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Fist timer for Linux





Twotone
After some deliberation i decided to try Linux (currently using win XP Pro SP3)
I must say i was confused by all the different distributions but finally found Xubuntu 9.04
Seeing this could be run from a cd i took a chance and downloaded it.
I was quite surprised it booted up and gave me a pleasant desktop with applications etc.

My questions are....before i install to my hard drive..
1 Do you think this is a good distribution for a novice.
2 Can i upgrade to full ubuntu after
3 Has anyone had any problems installing as a dual boot system (data loss ?)

Thanks for any replies ....from a possible Linux convert Smile
Peterssidan
1. yes. Ubuntu is quite easy to use for 'novice' users so I think Xubuntu is it too. But you will learn a lot more by using a dist aimed at more advanced users.
2. Don't know. I think you will have to uninstall Xubuntu in order to install Ubuntu.
3. As long as you install your GNU/Linux dist on a different partition and install Xubuntu after you installed windows it should be no problem.
misterXY
l went with Kubuntu, and l was a hard user in Win 2000nt, xp sp2 and sp2, vista 32 and 64x. Also learn some linux stuff, l installed it on my laptop, which had a hardtime too get my wireless going, and edited my grub (duplicates removed).
Run it live if you haven't and see if it runs everything you'll want.
Make a partition when your installing (It'll give you an option l think, or use Windows too make a partion)
If something doesn't goto plan before you install or wondering, you can simply reboot.
Install and enjoy!
Any trouble or questions just goto the ubuntu forums, they saved my ass a few times Smile
Fire Boar
The difference between ubuntu, kubuntu and xubuntu is the desktop environment, and which one you choose is purely a matter of taste. Personally, given the way things are going now I would not recommend kubuntu to a new Linux user. KDE (desktop used in kubuntu) is a little more confusing than Gnome and the newest version isn't quite stable yet, so if you want to use kubuntu you should not go for any version higher than 8.04 (long term support). Ubuntu uses Gnome, which is really easy to get to grips with. I like it, but I much prefer the stable KDE 3. Another big advantage of choosing the main ubuntu is that most applications you will find are developed with Gnome in mind, especially seeing as Gnome is the ubuntu maintainers' desktop of choice. Finally, xubuntu I can't say much on as I haven't experienced XFCE yet. However, I do know that XFCE (the desktop environment in xubuntu) is lighter than both Gnome and KDE.

If you want to, you can actually install more than one of these desktops. Go into the package manager and install the relevant -desktop package. For example, if you start with XFCE and decide you want to try Gnome, you'd install ubuntu-desktop. kubuntu-desktop and xubuntu-desktop are the other packages available (also edubuntu-desktop, but you won't want that Smile ). Then you can simply select the desktop environment you want to use whenever you log in. Be aware that you will end up with a LOT of similar packages that do much the same thing if you do this. If you start with Gnome and grab the kubuntu-desktop package, for example, you end up with both Pidgin and Kopete. Both are nearly identical in their purpose (multi-protocol instant messenger) so it could be a bit redundant. Then again, you might decide you want a lot of different gadgets to play with.

It's really up to you what you go with. One of the *buntu distributions is a good start, definitely. Plain ubuntu or kubuntu 8.04 is recommended, at least until KDE 4 becomes more stable.
Rajiev
If the question is still open....

I was a total n00b for linux 1 year ago and Now I know My way around in linuxbecause of Ubuntu Smile. Better yet I'm promoting Ubuntu. It is Soooo Easy to use and installs all the drivers, common programmes, tools within 30 to 50 minutes of time.

What I love most About It is When the OS is Finished Installing, YOU have a Complete system with over 90%thigns you'll need already installed.

It is portabel - So you can Remove your HDD and Plug toa another mashione and use Smile

And its a life saver for recovering messed up PCs.

But there is a downside too.

Most of "uncommen" Hardware will have driver issues (or no drivers at all Sad

Games and some high end Windows applications wont run in linux. Even with a excellent virtualization of programmes like WINE.

YOu MUST have a Net connection to install the codecs and security updates...
Twotone
Thank you all for your replies Smile

progress so far:
Tried Xubuntu 9.04 from a live cd on my laptop
Installed it from within windows using Wubi...everything went well and do like it.
Downloaded ubuntu 9.04 and have tried it from the live cd on my desktop
Prefer the gnome desktop to xfce
Still testing things out but so far enjoying the experience.
misterXY
Fire Boar wrote:
The difference between ubuntu, kubuntu and xubuntu is the desktop environment, and which one you choose is purely a matter of taste. Personally, given the way things are going now I would not recommend kubuntu to a new Linux user. KDE (desktop used in kubuntu) is a little more confusing than Gnome and the newest version isn't quite stable yet, so if you want to use kubuntu you should not go for any version higher than 8.04 (long term support). Ubuntu uses Gnome, which is really easy to get to grips with. I like it, but I much prefer the stable KDE 3. Another big advantage of choosing the main ubuntu is that most applications you will find are developed with Gnome in mind, especially seeing as Gnome is the ubuntu maintainers' desktop of choice. Finally, xubuntu I can't say much on as I haven't experienced XFCE yet. However, I do know that XFCE (the desktop environment in xubuntu) is lighter than both Gnome and KDE.

If you want to, you can actually install more than one of these desktops. Go into the package manager and install the relevant -desktop package. For example, if you start with XFCE and decide you want to try Gnome, you'd install ubuntu-desktop. kubuntu-desktop and xubuntu-desktop are the other packages available (also edubuntu-desktop, but you won't want that Smile ). Then you can simply select the desktop environment you want to use whenever you log in. Be aware that you will end up with a LOT of similar packages that do much the same thing if you do this. If you start with Gnome and grab the kubuntu-desktop package, for example, you end up with both Pidgin and Kopete. Both are nearly identical in their purpose (multi-protocol instant messenger) so it could be a bit redundant. Then again, you might decide you want a lot of different gadgets to play with.

It's really up to you what you go with. One of the *buntu distributions is a good start, definitely. Plain ubuntu or kubuntu 8.04 is recommended, at least until KDE 4 becomes more stable.


Just bookmarked this just incase if any of my friends want to try linux, thanks. l'm running kde and it runs better then 8.04 did, that one crashes ALOT.... the new one, much more stable... l tried on three systems, two business type and a regular download, graphics, etc..and worked better then 8.04...

Kubutnu is the third linux l tried, don't like gnome and learn alot more from kde then gnome, and kubutnu is pretty much the first linux l use everyday not just for a week. my taste is odd, l know Smile
Rajiev
well,
If you are more concerned on the GUi and the desktop environment,
I think YOu should try Kubuntu. It has the best looks amoung Ubuntu distros Smile

But, Most help is available to Ubuntu and GNOME.

But I think you should definitly try Kubuntu.
noah
Very few people need help with their GUI. Linux is the same under the hood of (K)(X)Ubuntu. If you can handle the command prompt you should be fine with whatever version you choose.
ocalhoun
Rajiev wrote:
well,
If you are more concerned on the GUi and the desktop environment,
I think YOu should try Kubuntu. It has the best looks amoung Ubuntu distros Smile

But, Most help is available to Ubuntu and GNOME.

But I think you should definitly try Kubuntu.

I would suggest a distro that is 'KDE native' rather than a version of Ubuntu made to use KDE...
It'll have better support and work more smoothly, having been built to run KDE from the start.
Rajiev
ocalhoun wrote:
Rajiev wrote:
well,
If you are more concerned on the GUi and the desktop environment,
I think YOu should try Kubuntu. It has the best looks amoung Ubuntu distros Smile

But, Most help is available to Ubuntu and GNOME.

But I think you should definitly try Kubuntu.

I would suggest a distro that is 'KDE native' rather than a version of Ubuntu made to use KDE...
It'll have better support and work more smoothly, having been built to run KDE from the start.


What do you Sujest???

I've Only used Ubuntu versions, Fedora and Suse :S
Fire Boar
OpenSUSE is a very good option that innovates very well with KDE. Fedora works better with KDE than kubuntu. Mandriva is a great choice for KDE as well. Arch Linux's kdemod implementation could be worth giving a shot as well. Most other popular distros only really work with a basic KDE, similar to kubuntu.
noah
Load them all into a VM(Virtual Machine) and try them all!
Rajiev
WOW, I thought It cant be better thanKubuntu Surprised

Silly me
sourojit
Ubuntu is the simplest.I used it when I was new to linux.
There are no problems as such to me having a dual boot .Though removing Ubuntu later will cause the grub loader missing ,so you will be left with no oprating system.Just install the grub again from the Ubuntu cd.
During setting the ubuntu partition,do it manually,as i suffered first time using the automatic option,space larger than required was taken.So pre partitioning will be good.
Choose a mount point 1)root- main ubuntu 2)boot-optional though good practice to keep it(max 50mb) 3)swap- important(at least 1/3 of your ram).
You are ready to go then.
albuferque
In order to create a "unique" distribution, the many companies in this field look at how to arrange the various components of Linux in a specific manner, in order to solve a particular problem, or make an easier solution. Xubuntu was created for low end machines and it's a good choice for beginners.
Rajiev
Well, Have anyone of you used
Ubuntu 9.10
Kubuntu 9.10
Xubuntu 9.10
Edubuntu 9.10

I've Goth e CDs from Canonical andtried a Live Run. Can't wait to install them on my Lap. But my ongoing Degree project is keeping from installing Windows 7 and Ubuntu 9.10 Mad I dont want to change the OS in the middle and loose even a small .dll so my project wont run in the new environment :p

Another new thing I found out lately is the Small Distributions of Linux, especially Puppy Linux and Damn Small Linux. DSL is only good for diagnostic and live run versions, IMHO. But Puppy is really kool. I think Everyone should have Puppy installed or in a CD in their home. That Chuahua k9 is soooo Rocking Very Happy
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