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Argentina passes dictatorial media law





Da Rossa
Quote:


BUENOS AIRES, Argentina – Argentina's Senate overwhelmingly approved a law that will transform the nation's media landscape on Saturday, and President Cristina Fernandez quickly signed it into law.

Senators voted by a surprisingly high 44-24 margin for the law, celebrating the end of dictatorship-era rules that enabled a few companies to dominate Argentine media. Opponents say it instead gives the government too much power and will curtail freedom of speech.

The new law preserves two-thirds of the radio and TV spectrum for noncommercial stations, and requires channels to use more Argentine content. It also forces Grupo Clarin, the country's leading media company, to sell off many of its properties.

"The initiative is moderate and democratic," said Sen. Miguel Angel Pichetto, a ruling party leader, during nearly 20 hours of uninterrupted debate that ended Saturday morning. "It allows for companies to have an adequate position, but not a dominant one."

Opponents say the new law simply replaces a media oligopoly with a state monopoly — and will enable investors with close ties to the president and her husband, former president Nestor Kirchner, to snap up media properties at low prices in forced sales.

Outside Congress, thousands of supporters celebrated in the plaza with chants, applause, fireworks and booming drums. The demonstration was organized by government supporters and included political activist Maximo Kirchner, son of the first couple.

Ruling party Sen. Liliana Fellner said the law does away with a vestige of Argentina's 1976-83 military dictatorship.

"We are settling an old debt with democracy," she said.

The commission applying new regulations and granting (or canceling) radio and television licenses will have seven members, include two designated by the executive branch, three by Congress and two by a federal body representing provincial governments. This should ensure ruling party control, which opponents fear will be used to threaten and censure critics.

Most affected is Grupo Clarin, one of Latin America's leading media companies. Within one year, it must sell off radio stations, television channels and part of its dominant cable TV network to comply with new ownership limits.

"The government is going after the media with all its remaining power," Clarin Editor Ricardo Roa wrote Saturday. "It has rushed through a misleading law that seems to be progressive but in reality only sets us back: it will promote a press that is weaker and more docile."

The lopsided Senate vote makes it unlikely the law will be overturned when Fernandez loses supporters in a new Congress, starting Dec. 10. A two-thirds majority in needed to overcome her veto.

The new law imposes more frequent licensing approvals, and requires that at least 70 percent of radio content and 60 percent of television content be produced in Argentina. It also requires cable TV companies to carry channels operated by universities, unions, indigenous groups and other non-governmental organizations.

Clarin and other media companies will now go to the courts, saying the new limits violate constitutional property protections. Cabinet Chief Anibel Fernandez said Saturday that "this is the right of any citizen."

__

Associated Press Writer Vicente Panetta contributed to this report.



Source: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20091010/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/lt_argentina_media_law

What do you think guys? This has no precedent, even in the Latin American dictatorial regimes in the 20th century. They used to play fair and cut all at once, and you knew what it was. Now Cristina-Socialist-Kirchner brings up this new concept of censorship: limiting the right of media companies to broadcast the news to more than around 30% of the country's territory. Fantastic!!
deanhills
Da Rossa wrote:
What do you think guys? This has no precedent, even in the Latin American dictatorial regimes in the 20th century. They used to play fair and cut all at once, and you knew what it was. Now Cristina-Socialist-Kirchner brings up this new concept of censorship: limiting the right of media companies to broadcast the news to more than around 30% of the country's territory. Fantastic!!
Sounds troubling to me Da Rossa. Once they start with this, who knows where it may end. Maybe the next step will be "missing persons" again?

This is not your country is it, you're from Brazil? What is the situation like in Brazil in comparison with Argentina?
Da Rossa
In Brazil things are a little different, no irony. In here it will be more difficult to pass something like this, but maybe it won't be necessary. The government in here has apparently bought the executives and the major journalists of the main channel, Globo. Not sure though.

What Lula (our president, who I'm no proud saying that) and Kirchner have in common is not only the fact that they're both socialists, but they're members of a Latin America sorority called "Foro de São Paulo". Members are the left-trended political leaderships of the continent, excluding US and Canada only. So the socialist parties and other organisations such as the FARC are members, and they decide, in that group, what measures to take in the continent to face the "US imperialism" and plant the communism in here.

Creeps me out.
deanhills
Da Rossa wrote:
In Brazil things are a little different, no irony. In here it will be more difficult to pass something like this, but maybe it won't be necessary. The government in here has apparently bought the executives and the major journalists of the main channel, Globo. Not sure though.
Well at least one can say Brazil is a little more subtle. Would be scary to me however. I still can't believe how the world could have allowed people in Argentina responsible for the "missing persons" during the eighties, get away for it as long as they have. Sometimes I do not understand the existence of all these international philanthropic type organizations, and atrocities like these still happen anyway.
Da Rossa
Quote:
Well at least one can say Brazil is a little more subtle. Would be scary to me however. I still can't believe how the world could have allowed people in Argentina responsible for the "missing persons" during the eighties, get away for it as long as they have. Sometimes I do not understand the existence of all these international philanthropic type organizations, and atrocities like these still happen anyway.
They're not filantropic unfortunately... they are veiled criminals, and I'm not exaggerating. In here, we see many "organisationz" fighting for "the rights of the indigenous people" so they can seal some portions of lands and prevent them from being used by agriculture and produce food for us. Actually, they're socialists and left-oriented (which, in Brazil, is not equivalent to "liberal") that fight those "diabolic capitalists that own the land". Very logical.

Other organisationz say they protect the indians in the north of our country (read Amazônia), but actually they force the government to create more and more "CU's" (conservation units, a portion of land in which no one can "devastate" or "explore", ironically "cu" in portuguese is... (get a dictionary Razz)) so that no one will ever put a foot on that area and then the zone is free for others to explore the gemstones from the region. Most of them are belgians, french, german and japanese.

Quote:
Well at least one can say Brazil is a little more subtle.


That's even worse! People think it's everything alright!
deanhills
Da Rossa wrote:
Other organisationz say they protect the indians in the north of our country (read Amazônia), but actually they force the government to create more and more "CU's" (conservation units, a portion of land in which no one can "devastate" or "explore", ironically "cu" in portuguese is... (get a dictionary Razz)) so that no one will ever put a foot on that area and then the zone is free for others to explore the gemstones from the region. Most of them are belgians, french, german and japanese.
Sounds fraudulent. I can imagine there must be many wealthy "land owners" growing out of the misfortune of the Indians. Not to mention real damage to the environment, by those who say they are doing what they are doing to protect it.
Da Rossa
Quote:
Sounds fraudulent. I can imagine there must be many wealthy "land owners" growing out of the misfortune of the Indians. Not to mention real damage to the environment, by those who say they are doing what they are doing to protect it.


There are, and I don't question that. But what is the big deal? Some say some properties are so large that can cover multiple indian tribes. The indians, until some years ago, didn't even know legally where they were (inside someone's land). And that was good, because there would be no conflict, and the farmers didn't exactly have an agenda of indians extermination either.

But do not make confusion, the caracters are: the government, the land owners, the organizationz and the indians.

The land owners and the government are currently in opposite sides, ideologically. The indians are supported (officially) by the orgs. The governent supports the orgs by handing them money. Orgz, of course, see the land owners as enemies and polluters.

But do you really think that the orgz' agendas are protecting the indians? They actually don't give a @%#$$#@. The problem is that they employ good, well-intentioned people, that think they're really working for a noble cause. The orgz are explorers themselves. They get free pass to the CU's. To do what? Not to take pictures, I guess Smile
Da Rossa
Oops. I see that we diverted from the topic Razz
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