FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Windows applications not running





Sparda
Hello,

Does anyone else seem to have a problem with Windows applications? Ever since I started using Windows XP I have noticed that some applications would just 'stop running' when prompted to start. For example if I were to double click on an '.exe' file to start the program.. the only thing that happens is the mouse cursor changes for 0.3 seconds and that is all. The default Loading for the cursor is shown. I now have Windows 7 on a completely different computer and I am beginning to notice this problem again. This usually only happens with small applications. Reinstalling the program fixing the problem temporarily, but whenever I start Windows again the program no longer works. I once again I must reinstall. So I was wondering if anybody else experiences this problem or is it just my luck? Confused
ThePolemistis
Sparda wrote:
Hello,

Does anyone else seem to have a problem with Windows applications? Ever since I started using Windows XP I have noticed that some applications would just 'stop running' when prompted to start. For example if I were to double click on an '.exe' file to start the program.. the only thing that happens is the mouse cursor changes for 0.3 seconds and that is all. The default Loading for the cursor is shown. I now have Windows 7 on a completely different computer and I am beginning to notice this problem again. This usually only happens with small applications. Reinstalling the program fixing the problem temporarily, but whenever I start Windows again the program no longer works. I once again I must reinstall. So I was wondering if anybody else experiences this problem or is it just my luck? Confused


Can you name the small applications in particular?
It could be a virus perhaps? You installed a virus scanner?
Sparda
ThePolemistis wrote:


Can you name the small applications in particular?
It could be a virus perhaps? You installed a virus scanner?


Here's a few:

Hamachi [Downloaded from the LogMeIn website]
Both Torrent programs BitTorrent and Utorrent [Downloaded from their main websites]

Also, a program I made myself has stopped working. It is just a simple email form application I developed with Microsoft Visual Basic. No, I do not have a virus scanner. If this is a virus, I must say that this is a strange one. My processes seem normal. Nothing out of the ordinary.
Diablosblizz
Install a antivirus, Comodo for say, and run a scan. You should always run an antivirus no matter how "computer-smart" you are.
Fire Boar
Diablosblizz wrote:
Install a antivirus, Comodo for say, and run a scan. You should always run an antivirus no matter how "computer-smart" you are.


Not true, that's just the "official" statement. In truth, it's far better to simply know the insecurities of the operating system and take precautions accordingly. For example, when using Windows, use Firefox with the NoScript extension installed and the new Microsoft-supplied extension (the one that basically introduces a huge security flaw that before was confined to Internet Explorer before someone had the bright idea of modifying the Firefox install process by providing this extension via Windows Update) disabled, and selectively enable Javascript for only a few trusted websites. 99% of websites are perfectly functional without. Viruses can only install themselves if they have an avenue for attack, and this method basically causes the browser to safely render pages without doing anything extra by default. So if you do end up at an unsavoury site, no problem.

And if you slip up and end up getting a virus, just reinstall the operating system. Windows needs reinstalling every 6 months ideally anyway, otherwise it slows down horribly in a way that only gets worse with time.
Sparda
Fire Boar wrote:
Diablosblizz wrote:
Install a antivirus, Comodo for say, and run a scan. You should always run an antivirus no matter how "computer-smart" you are.


Not true, that's just the "official" statement. In truth, it's far better to simply know the insecurities of the operating system and take precautions accordingly. For example, when using Windows, use Firefox with the NoScript extension installed and the new Microsoft-supplied extension (the one that basically introduces a huge security flaw that before was confined to Internet Explorer before someone had the bright idea of modifying the Firefox install process by providing this extension via Windows Update) disabled, and selectively enable Javascript for only a few trusted websites. 99% of websites are perfectly functional without. Viruses can only install themselves if they have an avenue for attack, and this method basically causes the browser to safely render pages without doing anything extra by default. So if you do end up at an unsavoury site, no problem.

And if you slip up and end up getting a virus, just reinstall the operating system. Windows needs reinstalling every 6 months ideally anyway, otherwise it slows down horribly in a way that only gets worse with time.


You say Windows needs to be reinstalled every 6 months anyways, yet I have never heard of that before. I do realize Windows slows down as the time passes, but I just assumed I either needed to defrag the hard drive or remove un-needed software from my computer. I do use Firefox. I wouldn't dare use Internet Explorer Shocked I guess this little problem I have is just included in the 'Features' of the Windows OS. I noticed this on three of my own computers, and others' computers that are local to me.
Fire Boar
Yes, reinstalling or restoring an image: the latter is a bit more complicated to set up initially but it means that you can get the drivers and configuration sorted, then take an image, then simply restore that image, without having to hunt down all the drivers and essential software.

It's definitely worth doing if you're going to be using Windows: the time saved by not having anti-virus software and goodness knows what other services and having a clean hard disk (defragging does help here a little, but it's not perfect) more than makes up for the once every 6-12 months service. I'd also recommend keeping your data either on a different partition or external storage (or both) so that backing up doesn't become an issue: you can reinstall while keeping your data where it is. Just be aware of programs that store data (mostly oldish games) in the "Program Files" folder, if you need to keep the files generated by them (like save files).

Run a one-time scan every now and again if you like on your data, just to be sure. You can do this with virus checking software such as ClamAV, which doesn't attempt to protect Windows from viruses (real time monitoring, email scanning, automatic stuff that clogs up your system resources and slows everything down), but does scan on demand and remove existing viruses if any.


As for your original problem, normally I would suggest starting the program from the terminal to see if you get any useful debugging information, but since this is Windows I highly doubt that will be effective. Still, just for a laugh you could try it: press the key combination Meta+R (the Meta key is the Windows logo on most keyboards) and type "cmd". Then in the prompt type the full path of the program you want to run, using backslashes to separate folders.
welshsteve
Hamachi LogMeIn runs in the systray/notification area, so you won't get a "tab" on the windows taskbar, so it is probably starting up ok, you just haven't noticed it. Of course, another way of checking what is happening is to take a look in the Event Viewer for any application errors. That might give you a clue as to what is happening.
bloodrider
It's a really good idea to not have an antivirus installed!!!
It's users like you that facilitate the Zombify process of computers, easing DDOS, thank you!!!


@Sparda, however you should at least do an online scan.
Fire Boar
bloodrider wrote:
It's a really good idea to not have an antivirus installed!!!
It's users like you that facilitate the Zombify process of computers, easing DDOS, thank you!!!


Uh... right. Believe it or not, I was actually serious. Anyone who is Windows competent should be capable of doing what I described above and managing perfectly well with neither virus nor anti-virus software. Anti-virus software is just a facilitator for laziness and incompetence.
bloodrider
Fire Boar wrote:
Uh... right. Believe it or not, I was actually serious.

That's what worries me Rolling Eyes

Fire Boar wrote:
Anyone who is Windows competent should be capable of doing what I described above and managing perfectly well with neither virus nor anti-virus software.

You don't know who you're giving advices and you suppose he's a "power user"? lol Great procedure Exclamation

Fire Boar wrote:
Anti-virus software is just a facilitator for laziness and incompetence.

Yeah, you're so right, anti-virus software should be abolished Applause



PS: Sorry the offtopic, but i couldn't resist Razz
Fire Boar
bloodrider wrote:
Fire Boar wrote:
Anyone who is Windows competent should be capable of doing what I described above and managing perfectly well with neither virus nor anti-virus software.

You don't know who you're giving advices and you suppose he's a "power user"? lol Great procedure Exclamation


Stop misquoting me. I suppose no such thing. It seems you're so set in your ways that you, among many others, believe that AV software is somehow a necessary part of every Windows computer. That's certainly what Microsoft and its partner organisations Symantec and the rest of the AV vendors want you to believe... but I'm pointing out that actually, if you're sensible and take reasonable precautions, there's no danger.

Think of it this way. I, the hypothetical Windows-user, browse the internet with Firefox, with the AdBlock Plus and NoScript extensions installed. I browse reputable sites, and I will never open a file from the internet unless I know what it is. I know where my install disks are and I have or know someone who has a bootable CD that I can use in case things go pear-shaped. I can recognise fishy (phishy, zombie-origin, chain, etc) emails. I don't use the internet for anything else except the occasional online game. How, as a prospective attacker with no local access to my computer, are you proposing to infect my computer with a virus?
mOrpheuS
Fire Boar wrote:
Think of it this way. I, the hypothetical Windows-user, browse the internet with Firefox, with the AdBlock Plus and NoScript extensions installed. I browse reputable sites, and I will never open a file from the internet unless I know what it is. I know where my install disks are and I have or know someone who has a bootable CD that I can use in case things go pear-shaped. I can recognise fishy (phishy, zombie-origin, chain, etc) emails. I don't use the internet for anything else except the occasional online game. How, as a prospective attacker with no local access to my computer, are you proposing to infect my computer with a virus?

Indeed.

Contrary to popular belief, Windows has no built-in mechanism to automatically download and install viruses every time you connect to the Internet. Shocked

All major computer publications always advocate the use of anti-virus software because they target user Joe.

Infact, the following will not infect your computer, even if you don't run an antivirus -
  • Viewing a malicious website with a browser that denies installing/executing third-party content (or atleast prompts you before it does). This includes all major modern browsers.
  • Extracting/Viewing a compressed archive that contains malware.
  • Downloading content through P2P. etc.



On the other hand, you can get infected despite having one or more anti-virus software installed - if you -
  • 1. Run a vulnerable browser / Click "OK" to each prompt your browser shows you, without reading.
  • 2. Execute an assortment of EXEs that you keep downloading from internet, especially the kind that are accompanied by *.nfo files. Wink
  • 3. Plug in your friends' USB drive and double-click/Autorun, with no hesitation.
  • 4. Generally leave your common sense outside when you work on your computer. etc.
bloodrider
Fire Boar wrote:
Think of it this way. I, the hypothetical Windows-user, browse the internet with Firefox, with the AdBlock Plus and NoScript extensions installed. I browse reputable sites, and I will never open a file from the internet unless I know what it is. I know where my install disks are and I have or know someone who has a bootable CD that I can use in case things go pear-shaped. I can recognise fishy (phishy, zombie-origin, chain, etc) emails. I don't use the internet for anything else except the occasional online game. How, as a prospective attacker with no local access to my computer, are you proposing to infect my computer with a virus?


I'm not set on "it's a requisite to have an AV". The problem is that the "hypothetical Windows-user", the common Windows-user isn't capable of managing himself, you can't imagine how dumb people can be. I've worked on support area and even after you teach them something, after some time they forget it (or in the reality they never understood it... they may be not capable to, I've seen that too) and redo the same mistake. And apologize me to generalize, but the majority of Windows-user is like this, or else the Windows wouldn't have the purpose to exist.
That's my point.

What you say it's true, but you have to know what you're doing.
Fire Boar
Ah, thank you. We're reaching common ground now. That's good. Just one point...

bloodrider wrote:
I've worked on support area


That's probably it. Most people I've worked with wouldn't dream of contacting "support" unless absolutely necessary, so I guess our "typical Windows user" is actually a completely different person.

I believe that, rather than advocating "anti-virus" and letting that act as a "safety cushion", the focus should instead be on educating people on the safe use of the internet, best practises, teaching them to recognise that these threats exist and what to do about them. To be instantly suspicious of anything that they don't know popping up, especially if it tells them that their computer is infected and they must run a scan now (if it wasn't before, it will be after the "scan"). And to know how to recognise email scams. This way, not only is the person overall better protected, but they will feel a lot more confident and in control when using the Internet. Though anti-virus software for Windows can be a useful cushion, I would strongly discourage the myth that it is in any way necessary.
Related topics
Which is better Xbox or PC
My PC is SO Slow!!!
Freezing Windows 98 Second Edition
How do you approach your Desktop?
Any computer technician plz help me!!!
LiteStep! Replace that stupid start button in windows.
Windows XP Tricks & Tips!!!!
Do you think you're going to get vista?
Mysteriously and unpleasantly my pc shuts down..
About installing any program
Windows Vista vs Mac OS X
A sigh of relief.
What soft to replace a complete Windows by a complete Linux?
Running Windows applications on MACs
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Computers -> Operating Systems

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.