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Formatting OS Drive





nivinjoy
Hey friends read and listen carefully..!!

I had brought a Dell Studio laptop with 4.0 GB RAM & 500 GB Hard disk with Windows Vista as the OS.
I had 2 partitions C & D and later i did a partition of E with 100 GB from C drive.

I have Vista in C and yesterday i installed Windows 7 into E [because when i tried for a new installation into C drive it said it is not recommended as the recovery files may exist in C drive]

Now i have Vista in C & Windows 7 in E and at the boot time the selection screen comes for the OS selection.

Now what i want to ask is that How can i remove Windows 7 entirely from the system (because i have decided to do an upgrading into the Vista in C drive)

So will it be safe to do a format of E drive where Windows 7 is installed..??

Somebody said me that if i format the drive also the boot selection screen may exist.. So what is the best way to remove Windows 7 from my system without any traces left behind..??

Please help me out guys..!!
metalfreek
You can format E and remove windows 7 but the startup selection will be there I am sure about that.
Fire Boar
Don't upgrade anything, it's quite likely to fail. Instead you should back up all your data, remove both operating systems, repartition your disk to a scheme to your liking, and load up your new operating system(s) however you want. It's more flexible that way, and its chance of success is extremely high (I've never heard of a failure if you do it this way).
AftershockVibe
Upgrading versions of Windows is known to be more trouble than it's worth. It's much quicker, easier to do a fresh install and is less time consuming in the long run to set up your programs again.

If I were you, I'd put anything important on partition D, merge partitions C and E then format the remaining one (which won't be named but will be the equivalent of your old "C"). Then stick Windows 7 onto that.

D should be safe unless you mess around with the partition or somehow accidentally format it. The data I've got on my desktop has come all the way from a Win 98 computer. Just keeping your files separate (mine are on a different drive, not just partition) makes OS upgrades so much simpler. Similarly, can you imagine the mess my system would be in if I'd upgraded 98 -> ME -> XP -> Vista->W7 ??! It's not worth the hassle - keep it clean Wink
nivinjoy
metalfreek wrote:
You can format E and remove windows 7 but the startup selection will be there I am sure about that.


Hey that's what i asked... How to remove it completely..??
metalfreek
nivinjoy wrote:
metalfreek wrote:
You can format E and remove windows 7 but the startup selection will be there I am sure about that.


Hey that's what i asked... How to remove it completely..??

Well unfortunately I don't know that. I should be there in boot.ini but I couldn't find in Vista. Very Happy
hunnyhiteshseth
Well i would advice againt completely reformatting your computer. I would advice you do the following FROM THE WINDOWS VISTA:-

1) Copy important data from e: to d:
2) Format e: by disk manager
3) Right click my computer --> Properties
4) Go In advanced settings or system properties or something like that
5) Click on Advanced tab. Click on 'Settings' of 'Startup and recovery' portion
6) Click on Edit
7) Delete the line completely which says ".....Windows 7..."
Cool Save and keep on clicking ok.
9) Reboot to confirm removal of Windows 7
nivinjoy
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:
Well i would advice againt completely reformatting your computer. I would advice you do the following FROM THE WINDOWS VISTA:-

1) Copy important data from e: to d:



Wait i have only Windows 7 in my E drive..?? So what do u mean by important data..??

And are you sure will this work..??

Also i would like to ask you guys whether is it good to do the upgrade option from Vista to Windows 7 or do a fresh installation..?? What do you guys recommend..??
hunnyhiteshseth
If you only have windows 7 then you can safely delete it. By important data, I meant anything you might have copied yourself in e:

I would say, from XP its better to do a fresh installation and upgrade from Windows 7



P.S.: Personally i consider Windows 7 what Windows Vista should have been.
nivinjoy
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:


I would say, from XP its better to do a fresh installation and upgrade from Windows 7



P.S.: Personally i consider Windows 7 what Windows Vista should have been.


Sorry..i didn't get you..?? Can you please make it more clear about the upgrade..??
Agent ME
nivinjoy wrote:
Sorry..i didn't get you..?? Can you please make it more clear about the upgrade..??

He's saying don't upgrade the windows install. He's suggesting you wipe it and install Windows 7 on a clean drive.

I'd recommend this too, not only for system stability reasons, but also because it makes you need to go through your personal files and decide what you want to keep for the new install.
hunnyhiteshseth
Sorry it was a typo on my part.

What I meant was that if you have Windows XP, then instead of going for upgrade installation go for 'fresh installation', i.e. have a dual-OS in your computer.

But it is better to do upgrade installation from Windows Vista.

Cleaning the whole drive doesn't figure in picture at all.. Laughing
nivinjoy
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:
Sorry it was a typo on my part.

What I meant was that if you have Windows XP, then instead of going for upgrade installation go for 'fresh installation', i.e. have a dual-OS in your computer.

But it is better to do upgrade installation from Windows Vista.

Cleaning the whole drive doesn't figure in picture at all.. Laughing


What i meant to ask is that will the upgrading give the full performance or will it me minimized because of the flaws in Vista..??
hunnyhiteshseth
nivinjoy wrote:
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:
Sorry it was a typo on my part.

What I meant was that if you have Windows XP, then instead of going for upgrade installation go for 'fresh installation', i.e. have a dual-OS in your computer.

But it is better to do upgrade installation from Windows Vista.

Cleaning the whole drive doesn't figure in picture at all.. Laughing


What i meant to ask is that will the upgrading give the full performance or will it me minimized because of the flaws in Vista..??


If you upgrade from Vista, you can be assured of full performance.
Fire Boar
Upgrading will leave behind some things that should definitely not be there. This could slow up your computer, but there's a much more important reason not to just upgrade.

If you upgrade, it will start off fragmented which is REALLY bad. Much worse than fragmenting gradually over time because the core operating system files which never change are suddenly scattered about your hard disk. This means that the mechanical parts have to work an awful lot harder to get all the data: I'll let this diagram explain.


Code:
Okay:
|||||||||||||||                                     |      |
^

Bad:
||| |           |       ||        |  ||   |      |     |||||
^


Key:
|: Operating system files required at boot
^: HDD head


See how much the head has to jump around to get at the files it needs in the second situation? The first situation is common on a new install: most of the essential files are clumped together which means that during booting up the head only has to move within that region. There may well be other files necessary which are or which have parts that are away from this clump, but far fewer than the result of an upgrade (which is quite likely to result in something like the second diagram).
hunnyhiteshseth
Fire Boar wrote:
Upgrading will leave behind some things that should definitely not be there. This could slow up your computer, but there's a much more important reason not to just upgrade.

If you upgrade, it will start off fragmented which is REALLY bad. Much worse than fragmenting gradually over time because the core operating system files which never change are suddenly scattered about your hard disk. This means that the mechanical parts have to work an awful lot harder to get all the data: I'll let this diagram explain.


Code:
Okay:
|||||||||||||||                                     |      |
^

Bad:
||| |           |       ||        |  ||   |      |     |||||
^


Key:
|: Operating system files required at boot
^: HDD head


See how much the head has to jump around to get at the files it needs in the second situation? The first situation is common on a new install: most of the essential files are clumped together which means that during booting up the head only has to move within that region. There may well be other files necessary which are or which have parts that are away from this clump, but far fewer than the result of an upgrade (which is quite likely to result in something like the second diagram).


The small amount of files upgradation will leave will hardly matters for performance. The benefit of avoiding all the hassle of setting up all the softwares & user accounts again is worth it.

About the fragmentation issue, a simple defragmentation after upgrade installation will restore the performance loss due to fragmentation. Also, in long run all the drives become fragmented whatever installation you may use. So, fragmentation as an issue is not applicable for deciding what type of installation to perform.
Fire Boar
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:
About the fragmentation issue, a simple defragmentation after upgrade installation will restore the performance loss due to fragmentation. Also, in long run all the drives become fragmented whatever installation you may use. So, fragmentation as an issue is not applicable for deciding what type of installation to perform.


Not quite. I'm not talking about fragmentation, but clumping (not a technical term I know). This is about the only good thing about storing files sequentially, that is, on creation looking for the first available contiguous region of big enough size. It's about physical storage of different but related files. The files may well get fragmented, but whether they do or not, they will not all exist together on disk after an upgrade, so the mechanical parts have to work harder to load operating system files (which typically are all loaded together).

This is, incidentally, the downside of an anti-fragmenting approach to storage.
hunnyhiteshseth
Fire Boar wrote:
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:
About the fragmentation issue, a simple defragmentation after upgrade installation will restore the performance loss due to fragmentation. Also, in long run all the drives become fragmented whatever installation you may use. So, fragmentation as an issue is not applicable for deciding what type of installation to perform.


Not quite. I'm not talking about fragmentation, but clumping (not a technical term I know). This is about the only good thing about storing files sequentially, that is, on creation looking for the first available contiguous region of big enough size. It's about physical storage of different but related files. The files may well get fragmented, but whether they do or not, they will not all exist together on disk after an upgrade, so the mechanical parts have to work harder to load operating system files (which typically are all loaded together).

This is, incidentally, the downside of an anti-fragmenting approach to storage.


Hmm, thats true. I didn't thought about it. But doesn't windows automatically re arranges files according to access order? Anyway, I know of some free defragmenters, like Defraggler, which rearrange files according to their access frequency in the starting of drive offering dual advantage of grouping frequently accessed files (Obviously, Windows files are most accessed files) and positioning them in start of drive (which is considered the fastest).
Fire Boar
hunnyhiteshseth wrote:
But doesn't windows automatically re arranges files according to access order?


No. Anyway, isn't this going a little overboard? A fresh install is always better than an upgrade anyway, no matter how many bits of software you install to try and make the upgrade a more viable option.
soljarag
I just got win7 and I was going to just do the upgrade, but decided just ti format it all and start clean. I am very glad i did
anasash
nivin!
wat is advised is to completely format E: and then boot the windows 7 cd to make a repair of the boot-up. this removes the selection screen of the windows. i've done the same thing when i came accross the same problem and it worked.........
nivinjoy
BIG PROBLEM

Hey friends it has turned to be a great disaster now..!!

I had got upgrade cd from Dell last week and i upgraded the Vista in C drive to windows 7 and then formatted the E drive as it was not necessary to have two windows 7 and was working in the freshly installed windows 7.After some time the system got shut down and rebooted itself

But now it gets to the boot screen and gets stuck itself and launches the start up repair screen and finally the laptop is not working at all..!!

What should i do in such a situation..!! Please someone advise me as this is something serious..!!
Fire Boar
So... you ignored the advice given in this thread. Now you're paying the price. Sorry if this post sounds a little irate but... well, I and others did warn you.

Do it properly this time. Failure to boot is a corrupted operating system file somewhere, so boot up with alternative media like for instance Knoppix (you will need to burn a CD with the ISO first... it's important to make sure you burn the image, not the file). If you have or know someone who has an Ubuntu live CD around anywhere, you can use that instead. It doesn't really matter, the only thing this does for you is create an environment where you can rescue your files. Whatever alt media you use, you will probably need to change your BIOS settings to attempt to boot up from a CD before attempting to boot up from the hard disk.

Okay, booting up from the live CD will get you into an operating system quite different to Windows, but that looks similar. This is running directly from the CD so don't worry if it's a bit slow. Knoppix is generally pretty fast as far as live CDs go, which is why I suggested it. Anyway, using this you should be able to browse to a folder that represents your C: drive. And D: and E:. This is usually on the desktop labelled something like sda1 (with other partitions being sda2, sda3). Look, there are all your Windows files! Okay, plug in some external storage. A USB flash drive perhaps, or an external hard disk. A new icon should appear, probably labelled sdb1. See a pattern here? The first disk is sda, the second disk is sdb, and so on. The numbers indicate which partition you're on.

Use this environment to back up anything important. Shut down when you've finished. Now install the operating system from scratch, like you should have done last time.
nivinjoy
Thanks for the reply..!!

By the way one of my friend was telling about something called Super Grub..!! Will that help or which is the best method..??
Fire Boar
Sounds like a stand-alone boot loader. It will only work if your MBR was corrupted. But you're still sitting on a bodged upgrade which is going to be a lot less efficient. Stop looking for work-arounds and do it properly. Smile
nivinjoy
Fire Boar wrote:
So... you ignored the advice given in this thread. Now you're paying the price. Sorry if this post sounds a little irate but... well, I and others did warn you.

Do it properly this time. Failure to boot is a corrupted operating system file somewhere, so boot up with alternative media like for instance Knoppix (you will need to burn a CD with the ISO first... it's important to make sure you burn the image, not the file). If you have or know someone who has an Ubuntu live CD around anywhere, you can use that instead. It doesn't really matter, the only thing this does for you is create an environment where you can rescue your files. Whatever alt media you use, you will probably need to change your BIOS settings to attempt to boot up from a CD before attempting to boot up from the hard disk.

Okay, booting up from the live CD will get you into an operating system quite different to Windows, but that looks similar. This is running directly from the CD so don't worry if it's a bit slow. Knoppix is generally pretty fast as far as live CDs go, which is why I suggested it. Anyway, using this you should be able to browse to a folder that represents your C: drive. And D: and E:. This is usually on the desktop labelled something like sda1 (with other partitions being sda2, sda3). Look, there are all your Windows files! Okay, plug in some external storage. A USB flash drive perhaps, or an external hard disk. A new icon should appear, probably labelled sdb1. See a pattern here? The first disk is sda, the second disk is sdb, and so on. The numbers indicate which partition you're on.

Use this environment to back up anything important. Shut down when you've finished. Now install the operating system from scratch, like you should have done last time.



Ok now i am going to do like you said..!! But can you please tell me the way to do this..!!

And you said to install the operating system from scratch..!! To install the OS when i boot from a cd it doesn't show any drives..!! Then how will i do the installation..??

For me backuping is not important as there is no much important files as the system is new..!!

I had tried with a XP cd and a vista installation cd.. But it didn't get to work..So in this situation what should i do..??

Please guide me..!!
Fire Boar
Eh? I thought you wanted to install Windows 7. Sure you want to keep plodding on with XP or (*shudder*) Vista?

Windows 7 is the first version to include a proper partitioner. If you really don't want to keep anything on that machine, I suggest you just blast away all existing partitions with that handy dandy delete button when you get to the partitioning step. Then click on the unallocated space, click "New" and make it as big as you like. You could make more than one partition if you want to.
nivinjoy
But for installing it fresh it is not showing any drives or as you said to delete the drives nothing is being shown..!!
Agent ME
Which install disc isn't showing any drives? The XP, Vista, or W7 install disc? What discs do you have?
nivinjoy
Agent ME wrote:
Which install disc isn't showing any drives? The XP, Vista, or W7 install disc? What discs do you have?


The best thing is none of the installation disks are showing any drives..!! I have all these disks..!!
Bondings
I guess you should try it with one of the Linux cd's/dvd's mentioned above, like Knoppix. They will most likely recognize the drives and you should be able to format your drive and hopefully make it usable for Windows 7.
nivinjoy
Bondings wrote:
I guess you should try it with one of the Linux cd's/dvd's mentioned above, like Knoppix. They will most likely recognize the drives and you should be able to format your drive and hopefully make it usable for Windows 7.


I had 2 OS.. I had formatted one drive and so will this KNOPPIX thing help as the windows installation cd's are not showing any drives to install..!!

This had been a long time... That is from December 22 i am having this problem..So please help me to solve this as soon as possible..!! I need to start working as many of my projects are pending..!!
nivinjoy
STATUS AS OF NOW

Yesterday i downloaded the Knoppix and booted the DVD..Then an interface came and it is showing only desktop and the cd drive..No drives are listed..!! What should i do..!!


Actually yesterday i had called the Dell Tech Support and one of the idiot [sorry for the harsh language,he was worst] from there told me to debug the system and he told me to type the things that he told me and it went on like

Code:
 A:\RAX and so and so...!!

Some binary things too..!!

Till i do this the system was atleast coming to the boot screen and getting stuck. But now when i on the system it is showing

Quote:
Broadcom failure.Check cable

No operating system installed


And Knoppix also doesn't help..!! What should i do now..?? Please help me because you guys are the only hope for me now as i don't find the Dell Tech support worth..!!
Fire Boar
Sounds like your hard disk has been unplugged. Open up the case and give the cables a wiggle, see if there's one loose coming from the hard disk.
Bondings
Fire Boar wrote:
Sounds like your hard disk has been unplugged. Open up the case and give the cables a wiggle, see if there's one loose coming from the hard disk.

I think the best thing for loose cables is to unplug and then plug them back in. Sometimes it seems connected ok and only unplugging and replugging helps.
nivinjoy
But doing that myself will get me into more problem as they will cancel my guarantee..!! I am thinking of sending it to Dell Workspace..!!

Even though their response is poor i am going to send it..!!
ssweat
whenever i format my os for me or a customer i back up all their important data move it to for you drive e: (favorites, pics, documents, etc.)then just boot with windows 7 disk and format the c: drive and install windows 7 dont upgrade it. Then after install just move all you back up files back to c: drive and then format e: The system files you are worried about losing in c: are really unneccessary in my opinion, and most of the times just clutter and slow your computer, Windows 7 has system restore so really no need for system recovery software to be installed anyhow
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