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learn driving code to pass a driving theory test?





sigT
Today I failed a British driving theory test.

This is a bit strange considering that, to pass the test, one needs to answer correctly 44 questions out of 50. I managed only 42. Embarassed

It is even more strange considering that I'm an experienced driver, and I already have a full driving license from another country since 5 years.

The truth is, I only prepared myself using the Highway Code book (which has only rules in it) and didn't practice a simulation of a test on a DVD.

I'm wondering whether the Highway Code book is not needed at all! Now I'm certain that the only way to pass the theory test is to memorise all the answers from the DVD. Test questions sometimes sound as if invented by a machine, with no common sense at all.

If you have a driving license, did you really study the driving code? Did you practice using a CD/DVD or a test book?
deanhills
sigT wrote:
Today I failed a British driving theory test.

This is a bit strange considering that, to pass the test, one needs to answer correctly 44 questions out of 50. I managed only 42. Embarassed

It is even more strange considering that I'm an experienced driver, and I already have a full driving license from another country since 5 years.

The truth is, I only prepared myself using the Highway Code book (which has only rules in it) and didn't practice a simulation of a test on a DVD.

I'm wondering whether the Highway Code book is not needed at all! Now I'm certain that the only way to pass the theory test is to memorise all the answers from the DVD. Test questions sometimes sound as if invented by a machine, with no common sense at all.

If you have a driving license, did you really study the driving code? Did you practice using a CD/DVD or a test book?
You're not unique in this. It is very easy to fail these tests. Is this the one where you do it on a touch screen, and you get all kinds of scenarios to choose from in multiple choices? As some of the answers are so close, it is almost a psychological type test of a kind. I won't worry about it, I'm sure the percentage of people that fail must be equal to those who pass, and I wonder how many who pass were just lucky in the choices they made out of the multiple type answers. I also don't think there is anything you can use for practice, as they must be recycling an enormous database of these type of test questions. If I were you, I would just take my time and carefully look at the questions and answers with lots of focus and concentration. And relax as there is always another time you can try again. Maybe the authorities are trying to make money out of this too, like hiding the road signs for the speed limits so that they can catch you with cameras ... Smile
sigT
deanhills wrote:
Is this the one where you do it on a touch screen, and you get all kinds of scenarios to choose from in multiple choices?


Yes, this is the one. Presumably it's a common type of a test. There was a second part which I easily passed where mouse clicks are used to identify hazards in video clips. The screen resolution was quite low, I must admit. Must be a challenge for short-sighted people.

With this kind of tests, one should be comfortable with memorising answers.
Ghost Rider103
I actually did not study anything before taking my drivers test to get my license.

Though I will admit I failed my very first time. But I came back a week later, and got every one of them correct. Not really sure how that worked, but I think I just needed to read the question again and understand it a bit better.

A lot of the questions are not difficult, but just worded differently to make it seem a bit tricky. Try reading the question a few times before making your final decision. I think that is what helped me.
AftershockVibe
The multiple choice questions on the theory test I found to be the easiest test I've ever had. I got full marks when I took it a few years ago. Most questions are common sense but for the few awkward ones (exact distances, odd situations etc) you can just memorise.

I'd argue that memorisation is not a problem for these tests. They're not testing your intelligence, they're testing your ability to drive in a predictable and legal manner (at least theoretically). Learn the rules and you will pass. When to bend the rules comes form experience which is not what they are testing. Besides, you need to know the rules before you can do that anyway. If I were you I'd just get the question book (they are all officially published) and memorise the non-obvious ones.


The hazard perception part I also passed and had practive with a CD/DVD beforehand. If you remember what you're supposed to be doing then this is also pretty easy to pass.

I found the practice pretty awkward until I gave it what it wanted. Just hit the space bar (or click) whenever anything might cause you to slow down or change speed. Similarly, hit it again if something you've already seen changes behaviour. e.g. Pedestrian starts wandering left or a car emerges after you've already flagged it approaching a junction. It's almost impossible to hit the space bar too many times (or at least it was two years ago) unless you're being riduculous. You're only penalised for the ones you miss, registering one twice doesn't count against you.

For me, this is quite different from they way I would assume it worked and how I drive. If I was driving then I would probably register a pedestrian walking, then again take special note if they looked like they were going to cross the road. This would be probably two separate actions equating to two key presses (although subconsciously I'd be paying attention to him/her). The test would probably want three for full marks, with an extra one for them going towards the curb or something. Just learn to play the game and you can pass quite easily.

As for resolution "being a challenge for short sighted people" I can't really see your objection. If you can't see a screen properly at a distance in front of you that you can especially set, then I question you ability to properly see either your dash or hazards when driving!
ninjakannon
AftershockVibe wrote:
I found the practice pretty awkward until I gave it what it wanted. Just hit the space bar (or click) whenever anything might cause you to slow down or change speed. Similarly, hit it again if something you've already seen changes behaviour. e.g. Pedestrian starts wandering left or a car emerges after you've already flagged it approaching a junction. It's almost impossible to hit the space bar too many times (or at least it was two years ago) unless you're being riduculous. You're only penalised for the ones you miss, registering one twice doesn't count against you.

But remember that you are penalised if you click too often! If this was not the case, you could just repeatedly click and pass with full marks. The hazard perception section is best passed by learning how to take the test - it's exam technique. Well done for passing it, sigT, I haven't met a person yet who doesn't think it's a flawed system.

I advise you to get a practice DVD for the multiple choice questions. My driving instructor lent me his and I went through every question on the DVD as well as doing a load of tests. As has been said, you only really need to memorise things like stopping distances, how they change with conditions and such things. Most of it is obvious.

After using the DVD the actual test was really easy, I got 49 out of 50 (only getting a documents question wrong, one you're told about at the appropriate time anyway!). The questions are different from the DVD, but very similar.

Good luck next time!
sigT
Thanks to AftershockVibe for a considerate answer. It's the kind of an answer that is, although a centrist one, still general enough to apply to a range of eventualities.

However, it's still a centrist view of the problem. Razz I was told lately that the success ratio of this test stands around 90%. I wouldn't be surprised if many people shared the same views as yours. I belong to a tiny percentage of people who failed despite having successful tests passed in other countries. I passed similar tests twice and I have two driving licences, although I cannot use any of these to drive in the UK for more than one year. This was my third theory test and the first failure altogether.

AftershockVibe wrote:
I'd argue that memorisation is not a problem for these tests. They're not testing your intelligence, they're testing your ability to drive in a predictable and legal manner (at least theoretically). Learn the rules and you will pass.


I'm quite certain that it is a major problem. It's not the case that I couldn't pass the test because I didn't read the code. I did, although I hated every page as I read since I had to sacrifice working time to re-educate myself in the subject that does not worth spending time. Moreover, I noticed some kind of a distortion effect when what I knew from earlier times slightly disagreed with the British rules of the road. I agree though that memorisation is not an issue when allocation of time for studies is not a problem, and especially when it is the first such test. Could it be that both conditions are satisfied in 70-80% cases? Since memorisation is the key to success, it should be a problem to be solved, yet trivial for the majority.

AftershockVibe wrote:

The hazard perception part I also passed and had practive with a CD/DVD beforehand. If you remember what you're supposed to be doing then this is also pretty easy to pass. Passing this part of the test I found the practice pretty awkward until I gave it what it wanted.


I absolutely agree with this. For once I found that video games that I played at school gave me a useful skill of cheating just enough to earn the points. This part of a test reminded me of action games of early 90's often played in their time on small CRT screens with relatively poor resolution. I think that creators of the hazard perception part might have made a more realistic simulation if they employed some more recent gaming technologies. Smile

AftershockVibe wrote:

As for resolution "being a challenge for short sighted people" I can't really see your objection.

It's because there was no objection. Smile Serious problems with sight may lead to a failed driving theory test. And, the testing authority saves money on monitors.
deanhills
sigT wrote:
Thanks to AftershockVibe for a considerate answer. It's the kind of an answer that is, although a centrist one, still general enough to apply to a range of eventualities.
Maybe the fact that so many people fail the first test, and ace the second time round could show that people are not that comfortable with on-line testing, and that it took the first test to prepare them for the second test. Maybe it would have been fair if there had been a practice test session that you could have taken your time with before the start of the first test. Better yet, there should be a practice cubicle where you can test yourself at your convenience ahead of taking the test. I wonder whether there are any of these simulated tests available online?
Jamestf347
Wow in the states you have to pass 15/18 correct. What kind of questions do they ask?
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