on modern commercial hardware is where you have two, three or four core processors which use the same type of connector to the motherboard. You could then replace a dual core with a quad core if you so wished.

The reason why you can't do what you suggest is due to the complexity and speed of modern processors. They are so quick that the timing to send signals down wires even that tiny has to be incredibly precise. Unless you have specifically produced a design to offload a specific task (like the GPU on the graphics card). if you throw in a massive wire to connect another general purpose processor, they won't be able to communicate fast enough to do anything worthwhile.
anasash
well , thank you aftershock. that was really helpful. One more thing , if i wanted to do the same in the way you had mentioned , how much would that cost me????
PureReborn
sure its possible. but your motherboard has to be designed for it (like the others said)

one of the more common consumer choice is to get a dual CPU motherboard. Intel Xeon processors offer are chosen since they're server grade CPUs.

some examples here: http://www.directron.com/dual.html
note that this is very expensive though.
ocalhoun
anasash wrote:
One more thing , if i wanted to do the same in the way you had mentioned , how much would that cost me????

Clustering, you mean? Or replacing a dual core with a quad core?

Replacing a dual core with a quad core will cost you just the cost of the CPU, probably $200 to $400.
You can only do that if your motherboard is compatible with both though. If you don't make sure that it is compatible in advance, you'll waste the money you spend on the new CPU. Supposing you are able to do this, sell the old CPU on eBay, to make up some of the cost for the new one.

As for clustering, that can cost anything. A simple set-up that isn't very powerful or useful can be done for free if you already have two networked computers handy... Or you can easily spend $100,000 or more on a supercomputer-class cluster. And there are infinite variations in between those two extremes.
AftershockVibe
PureReborn wrote:
sure its possible. but your motherboard has to be designed for it (like the others said)

one of the more common consumer choice is to get a dual CPU motherboard. Intel Xeon processors offer are chosen since they're server grade CPUs.

some examples here: http://www.directron.com/dual.html
note that this is very expensive though.


Ah, I'd always assumed that they required both processors to be installed as that's the only configuration I had ever seen. As expected, there's a gotcha... and not just the cost!
I ran across this:
ExpertSexChange wrote:
Yes, it is certainly possible and not at all uncommon. Most modern motherboards like this one automatically detect how many CPUs and operate accordingly.

One thing to note, however, is that if you decide to go to dual CPUs in the future, you may need to replace the one you are getting now. It's vital that both CPUs in a dual setup be from the exact chip revision. Since you can't specify what revision you want when you buy them, you get whatever is available. When you buy a matched pair, you are guaranteed to get a match.

It's not an issue now but will likely be when you upgrade.

So, in your case you're no better off than just replacing the CPU with one with more cores as I suggested earlier. Cool
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