FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Fellow lovers of botanical oddities... (~image intensive~)





miacps
...I present you with a few of Earth's unique flora.

Lets start of with a couple ant plants. In nature, ants inhabit the cavernous caudex of these plants and provide it not only with protection, but also fertilization through droppings.

Here's Hydnophytum moseleyanum (papuanum)




and Myrmecodia beccarii.


Now for the plant that inspired this post. I got it in the mail a few days ago and it's my first Ant fern. This is Lecanopteris luzonensis.


A close up of its beautiful, hollow rhizome:


Finally, we get to a few carnivorous sundews from Australia. These plants belong to the Petiolaris Complex and are some of my favorite Drosera.

Drosera paradoxa - Mt. Bomford, Kimberley, WA




Drosera dilatato-petiolaris "TAHBWG3 clone"




This one I grew from seed; Drosera (lanata x broomensis) x ordensis




and last but not least; Drosera falconeri
driftingfe3s
Those sundews are real cool. Are these your own plants?
jwellsy
Thanks for sharing. Those are very cool. I had a Desert Rose for almost ten years (looked similar to the first pics). What growing zone do you live in? What kind of special requirements do they need?
wellerchap
those top ones look like they're from a horror film Shocked
The lumps & bumps look like a skin disease....if anyone had that I'd keep well away!!

Interesting hobby though....looks like a potential meal on the bottom petal of the bottom picture!
miacps
driftingfe3s wrote:
Those sundews are real cool. Are these your own plants?


Yes. Cool

jwellsy wrote:
Thanks for sharing. Those are very cool. I had a Desert Rose for almost ten years (looked similar to the first pics). What growing zone do you live in? What kind of special requirements do they need?


I'm in zone 10 (can't remember if it's 10a or 10b). Nearly all carnivorous plants require high light levels, pure mineral free water (aka Reverse osmosis, distilled, or rain water only) and acidic low nutrient soil (usually a peat and perlite mix, regular potting soil will kill them). I treat the ant plants/fern the same way but give them partial sun rather than full sun like I do with the petiolaris complex and other sundews.
coolclay
Those are amazing! I have always wanted to keep high requirement plants as such, but have never had the capacity or time. I stick to exotic very tolerant desert plants. But I really like your collection I am sure you have many more spectacular plants as well. Thanks for sharing!
miacps
coolclay wrote:
Those are amazing! I have always wanted to keep high requirement plants as such, but have never had the capacity or time. I stick to exotic very tolerant desert plants. But I really like your collection I am sure you have many more spectacular plants as well. Thanks for sharing!


Glad you enjoyed them. They're really quite easy to care for, some even do well on a bright windowsill for those who live in more northern climates.

Here are a few shots of a pitcher from a Nepenthes mirabilis that I grew from seed:



You can see the ants it preys on in this shot:


jabce85
awesome collection! i'd have to have a greenhouse to keep all of those year round. keep up the good work!
scallywag
What a fascinating post! I've never been a huge botany fan but those pictures are really nifty, thanks for sharing!
Crazy_Canuck
exceptional photography ... it's amazing that you are able to take such close-ups and keep the detail.

I note on the carnivorous plant, it almost looks like little droplets of moisture at the end of each of the "hairs." (sorry, I'm not a botanist ... I'm sure there's a proper technical term for that!)

Is this moisture involved in trapping the insects that the plant eats? Is it part of how the plant digests the insect?

Nature is so fascinating. The thought of plants 'eating' other organic life forms is quite remarkable.

Thank you for sharing your photos and your fascinating hobby!
Crinoid
I have a bonsai sized bottle tree on the windowsill Very Happy
carlospro7
Those are some really sweet plants. My wife and I are very inexperienced with growing plants, but we attempted to grow a few this past summer with more or less success. Nothing as cool as that though. Thanks for sharing
Related topics
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Lifestyle and News -> Hobbies and Animals

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.