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Electric vs Induction cooker





chatrack
Do you use Induction cooker?

Do you think old heating coil oven is more efficient than induction cooker?

Dennise
.... not sure what is meant by a "heating coil cooker"?

If a heating coil cooker is the standard coil on an electric cook-top range, then an induction cooker is the more efficient. This is simply because the induction cooker tends to confine the heat to inside the cooking vessel, while a standard cook top looses a lot of heat that doesn't reach the cooking target.
chatrack
Induction cooker heats the food only with in the pan. But hot heat up the metal pan. I think it uses
eddy current for it. But how it could heat up food/water only, not the pan?
mshafiq
I guess old heating coils are efficient
However I can not say it for sure as I never experienced it myself.
Can someone describe more about 'how this induction works?'.

Thanks!!!
mOrpheuS
chatrack wrote:
Induction cooker heats the food only with in the pan. But hot heat up the metal pan. I think it uses
eddy current for it. But how it could heat up food/water only, not the pan?

I believe it is quite the opposite.

Induction cooker heats up the pan, which in turn heats up the food within it.

It's a microwave oven that would heat up the food directly.
Bikerman
Is correct.
An electro-magnet is used - an oscillating current is applied. This induces a current in the metal pot and heats it up. There is a hysteresis effect as well (probably what you are calling 'eddy currents), but that is only about 5-10% of the total heat.
ocalhoun
Bikerman wrote:
Is correct.
An electro-magnet is used - an oscillating current is applied. This induces a current in the metal pot and heats it up.

Wouldn't that cause significant problems for any electronics nearby?
Bikerman
ocalhoun wrote:
Bikerman wrote:
Is correct.
An electro-magnet is used - an oscillating current is applied. This induces a current in the metal pot and heats it up.

Wouldn't that cause significant problems for any electronics nearby?
Take a big magnet into your kitchen. Swing it around your body. Any problems?
Only if something is close enough to be affected by the magnetic field. So you wouldn't put a box of floppy disks too close if you had any sense, but otherwise no special problems...
ocalhoun
Bikerman wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:

Wouldn't that cause significant problems for any electronics nearby?
Take a big magnet into your kitchen. Swing it around your body. Any problems?

It would have to be an awfully big magnet being swung around to be able to heat up a pan...

But, I suppose you're right, the power output must be too low to cause damage most of the time. I wonder what kind of power output they have? (And what frequency they operate at.)
chatrack
My friend told me it is good for boiling water. Faster than LPG burner. But not good for heavy cooking. He said , you can take the metal pot with bare hands, still the water in it is too hot to touch. I think there is more to know about its working
Bikerman
wiki has a good article on the matter
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_cooker
mshafiq
Bikerman wrote:
wiki has a good article on the matter
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_cooker


Wow! Excellent explanation at wiki.

I wonder if some one who is using this kind of cooker to verify if it is really unable to cook/heat material inside a glass or plastic based container and if container is made of aluminum then how it acted (cooked in more time ..?).

Anyway, one thing is clear that it (Induction Cooker) is more efficient than any traditional one.

Thanks!
ProwerBot
Bikerman wrote:

Only if something is close enough to be affected by the magnetic field. So you wouldn't put a box of floppy disks too close if you had any sense, but otherwise no special problems...

Yeah. Because everyone still uses floppy disks (:
Bikerman
ProwerBot wrote:
Bikerman wrote:

Only if something is close enough to be affected by the magnetic field. So you wouldn't put a box of floppy disks too close if you had any sense, but otherwise no special problems...

Yeah. Because everyone still uses floppy disks (:
Many people do - including me. Not so often nowadays, because a USB drive is normally better suited, but not always. Some machines have USB deliberately 'locked-down' and there are some applications which will not read directly from a pen-drive for data where they will read from a floppy drive....
mshafiq
Bikerman wrote:
Many people do - including me. .......


Exactly there is still usage of floppy disks (and floppy drives too).
For example my company made some devices for TV Broadcasters (say about 12+ years ago).
Because we are a big and Public company and we support of clients, we still support those products too.
Although our new product are even do not contain hard-disks (and use USB ports, flash drive, network connections etc.).

So the point is there should not be any bad smile if some used floppy disks in the discussion. They are really in use because of any/some reason(s).
lightwate
Yes, it is more efficient to use an induction cooker over the traditional electric one because it doesn't have to undergo that much heat conduction, which wastes some energy.

The only downside i can think of is you need a special pan to cook food on it. But I like the idea of induction cooking xD
yagnyavalkya
Induction cooler is more efficient but what about the flame stove when compared to these two?
chatrack
yagnyavalkya wrote:
Induction cooler is more efficient but what about the flame stove when compared to these two?


Flame stove consume more time to cook. And it couse black carbon to stick at the bottom of pan, which will be hard to remove. Then considering the fuel, though kerosene / LPG are non-renewable energy sources, it is better to preserve them.
yagnyavalkya
Induction stove is handy when cooking metal vessels
mshafiq
yagnyavalkya wrote:
Induction stove is handy when cooking metal vessels


so do you mean it is not good for glasses.
If we need to heat a glass vessel, how can we use it.
Should there be some gape between vessel bottom and the surface of the oven/cooking range.

Apparently it is durable glass surface on that cooking range so what complication might be because of this surface.
Thanks
Bikerman
Induction hobs will not work with glass containers. The container/pan needs to be ferro-magnetic and it needs to conduct electricity.
tazone
induction is the best

but microwave would be even better
microwave with wet food is even more the better one
spinkle water on the food
chatrack
Hi,

If induction cooker work on metal only, is it harm our electronic watch
while cooking. Or is it burn us, if we wear a gold (or any metal) chain or bangle while cooking near it ?
jetgirltaxi
chatrack wrote:
Hi,

If induction cooker work on metal only, is it harm our electronic watch
while cooking. Or is it burn us, if we wear a gold (or any metal) chain or bangle while cooking near it ?


Probably not, unless your metal chain is actually ON the induction surface or within a few millimeters of it. Remember the inverse square law, the magnetic field strength decreases by 4 when you double the distance, 16 when you double it again. If the bracelet or chain had to be within a centimeter or so of the coil to experience heating effects, moving it ten centimeters decreases the field strength by a factor of 100.
jetgirltaxi
jetgirltaxi wrote:
chatrack wrote:
Hi,

If induction cooker work on metal only, is it harm our electronic watch
while cooking. Or is it burn us, if we wear a gold (or any metal) chain or bangle while cooking near it ?


Probably not, unless your metal chain is actually ON the induction surface or within a few millimeters of it. Remember the inverse square law, the magnetic field strength decreases by 4 when you double the distance, 16 when you double it again. If the bracelet or chain had to be within a centimeter or so of the coil to experience heating effects, moving it ten centimeters decreases the field strength by a factor of 100.


And now that I think about it, your chain would have to be made of iron or some other MAGNETIC metal. Induction cookers use a high-frequency current to actually make the iron atoms vibrate, which produces the heat. Gold, silver, copper, aluminum would be unaffected by this, they are non-magnetic.
ocalhoun
jetgirltaxi wrote:

And now that I think about it, your chain would have to be made of iron or some other MAGNETIC metal. Induction cookers use a high-frequency current to actually make the iron atoms vibrate, which produces the heat. Gold, silver, copper, aluminum would be unaffected by this, they are non-magnetic.

Anything that conducts electricity is subject to induction if put within a moving magnetic field.
(Electric generators usually use a moving magnet to induce current in copper coils.)

So, no, any metal you put within the induction field should heat up.
(Though gold and copper, being very good conductors, might heat up less due to their smaller electrical resistance.)
chatrack
jetgirltaxi wrote:
Induction cookers use a high-frequency current to actually make the iron atoms vibrate, which produces the heat. Gold, silver, copper, aluminum would be unaffected by this, they are non-magnetic.


Thanks for the idea, that change in magnetic field make the Fe atoms vibrate. I was thinking
that , due to induction, eddy current will setup in the pot and that make the metal pot hot up.

Now I remember that the instruction manual of the cooker said you need to use steel or stainless steel
for the cooker pot/pan

So, there is another question..
Is soft iron or steel ..which is best suited for working with induction cooker pan?
jetgirltaxi
chatrack wrote:
jetgirltaxi wrote:
Induction cookers use a high-frequency current to actually make the iron atoms vibrate, which produces the heat. Gold, silver, copper, aluminum would be unaffected by this, they are non-magnetic.


Thanks for the idea, that change in magnetic field make the Fe atoms vibrate. I was thinking
that , due to induction, eddy current will setup in the pot and that make the metal pot hot up.

Now I remember that the instruction manual of the cooker said you need to use steel or stainless steel
for the cooker pot/pan

So, there is another question..
Is soft iron or steel ..which is best suited for working with induction cooker pan?


Stainless steel is actually only weakly magnetic, due to the carbon atoms in the matrix. Ordinary steel would be better, soft iron would be the best. Iron pots are the best for cooking the more conventional way as well. Iron coated with Teflon should work just as well.
jetgirltaxi
ocalhoun wrote:
jetgirltaxi wrote:

And now that I think about it, your chain would have to be made of iron or some other MAGNETIC metal. Induction cookers use a high-frequency current to actually make the iron atoms vibrate, which produces the heat. Gold, silver, copper, aluminum would be unaffected by this, they are non-magnetic.

Anything that conducts electricity is subject to induction if put within a moving magnetic field.
(Electric generators usually use a moving magnet to induce current in copper coils.)

So, no, any metal you put within the induction field should heat up.
(Though gold and copper, being very good conductors, might heat up less due to their smaller electrical resistance.)


Any electrical conductor placed in the field (pretty much any metal, and some non-metals like carbon) will have a current induced in it, which will heat it up slightly. Only in metals which have magnetic poles (iron, nickel, cobalt, and a few others) will the high-frequency magnetic field cause the atoms to vibrate. This is what generates most of the heating effect; the dancing atoms, not the induced current.
ocalhoun
jetgirltaxi wrote:
Only in metals which have magnetic poles (iron, nickel, cobalt, and a few others) will the high-frequency magnetic field cause the atoms to vibrate. This is what generates most of the heating effect; the dancing atoms, not the induced current.

Ah, so the name is inaccurate then, since it doesn't rely on induction...
I had the theory of its operation wrong all this time...
And that also explains why its effect on electronics isn't a problem... magnetic vibration heating probably takes a lot less power than I was assuming would be needed for actual induction heating.
jetgirltaxi
ocalhoun wrote:
jetgirltaxi wrote:
Only in metals which have magnetic poles (iron, nickel, cobalt, and a few others) will the high-frequency magnetic field cause the atoms to vibrate. This is what generates most of the heating effect; the dancing atoms, not the induced current.

Ah, so the name is inaccurate then, since it doesn't rely on induction...
I had the theory of its operation wrong all this time...
And that also explains why its effect on electronics isn't a problem... magnetic vibration heating probably takes a lot less power than I was assuming would be needed for actual induction heating.


You're right, the name is misleading. You're taking about using electrical induction to generate eddy currents in nearby metal objects (as if they were the secondary coil in a transformer), thereby heating them up due to their inherent electrical resistance. Yes that's what I thought initially as well and yes I imagine that would take a lot more power.
chatrack
Hi,
In that case I can suggest another suitable name: Kinetiser
narashiman
There is also yet another reason that a magnetic induction stove requires the bottom of the vessel to be flat and large where us there is no opinion like that in stoves with gasoline.
ocalhoun
narashiman wrote:
stoves with gasoline.

Where is it common to use stoves that burn gasoline?
riteshk1
Yes i have used induction cooker and its working good i feel very comfortable by using induction cooker.
Insanity
I have the gas powered stove right now, but I think induction stovetops are pretty cool. They are much safer than gas or electric powered stoves, since they only heat the pan or pot. If you touch the surface, it is still going to be cold.
Iceaxe0410
I've used an induction cooker before and I'd say it's pretty good from what I tried with it. I would make a switch, but I would at least keep one heating coil or conventional gas flame stove top. There are some disadvantages to induction. The primary one being that you can't use pyrex, aluminum, or copper cookware with it unless if you have a special one that heats anything. Most people use steel or ironware anyway so it's not really much of a problem. A smaller disadvantage is that there are no open flames or heating element to cause a flame. Can't really char or use the flame to light up alcohol if you're making that type of dish (Again not so much a big deal since you could just light up a match or use a lighter). It's especially not very good for stir fry or any recipes calling for the use of a wok.
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