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Windows vs. Linux






Which one do you use/like better?
Linux
56%
 56%  [ 17 ]
Windows
43%
 43%  [ 13 ]
Total Votes : 30

guth75
Just a poll that I thought would be interesting poll.
carlospro7
I like them both for different reasons, but one thing you are forgetting to mention is that Windows refers to a certain operating system, and linux refers to several distributions. I use windows xp and ubuntu, but more and more, ubuntu is becoming my main operating system.
Da Rossa
Windows!! I don't know how to use Linux. Simple as that.
Also, Microsoft has done a great job until now to make the use of the OS simple. We, ordinary people, don't have time to go under the hood of a system. We want something satisfactory to be used. Linux, I admit, is better when you can set it up, so, like some people say, you computer it is gonna be "really yours".

But what about so many incompatibilities? That's the bad part.
aningbo
i use linux in class. sucks.

windows rule. linux guys says windows sucks but why?

linux is a total copy of linux with some few changes here and there to make life easier for programmers but not for regular users.
Fire Boar
aningbo wrote:
linux is a total copy of linux with some few changes here and there to make life easier for programmers but not for regular users.


That... is...

... wow. Okay. Linux is a copy of Linux? No way, seriously?

I assume you mean "Linux is a total copy of Windows...", which is totally incorrect at about every level possible. Everything is totally different, from the kernel through the filesystem and executable format right up to the windowing system and desktop. Yes, life is HUGELY much easier for programmers, but the experience is also different for the regular end-user. For better or worse, well, that's up to the individual, but in my experience "better" is usually the case once they realise that no, this is not Windows, and they shouldn't expect it to be the same as what they might be used to.

Anyway, this topic seems a little... familiar. Hasn't this been done before somewhere?
Diablosblizz
Quote:
Anyway, this topic seems a little... familiar. Hasn't this been done before somewhere?


How about pretty much every topic? Smile
harismushtaq
Most linux distributions use common kernel and some of them use package distribution with others. Linux had been difficult to use as with my experiance with Red Hat 7. I recently installed Ubuntu 8.10 and I agree that they have worked hard to make it easy going. It is easy to connect to itnernet, work with files, play media, connect to friends, play games and do development. I think it is competitive and as open source software flourishes, it will find more users. Windows is installed on more than 90% of the worlds computers, it is still easier to learn, it is every where and it will take a long time to die, if it does.
Arseniy
Just two years ago I'd say that I'm in love with Microsoft Windows '98 Very Happy
But now, as I've got my new netbook, I fell in a very romantic relationship with Ubuntu... Gosh... It's soooooo goddamit wonderful!!!!!!
Works as clock, really useful and suitable for me.
fladry
I love windows XP. It works fast and fine for me. It is easy to use. I haven't tried vista or windows 7. I have not even tried any version of linux. Windows is good for me.
b4r4t
fladry wrote:
I love windows XP.


And I love my girl Wink But ... if You prefeer windows ... Wink

And seriously:
Linux is OK if You need fast, free OS ... internet, communication, movies, text editor, Web Server, webdev etc.
But ... if I have to use Photoshop or Solidworks then I have to use Windows (well ... Photoshop works on MAC too).

None of those OSes sucks ... and Linux Live CD is gr8 thing if You have to save Your pc when Your Windows crashes ... again Wink

I'm using Vista x64 (laptop) and Win 7 x64RTM (PC) right now and both are OK ... but I'll never come back to XP ... it's to old Smile
Fatality
I have used both and am being honest when I say I like them both. I used Win XP for the longest time, skipping Vista completely I have been using Win7 since build 7000 was released for public use.
I really like Win7 and recently attended the Microsoft Launch Event for its release. I will be loading the retail version into my gaming desktop as soon as I have the time to.

On the other side, I have used both Ubuntu and Fedora distributions of Linux and have become familiar with both. I like using Linux and would use it exclusively if I knew I could run everything I need on it. With the increasing support Wine has become a valid option for running most Windows applications that would normally not run on Linux.

I know this wasn't in the options, but I thought I might add it. I am considering getting a Mac for my next laptop purchase.
Mihkel
I like both for some reasons. Windows for UI and easier to user for people. Linux is more powerful in many categories. It is safe and so on. I have dual-boot and I voted for Windows.
tdossi
I think, it always depends on the desired purpose. I have at the moment also Windows. Unfortunately, there are many programmes only for Windows. Also for many geräte there are still no Linux driver.
gandalfthegrey
People who like Windows have never used or never even tried to use Linux. Don't slam it if you haven't tried it.
Flarkis
definitely linux is a better choice for me. When it comes to power and customization, linux wins hands down. But window is still easier to use from a users perspective most of the time. I do some software development and i can say i hate coding for windows. The fact that it isint POSIX makes me quite annoyed. And the shear lack of organization regarding file structure layout also doesn't help.

It all comes down to what type of user you are, if u don't want to know anything about a computer and just want t have it work, windows is better. If you need to control what is happening with you computer, linux is better. Although the lack of true hardcore gaming on linux has prevented a large number of people from switching despite the fact they would do better on linux.
ProfessorY91
Interesting discussion, one thats been had over and over and over and over again.

Linux is free, windows is not. More often than not, and IF you're using the right distribution of Linux, its going to be faster than Windows. Its not going to look pretty unless you have a fairly decent setup on your computer...

Linux is harder to set up. Linux gurus, don't argue with me - it is a lot harder to understand and use the terminal than it is to go through the bloated wizards bundled in windows. You have a trade off, and things don't always work.

Linux is still free. Razz

As you become more familiar with computers, you tend to gravitate towards doing things faster and using less system resources. This is Linux's goal. The goal of windows is easy to use and compatibility, at the compromise of using more system resources and doing things slower.

Y.
Fire Boar
ProfessorY91 wrote:
Linux is harder to set up. Linux gurus, don't argue with me - it is a lot harder to understand and use the terminal than it is to go through the bloated wizards bundled in windows. You have a trade off, and things don't always work.


That entirely depends on what distribution you're using. Remember, Windows is preinstalled on most computers so "setting up" isn't an issue at all. If you've ever had to install Windows on anything from scratch, as you do with all flavours of Linux, you will know exactly what I mean when I say "driver hell".
ProfessorY91
Fire Boar wrote:
ProfessorY91 wrote:
Linux is harder to set up. Linux gurus, don't argue with me - it is a lot harder to understand and use the terminal than it is to go through the bloated wizards bundled in windows. You have a trade off, and things don't always work.


That entirely depends on what distribution you're using. Remember, Windows is preinstalled on most computers so "setting up" isn't an issue at all. If you've ever had to install Windows on anything from scratch, as you do with all flavours of Linux, you will know exactly what I mean when I say "driver hell".


Of course windows is preinstalled on most computers. All operating systems slow down over time, I have my drives partitioned so that XP is the only thing on one partition - when I reinstall periodically, only XP is erased... Its also a lot easier to find drivers for Windows than it is for any Linux distribution; most motherboards come with an install disk anyways. Failing that, Device Manager gives you the name of your device, google will give you the windows driver for it. Very simple.

Linux is hit or miss every single time - using third party drivers is hell, rebuilding nVIDIA drivers is also hell, hashing my sound card is hell, setting up dual displays involves editing the xorg, running software requires wine, installing wine means fixing direct draw. Its always going to be a tradeoff; Windows wins with compatibility and ease of use, Linux with resource management.

For the sake of sanity, lets assume we're using Ubuntu, DSL, or Puppy... or some GUI capable distribution. Its guaranteed that you'll run into at least three problems in which you'll need to open up a terminal and edit a config file. So yeah, setting up is easier on Windows, where I can run my install disk, or download my driver executables.

I'd rather not have to deal with extracting tarballs into the right folders and running scripts in a shell.
Fire Boar
ProfessorY91 wrote:
Its also a lot easier to find drivers for Windows than it is for any Linux distribution;


That's the thing though, 99% of the time there's no need to look for drivers at all: most hardware is fully supported in the kernel. The only things I've ever come across that weren't already working with Ubuntu are: The graphics card, which was using the 2D FS nv driver by default and the nvidia-provided version was installed and activated in just two clicks. And an obscure wireless card on one of my friend's computers, that needed ndiswrapper to work. Most of the time, everything works so looking for "drivers" is a complete waste of time: you already have them.

ProfessorY91 wrote:
Setting up dual displays involves editing the xorg, running software requires wine, installing wine means fixing direct draw.


Dual displays is easy to set up with disper, though I'll agree, dual monitor support is not anything like as straightforward as in Windows.

"Running software requires wine." That's... quite ridiculous. I don't use wine... does that mean that I don't run software? No, I do everything anyone else uses a computer for, and more since I'm also a developer. If you mean "running Windows software on Linux requires wine"... well, fair enough. Running Linux software on Windows requires a compatibility layer as well. Stands to reason. Both Windows and Linux users have vast libraries of software to choose from. Windows software just tends to be a lot more expensive than the almost always free Linux equivalents.

"Installing wine means fixing direct draw." Does it? In every scenario I have come across, to run Windows software one simply installs Wine from the repositories and then launches the executable. No hacking needed. A rare issue like this should not be labelled as something that happens all the time, that's just misleading.
albuferque
On Windows, you were probably used to find a given program on the Internet, download a setup.exe file, and then install the program in something like C:\Program Files.

Things are very different on GNU/Linux.

On most main distributions, finding, downloading, installing and uninstalling applications is done with one single add/remove program.

Within Synaptic, for example, a wealth of useful, free and open source software has been listed, sorted and described for you. You need only select/deselect the programs you wish to install/uninstall, and apply your changes. The download and set-up will be done automatically.

You do not have to worry about where the program is installed. You do no have to worry about viruses, malware or “demo” programs (the application list has been constructed and checked carefully by your distribution’s programmers).

This aspect of GNU/Linux is probably the most satisfying and enjoyable to newcomers. Don’t be afraid to try new things out and enjoy your time!

Whichever operation you are doing on your GNU/Linux computer, it can be done by typing code.

Therefore, when you ask for advice, advanced users might reply with a series of coded commands for you to type in your computer, rather than long explanations on “where to click”. This method is called the command-line and code is entered through a small program called a terminal. You do not need to know how to type code for a normal use.

On Windows, the main computer user is allowed to run any program and change any system parameter. In the Linux world, however, things are different.

A normal user is allowed to perform normal actions, such as moving/writing files, launch normal applications, etc.

Only the root user, however, is able to modify system configuration, update the system, and install programs. This restriction makes sure that any malicious program inadvertently run by a normal user, because it hasn’t got root privileges, may not cause much harm.

When you attempt to do something only the root user can do, you will be prompted for the root password. Therefore, you should have a password set for the root user, even if it’s very simple: this will prevent yourself from inadvertently damaging your system.

Whenever your computer prompts you for a password, be wary and make sure you know what you are doing.

When using the command-line, getting root user privileges is done by typing sudo before the command (it means: super-user do and you will be prompted for a password). If you are asked to type a command starting with sudo and you are not sure what it means, ask in a forum.

Also, no defragmenting is needed, you may be used to regularly defragment your hard drive under Windows. Under GNU/Linux, however, the file systems in use are extremely resistant to fragmentation so that this is completely unnecessary.

Because GNU/Linux is secure(by default), running an anti-virus is not necessary either (unless you deal with Windows files under an emulator(Wine), or pass them on to Windows users). Be careful when you go root, and keep your system up-to-date with the automatic security updates: you’ll stay safe.

And finally there is a great support community (IRC and forums), and the web is full of good places to guide you.
tdossi
Though security programmes under Windows are inalienable, however, pursue to a large part also eyewash: Virus scanners and Firewalls try to draw the attention by symbols or announcement windows to themselves, so that the user feels well protected. Unfortunately a pest can also deactivate the virus scanner or the Firewall or change if he has come once to the system. Finally, a user with administrator's rights has complete freedom - also them to infect the computer.

Under Linux a virus scanner is superfluous in the absence of viruses. Though there is also virus scanner for Linux, but these serve only to examine files or mail for Windows viruses.

Also "Personal Firewall" is superfluous at the desktop company of Linux. A staff Firewall has two duties under Windows:

* She blocks accesses from the Internet for services which run for some reasons on the calculator. The Ubuntu-standard installation offers on the Internet only no services, so there is also nothing what one would have to block. On the contrary: Also a Firewall is only one piece of software and can contain itself security gaps. The better if one can renounce them.
* She blocks undesirable accesses to the Internet for programmes which one has installed intentionally or accidentally (viruses, Trojans) on his computer. For example, the printer drivers which announce consumption data to the manufacturer, media player which her manufacturers about own music predilections clear up or hidden spy programmes.

Under the software which can be installed about the Linux springs (which every range of application covers, but under circumstances own favorite programme does not contain), there are no such spy programmes. And an "inadvertent" software installation is not possible by the strictly kept security draught. Here there is no need for a Firewall.
metalfreek
I use both OS but I am mostly on my linux machine (ubuntu). I simply like linux because its GREAT OS.
ForceRun
Never really tried linux, grow up on Macs, started gaming and swaped over Windows. Windows 7 is a very smooth running system and works great for gaming, so what more do I need.
tdossi
Most think, one is able to do no play which one under with Linux Windows can play to bring to the running! Fortunately, is not in such a way! The best conditions is to be played around under Linux at the moment a NVidia map. This lies primarily with two factors:

1. Graphics maps NVidias are optimised substantially bessser for Open-GL uses as maps ATIs Radeon

2. NVidia has own developer team for Linux graphics map driver (ATI limps behind here around something)

Now one could mean, DirectX plays are only Windows reserved.... to him is not luckily also in such a way! There is under Linux Windows emulator Wine (Wine is in emulator!) itself very well for all kinds of programmes one is suited under Windows absolutely, however, version exisitiert needs no Linux! From Wine there was a version especially fitted on plays called winex meanwhile cedega is called! Winex was still free, however, cedega stands under the aladdin licence and one must pay for the programme although it has originated from an OpenSource project.
snowboardalliance
Windows Vista is what I mainly use. Just because I like all my Adobe software (Photoshop, Premiere, After Effects...I mean show me a good open source alternative to After Effects). I think there are a few other things I really like Windows for.

Anyway, I would switch to Linux if it could run all of the programs I use like that. I did try dual booting for a while but I rarely want to restart to change OS's. Virtualization is a nice alternative to get my linux fix. Really I love the linux command line more and more as I use ssh more at school. I really think the whole system is really well designed. I've only really used Ubuntu. I also think the way software is installed is way simpler in linux because all of the updates and installs and uninstalls are done in one place. Try keeping all of your windows software up-to-date automatically like that.

I do plan on eventually getting an extra computer just for linux. Maybe as a file server but mostly just to play around with
Fire Boar
Adobe software usually works very well under Wine. You might want to check your version at the Wine application database. Also make sure you get the development version, not the "stable" version, by following the instructions on the Wine website.
kmaliagkas
Linux of curse.

I believe in a few years the Linux would have a very important share of users that will prefer to use it.
nam_siddharth
Windows anytime. Windows has more supported software than linux or any other OS. I will shift to other OS only when they starts supporting windows programs.
tdossi
Look, nevertheless, sometimes under: http://www.winehq.org/

With the tool Wine it is possible to instal Windows programmes on a Linux platform. Besides, Wine works in such a way that imaginary Windows surroundings is created and which are intercepted windows to specific orders and are converted afterwards into Linux orders. The principle in itself funktionert though and one is able to do almost every programme emulieren, unfortunately, the Emulieren is not always quite free from problems. The problems simply lie in the fact that Microsoft keeps secret the source code of the Windows operating systems. Though one could decipher the large part of the source code, nevertheless, there are the orders which are still unknown. If Windows uses these "exotic" orders to programme, one cannot pursue the respective programme at all or only unstable.

Thus do not let themselves, for example, the Microsoft office packages with the customary Wine emulieren. For this one needs crossover office, a special Wine version, but liable for costs. As a rule, however, lets itself virtually every programme with Wine emulieren and the abovementioned disadvantages should not keep from trying out Wine.
Fire Boar
nam_siddharth wrote:
Windows anytime. Windows has more supported software than linux or any other OS. I will shift to other OS only when they starts supporting windows programs.


Windows doesn't run Linux programs well... Linux doesn't run Windows programs well. In fact, besides using Cygwin for shell programs, I don't think you can run any Linux software on Windows at all. So... for me, I guess we could say I will shift to another OS only when it starts supporting Linux programs.

The quantity of software for both operating systems is very substantial, and I've never had a problem that could be solved with a piece of Windows software that couldn't be solved just as well or better with a piece of Linux software. The converse, however, is not true. For example, any kind of programming on Windows is a pain. Also, burning CDs with K3B is much easier and nicer than burning with any other software I've used, on any operating system. And a lot of the really good "no spam" free programs on Windows (known as open source software), such as GIMP, are really ports from Linux, because if someone makes open source software (the best kind), it's usually going to be initially for Linux because it's just so much better suited to open source development.
LostOverThere
Quote:
The quantity of software for both operating systems is very substantial, and I've never had a problem that could be solved with a piece of Windows software that couldn't be solved just as well or better with a piece of Linux software.

I must agree with this statement. In the past few years especially, I've noticed the amount of Linux software has grown substantially. Particularly in the area of video editing; we went from literally no good consumer video editing products a number of years ago to a number of great consumer based editors by means of OpenShot, PiTiVi, and Diva.
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