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Twin towers fallout lingers ...........





subirbasak
Quote:
People near the World Trade Center during the 9/11 attacks show higher-than-normal rates of asthma, stress several years afterward...
As many as 25,500 people have developed asthma after exposure to dust from the fall of the World Trade Center towers during the terrorist attack on New York City on September 11, 2001, a new report suggests.

Even more people, an estimated 61,000, have experienced post-trauma stress and related mental health problems after witnessing the twin towers fall, researchers estimate in the study, published in the Aug. 5 Journal of the American Medical Association.

“This confirms what we are seeing,” says Jacqueline Moline, a physician at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City who runs a medical monitoring and treatment program for people affected by the tragedy. “The emotional side of this is not letting up.”

About 409,000 people were in the vicinity when the towers came down on September 11. Using telephone, e-mail and in-person interviews, researchers created a health registry by surveying more than 70,000 of them in 2003 and 2004 and contacting 46,000 in a second survey in 2006 and 2007. Survey participants were all adults and included office workers, residents of the area, passersby and rescue workers.

The new data show that more than 10 percent of exposed people who did not have asthma before the attack developed the breathing disorder during the six years afterward. Normally less than 3 percent of the adult population would be expected to develop asthma over a six-year period, says coauthor Lorna Thorpe, deputy commissioner of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Hardest hit were rescuers who worked on the rubble pile. The survey shows that 21 percent of those workers with no previous history of asthma have developed it since the disaster. Even among passersby with no history of the ailment — most of whom spent less than a day in the dust — asthma incidence is now nearly 9 percent.

While the number of new asthma cases among people in this registry declined between surveys, the percentage reporting post-trauma stress symptoms in the second survey was higher than in the first. Among those near the towers on September 11 who reported no traumatic stress before the attacks, 14 percent reported symptoms of it in the first survey and 19 percent in the second survey. About half of those reporting emotional stress several years after the event said they didn’t seek care for it, suggesting their quality of life may be suffering, says study coauthor Robert Brackbill, an epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

By extrapolating these data to apply to the 409,000 people in the towers’ vicinity, the authors estimate conservatively that 25,500 people may have developed new asthma and 61,000 may have experienced post-trauma stress since the disaster.

“We’ve learned that after a major disaster of this magnitude — where people get injured or witness horrific events — their lives are impacted in a multiplicity of ways,” Thorpe says. “They are all at high risk of mental health symptoms and post-traumatic stress, and it takes a really major toll on the function of their daily lives.”

She said the study points to the need for public health authorities to protect first responders better and to establish screening programs to monitor people after disasters.

The registry participants provide scientists with a group that may help to reveal the physical and mental health effects of huge disasters, Moline says. “And that can allow us to learn how best to treat people when another disaster occurs, whether man-made or natural.”

A third survey is under way and the results will be available within two years
............... Sad Sad Sad Question

mOrpheuS wrote:
Please use quote tags when posting text that you haven't written yourself.
LimpFish
nothing good for sure came out of knocking these towers down Sad
deanhills
When I'm looking at old movies that have scenes in New York, I always look out for the twin towers, as that obviously says whether the movie was filmed before or after 2001. I can imagine that those who survived on that terrible day, did not think at all about the dust problems, nor other environmental hazards to their health.
LimpFish
deanhills wrote:
When I'm looking at old movies that have scenes in New York, I always look out for the twin towers, as that obviously says whether the movie was filmed before or after 2001. I can imagine that those who survived on that terrible day, did not think at all about the dust problems, nor other environmental hazards to their health.


Yeah I agree. Living through a traumatic thing like that, you're probably not even aware what youre breathing in, unless it is directly affecting you. It was not a time to think about stuff that might be dangerous in the long run, more like save your life right now..
deanhills
LimpFish wrote:
Yeah I agree. Living through a traumatic thing like that, you're probably not even aware what youre breathing in, unless it is directly affecting you. It was not a time to think about stuff that might be dangerous in the long run, more like save your life right now..
Maybe gas masks should feature high on the list of emergency equipment that should be available to everyone. Not only for acts of terror, as it would appear that the air we are breathing may be at risk for lots of things, so if all of us were equipped with gas masks, and gas masks are readily available everywhere, we can use them in cases of emergency. I was just thinking, if I were to go out to buy a gas mask, I would not even know where to begin, and/or what to get, and possibly it would also be quite expensive. Maybe it should be on the top of the list for compulsory safety equipment in case of emergency, such as fire extinguishers are. Smile
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
I was just thinking, if I were to go out to buy a gas mask, I would not even know where to begin, and/or what to get, and possibly it would also be quite expensive.

Military surplus. The equipment is top-notch, prices are reasonable, and it is widely available.
Get a commonly used mask (like a US or Russian model), so that extra canisters are easy to find.

(Masks come in at least two parts: the mask itself, and the filter canister. The mask is reusable, and will last a long time. The filter canisters are consumables though. Once taken out of their sealed packages, they only last for a specified time before they must be changed out again.)

When buying filter canisters for it, make sure they are still sealed in the original package. Once un-sealed they only last for a set amount of time before they can't filter as well anymore. (Though even a used-up canister would still filter dust out.)

If you're getting it for emergency preparedness, look up the instructions, and learn how to put it on quickly. You might also want to consider the full chem-gear setup for complete protection.

Oh, yeah... and it won't work if you have a beard or any kind of facial hair other than a mustache, which kind of messes up the idea of having them available to everyone.

Also, depending on the style of mask, you'll have to find the right size. Some are one-size-fits-all. The one the USAF uses comes in 6 different sizes. I have no idea where a civilian could go to find out which size of gas mask to buy.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
deanhills wrote:
I was just thinking, if I were to go out to buy a gas mask, I would not even know where to begin, and/or what to get, and possibly it would also be quite expensive.

Military surplus. The equipment is top-notch, prices are reasonable, and it is widely available.
Get a commonly used mask (like a US or Russian model), so that extra canisters are easy to find.

(Masks come in at least two parts: the mask itself, and the filter canister. The mask is reusable, and will last a long time. The filter canisters are consumables though. Once taken out of their sealed packages, they only last for a specified time before they must be changed out again.)

When buying filter canisters for it, make sure they are still sealed in the original package. Once un-sealed they only last for a set amount of time before they can't filter as well anymore. (Though even a used-up canister would still filter dust out.)

If you're getting it for emergency preparedness, look up the instructions, and learn how to put it on quickly. You might also want to consider the full chem-gear setup for complete protection.

Oh, yeah... and it won't work if you have a beard or any kind of facial hair other than a mustache, which kind of messes up the idea of having them available to everyone.

Also, depending on the style of mask, you'll have to find the right size. Some are one-size-fits-all. The one the USAF uses comes in 6 different sizes. I have no idea where a civilian could go to find out which size of gas mask to buy.
Thanks for the tip. Wow! I like the full chem-gear setup, do you have these at home as well?
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
Thanks for the tip. Wow! I like the full chem-gear setup, do you have these at home as well?

I've only been issued a 'training' set. They're a real set that has passed its expiration date. It'll still offer protection against some things, but not everything a fresh suit would.
The chem suit works the same way as a gas mask canister... it also only works for a limited time after being taken out of its packaging, but still offers some protection even when used up.
If I get sent overseas, or deployed to a war zone, I'll be issued a new full set, still in the packaging.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
deanhills wrote:
Thanks for the tip. Wow! I like the full chem-gear setup, do you have these at home as well?

I've only been issued a 'training' set. They're a real set that has passed its expiration date. It'll still offer protection against some things, but not everything a fresh suit would.
The chem suit works the same way as a gas mask canister... it also only works for a limited time after being taken out of its packaging, but still offers some protection even when used up.
If I get sent overseas, or deployed to a war zone, I'll be issued a new full set, still in the packaging.
I just saw a movie tonight again of something that is realistically possible. A run-away train in an underground station, with lots of dust everywhere. It crashed through a number of walls. The police immeidately were able to put on masks like the ones you described. The victims of course had nothing like that available. Wonder whether they should have some supplies of those as emergency equipment in the underground stations.
ocalhoun
deanhills wrote:
Wonder whether they should have some supplies of those as emergency equipment in the underground stations.

Masks like I'm talking about would be impractical for this. They are too expensive to buy large quantities of, they require regular maintenance, inspections, and cleaning, have a limited shelf life, and they require training to use effectively.

Something like this would be much more practical for large-scale disaster preparedness:

It would offer MUCH less comprehensive protection, but they are cheap, don't need maintenance, have practically unlimited shelf life, and people can use them without special training.
deanhills
ocalhoun wrote:
deanhills wrote:
Wonder whether they should have some supplies of those as emergency equipment in the underground stations.

Masks like I'm talking about would be impractical for this. They are too expensive to buy large quantities of, they require regular maintenance, inspections, and cleaning, have a limited shelf life, and they require training to use effectively.

Something like this would be much more practical for large-scale disaster preparedness:

It would offer MUCH less comprehensive protection, but they are cheap, don't need maintenance, have practically unlimited shelf life, and people can use them without special training.
I've seen quite a number of people from Asia wearing them already, so has to be a good idea, although when one would be in extreme toxic situations, it would have limited protection. I guess one would then try to get out of harm's way as soon as one can. Or, someone should be able to design gas masks that are in the middle between the military one, and the one in your suggestion.
LimpFish
Makes me think of when we had NBC (Nuclear- Biological - Chemical) warfare training in the army... One guy in my platoon had forgotten to screw on his filter on his gas mask, so it was just hanging there, and when the tear gas came... he FREAKED out really bad! Laughing
deanhills
LimpFish wrote:
Makes me think of when we had NBC (Nuclear- Biological - Chemical) warfare training in the army... One guy in my platoon had forgotten to screw on his filter on his gas mask, so it was just hanging there, and when the tear gas came... he FREAKED out really bad! Laughing
Laughing Laughing Laughing Wow! Was that covered in the safety guidelines: Remember to screw on the filter of the gas mask? Wow, it must have been pretty awful. Just one whiff of tear gas, and that is enough to really want you to run for fresh air. Smile
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