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Traffic rules





raaeft1
Recently, my driver was taking my family to the market in my car. He took the right turn when the light turned green. However, he had to stop in the middle of the road to give way to a slow-moving cycle-rickshaw which was coming from the wrong side to avert an accident. By the time my driver crossed over, the light turned red and the cops standing there not only verbally abused my driver but also insisted on challaning him. My driver argued with them that it was not his fault as he was following the traffic rules. He further said that the cops should rather have challaned the slow-moving cycle-rickshaw which was coming from the wrong side. But the cops did not listen and demanded ``bribe'' to let the driver go. My wife called me on the cell phone and I had a word with the cop. It was after much persuasion that he let my driver go.
I was shocked a few days later when a friend had a similar unsavory experience at the same traffic lights. The friend investigated and learnt that the cops had deliberately manipulated the traffic light so that it turned green for an unusually short duration of three to five seconds so that innocent people could be threatened with ``challans'', to avoid which eventuality, they normally offered a ``bribe'' to the cops to be let off.
I strongly feel about this. The traffic cops should act morally and dutifully. Their job is to prevent road accidents and not to fiddle with the traffic lights in order to harass people and make ``corrupt money.''
ocalhoun
raaeft1 wrote:

I strongly feel about this. The traffic cops should act morally and dutifully. Their job is to prevent road accidents and not to fiddle with the traffic lights in order to harass people and make ``corrupt money.''

Not familiar with the laws of India, but in many countries, the cops asking for bribes could face jail time, especially if somebody got proof of it. Of course, if the person you report it to is corrupt as well, you'll only cause trouble for yourself. Confused
Afaceinthematrix
Well... That doesn't really surprise me. The police officers of many countries are completely corrupt and will ask for bribes from everyone. Even in the U.S., where bribes will get them arrested, most cops are jerks that don't actually care about protecting the citizens (their job) but just care only about writing tickets to good citizens that will, by accident, go five MPH over the speed limit.
Nick2008
No surprise here either, nowadays money is more important than other people.

People have been killed over a bottle of beer too (which costs ~$2.50).
Fatality
Disturbing, but a shame. I know that in the US there would be serious consequences for the people who deliberately "messed" with the traffic light. Police are suppose to enforce the law to protect people. Some cops forget this when "doing their duty". Some people need to be made an example of, but a law abiding citizen shouldn't have to suffer because he did something to prevent an accident.
deanhills
I sometimes wonder whether the traffic cops could be bored and maybe underpaid. This to them is an acceptable way of topping up their salaries. I would imagine India has to be quite a challenge for traffic cops, one has to be pretty brave to drive there from what I have heard and driving can be pretty chaotic, allowing for abuses like that. The closest I got to that kind of driving was in Sri Lanka, with its very narrow roads, and racing cars, with barely a few inches to spare between them was quite a nerve wracking experience.

I must say I very rarely see traffic cops in Canada, they seem to be almost invisible, except night times, as drinking and driving is a very serious offense in Canada, we often get road blocks for those. But for the rest, I rarely see them. I mostly see our local municipal police who are always mingling in the communities they serve. Without being threatening nor intrusive. Lending a helping hand to keep order, and since they know their communities, are quite good to act only when it is really necessary.
spring567
You are too friendly. If it's me I will have words with him.
ankitdatashn
The moment I read your post and I said....Oh God this must be in our country, and guess I was right. The corrupt people should be hanged.
Ghost900
In the US it would be very hard for a single cop to do much with a traffic light as it is all controlled in another area but if cops were to bribe people here and were reported it would be a big issue for that cop. I am not sure how the India street light system is set up, whether a cop could mess with the light or not but he still would have been wrong to bribe you. Its too bad that we have to have corrupted people that have some control of us such as politicians and police.
Ophois
I really hate driving.
Wait, that's not entirely true. I don't mind driving so much, I just hate traffic. I also hate running the risk of this sort of thing happening, and I don't even live in India. I live in Florida.
This kind of thing is tragic, and sadly, it's not the first time I have heard of such a thing happening in India(among many other places).
Some people have mentioned that it would be a big issue here in the US, if a cop were reported for similar practices. While I agree, I also argue that there is much bribery going unreported and unnoticed, nonetheless. It just happens to be state sanctioned. They call them "tickets" or "citations". You usually get one for a bogus traffic violation.

I will try to keep this as short as I can.

I got my very first ticket recently. I happen to be a good, law abiding driver, and have never had a ticket in all my years of driving. The cop said I rolled through a red light, which was false. It had just turned yellow, and the cop was on a side street. There was also not a single other car on the road, and unfortunately, no traffic camera at that intersection. I argued with the cop for a minute, but if you know how American cops operate, that is a no-no. You either sign the paper and agree to pay the ticket, or risk something worse. Anyway, I was given a $206 ticket for driving through a yellow light, with no traffic around. I could have fought it, but I don't have time for that,(which is what they count on) and in the end it comes down to my word versus his(another thing they count on when they see you don't have a criminal background and no illegal contraband on your person or vehicle). So I suck it up and pay the $206 just like everyone else, for a violation that never occurred.
It's bribery, but it's at the state level. The cop doesn't get the $206(though I'm sure they get some sort of kudos for handing them out). Instead, the city uses the cops to shake down citizens in order to generate revenue for the state coffers. It's exactly like the cops in India fiddling with the light, it's just on a much larger scale, and much more concealed behind the guise of legality.
And people wonder why I prefer to walk.
deanhills
Ophois wrote:
It's bribery, but it's at the state level. The cop doesn't get the $206(though I'm sure they get some sort of kudos for handing them out). Instead, the city uses the cops to shake down citizens in order to generate revenue for the state coffers. It's exactly like the cops in India fiddling with the light, it's just on a much larger scale, and much more concealed behind the guise of legality.
And people wonder why I prefer to walk.
Wow Ophois, this was a genuinely good posting and an excellent point! What a petty cop to give you a ticket for a yellow traffic light. And yes, that has to be some form of bribery in a different way. I would have accepted the ticket, but I would have gone to the local traffic authority to contest it. What would his evidence have been as clearly it was his word against yours? He can't prove you went through the intersection when it was red and there was no one around to testify on his behalf. Do you also work on a demerit system? As that would have been the reason I would have taken it further.
Ophois
deanhills wrote:
Wow Ophois, this was a genuinely good posting and an excellent point!
Thanks, I do try.
Quote:
What a petty cop to give you a ticket for a yellow traffic light. And yes, that has to be some form of bribery in a different way.
The cop was wrong to do this, but I can't help thinking that there must be some sort of motivation coming from his superiors. Otherwise, this would not be nearly as common as it is. After all, a warning would have been fine. A citation creates more work on his part, but it creates revenue for the county/city and earns points for his department.
Quote:
I would have accepted the ticket, but I would have gone to the local traffic authority to contest it. What would his evidence have been as clearly it was his word against yours? He can't prove you went through the intersection when it was red and there was no one around to testify on his behalf. Do you also work on a demerit system? As that would have been the reason I would have taken it further.
He had no evidence for his case, and I had none for mine. Even the on-board camera in his cruiser wasn't in a position to have seen the light when I went through it. As I said, his word against mine. Which translates to the traffic court siding with the cop, as he is entrusted with the authority to make these judgments. I would love to have gone to court, had I any evidence, but taking time off work to fight a $206 citation would have cost me at least that much anyway. He had a partner(fellow cop) to testify on his behalf, and I had a passenger who had a few alcoholic drinks, so my witness was no good. In fact, it was my friends car, I was taking him home because I didn't want him driving after having a few drinks(good thing too, he would have gone to jail).
So there really isn't much I could do about it but bend over and take it.
deanhills
Ophois wrote:
I would love to have gone to court, had I any evidence, but taking time off work to fight a $206 citation would have cost me at least that much anyway. He had a partner(fellow cop) to testify on his behalf, and I had a passenger who had a few alcoholic drinks, so my witness was no good. In fact, it was my friends car, I was taking him home because I didn't want him driving after having a few drinks(good thing too, he would have gone to jail).
So there really isn't much I could do about it but bend over and take it.
I would have probably done the same thing in that case. Sometimes it is just not worth the fight. My experience is probably also coloured as years ago I was working for the Public Prosecutor's office. The Assistant Public Prosecutor's work was to see all these guys who were upset about their tickets, and he used to excuse all of them. I thought that was quite unfair, as it was not publicly known that the Prosecutor's Office would be the total opposite in terms of degrees of leniency to the traffic cops. But that was some years ago. If I had to travel a very far distance "in traffic Smile " then I may also just pay the fine instead, unless the country I am in has a demerit system, as there are countries who would demerit your driving license for any offences, including parking tickets.
standready
Not much of a surprise. Cops are power hungry and "greed is good" Twisted Evil
Ophois
standready wrote:
Not much of a surprise. Cops are power hungry and "greed is good"
I don't really like blanket judgments, but your statement proves to be true so many times it's hard to deny. I have known a lot of cops, and from what I've seen, they generally get into the field as 'idealists'. They want to change the world, save lives, and all that good story-book stuff. Sadly, a few years working the streets leaves most of them jaded and cynical about people. Most times, rightfully so. It just makes it difficult to be on the receiving end of their "service" when you know you are clean, but they still view you through those 'suspect' glasses.
deanhills
Ophois wrote:
standready wrote:
Not much of a surprise. Cops are power hungry and "greed is good"
I don't really like blanket judgments, but your statement proves to be true so many times it's hard to deny. I have known a lot of cops, and from what I've seen, they generally get into the field as 'idealists'. They want to change the world, save lives, and all that good story-book stuff. Sadly, a few years working the streets leaves most of them jaded and cynical about people. Most times, rightfully so. It just makes it difficult to be on the receiving end of their "service" when you know you are clean, but they still view you through those 'suspect' glasses.
I agree with this too. Also that there are "Casper" and "Spooky" versions. I remember a "Casper" version a million of years ago in South Africa. A real character. He was a millionaire though, and did special training as a traffic cop in his later years so that he could direct traffic during peak traffic hours around 5:00 to 6:00 p.m., in a very congested area of Johannesburg which had always irked him and where a traffic cop had always been needed. He was completely dedicated and devoted to that task, and certainly posed a very dignified presence. Smile
missdixy
Sounds a little like Mexico, at least in the whole cops-trying-to-get-bribes part. I'm not sure where this happened but I'm sorry. Policemen are there to protect us and to reinforce rules, not to try to trick us and intimidate us.
airh3ad
Here in the philippines aroad users’ manual has been produced by the Traffic Education and Information Division, containing vital traffic rules and egulations, fines and penalties for traffic infractions, alternate routes and the processes involved in filing complaints this is great rigth?
for better traffic they organize traffic Academy was organized early in the year to professionalize our traffic officers here in the country and to enhance their capabilities in the field of traffic and transportation management. Around 500 1000 new breed of traffic officers have undergone training and are now deployed at the major thoroughfares. The Academy also provides trainings and seminars for traffic officers from various law enforcement agencies who are interested in enhancing their capabilities. so don encounter big traffic jam here in our place.
deanhills
airh3ad wrote:
so don encounter big traffic jam here in our place.
How about police traffic officers who are ticketing just for the sake of it? Have you or someone you know been in a situation like that, i.e. encountering dishonest traffic police in the Philippines?
Dean_The_Great
Hey, does anyone know if there are any major differences between the rules of the road in Canada/US and Australia. I'm taking a trip to Australia soon and I want to know if there's anything I should be aware of (other than the left hand side of the road driving, obviously).
carlospro7
Sounds very corrupt, but I've experience that corruptness before. My grandpa in Peru was able to scape a speeding ticket by giving the policeman some money. It's very sad unfortunately, but there are probably several reasons why the cops do it. One may be that they don't make enough. Or they may just be simply corrupt regardless of any other reason.
Denvis
Wow I'm actually quite surprised. This shit never happens in Australia. I feel for your friend/driver, damn pigs don't know how to do their jobs properly so they harass innocent drivers in aims to achieve 'corrupt' money. If you get a chance to see them again, you should gather 'proof' if their little scandal and report it. Laughing
guissmo
Well in the Philippines, this happens a lot. The traffic enforcers here are more like predators waiting for a weak prey to get their bribe from. Kinda sad when you think about it, though.

Also, the cars they ask to pull over usually block the road to some extent and thereby making traffic heavier. Which I think is stupid. Neutral
speeDemon
well, India is a country with a dozen faces.. corruption, poverty, etc., but on the other hand, honesty is seen too..

You may find 80 % corrupt officials, but the rest of the 20% are honest, and right on track...
Actually, here, if you're not corrupt, you will most likely be relocated to some other place, away from your family and friends...

eg- you are a honest traffic policeman, you stop a doctor's/lawyer's/minister's etc. car for a valid reason, and dont let go of him, until he pays the (heavy)fine.. next thing you know, he'll call some big minister/Police official, and make him talk to you... in this case, 95% people would just listen to the bigger official and say, "yes, sir, yes, sir" and leave the driver.. in-case you are found to be 1 of the 5% left, then, you'd probably be transferred whenever the guy gets a chance to get you transferred...

So, to 'blend' in you have to be a little on the loose side... or in more political terms-"corrupt"
deanhills
speeDemon wrote:
So, to 'blend' in you have to be a little on the loose side... or in more political terms-"corrupt"
Right, like the traffic cops .... maybe they are trying to blend in? That is a very interesting notion, and I think you have a good point here. It may be so much part of the society's way of living, that very few really see it as wrong, and by giving the traffic cop what he asks for obviously his action is supported and will continue. But what choices are there for society though, as you say to survive, you need to "blend in".
speeDemon
deanhills wrote:
speeDemon wrote:
So, to 'blend' in you have to be a little on the loose side... or in more political terms-"corrupt"
But what choices are there for society though, as you say to survive, you need to "blend in".

Well what I can say is, that there arent many.. thats for sure.

In india, only around 3-5%(actualy even lesser) people are bothered to complain about any mishap. The other 95-97% are just too involved in their lives(or they dont have quite much of a 'life') s they just think about a thing for a moment, take their solutions and within minutes just do what they think is convinient(not always right).

The rest of the 5% people are a little more concerned. But they usually make a difference if they have a lot of money, or a very good reputation.. for example- one of my dad's friends is very obsessed with law and order(in a good way Smile ). He is a doctor, but he still tries to nab anyone who ever cheats on him, or does something wrong. Whenever something wrong happens with him he immediately goes to the consumer court(as most of his problems are related with the consumer problems) and files a case.

In such a way, the person who was cheating on him, or was being corrupt, gets to know that he cant get away with just about anything.. he may not change his ways, but he'll think twice next tym
deanhills
speeDemon wrote:
In india, only around 3-5%(actualy even lesser) people are bothered to complain about any mishap. The other 95-97% are just too involved in their lives(or they dont have quite much of a 'life') s they just think about a thing for a moment, take their solutions and within minutes just do what they think is convinient(not always right).
I would have thought that quite a large percentage would have acted this way out of fear of entanglement with the police? They rather go with the path of least confrontation?
speeDemon
deanhills wrote:
speeDemon wrote:
In india, only around 3-5%(actualy even lesser) people are bothered to complain about any mishap. The other 95-97% are just too involved in their lives(or they dont have quite much of a 'life') so they just think about a thing for a moment, take their solutions and within minutes just do what they think is convinient(not always right).
I would have thought that quite a large percentage would have acted this way out of fear of entanglement with the police? They rather go with the path of least confrontation?
True. no one wants to entagle with the police here, on the other hand, if you do try to complain, its useless unless you really want to get back at some official. In the latter case, you'd have to go to the police station again and again, the cycle may actually go on till months! and the result is usually next to nothing..
deanhills
speeDemon wrote:
True. no one wants to entagle with the police here, on the other hand, if you do try to complain, its useless unless you really want to get back at some official. In the latter case, you'd have to go to the police station again and again, the cycle may actually go on till months! and the result is usually next to nothing..
I guess that must be feeding off itself then. By not complaining, people are really supporting corruption. This is an extreme example, but women rape victims in Mexico also used to not complain when they were raped, feeling that that is useless as well because of prevailing sentiment that did not favour women, but this has been changing, and the Mexican Government has been doing much more because of women being brave to come forward and protest. The responsibility for sorting out corrupt behaviour does not only lie with the Government, but also with the citizens. If they do not come forward in this, i.e. report it to their representatives, or go out actively and make an issue about it, they should not be shocked when it is happening as they are supporting it by being quiet about it.
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