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Ubuntu - Linux for human beings





Betboy
I want to know how many of you use ubuntu as your primary operating system.. Please leave a comment for your version of ubuntu if you do..

I personally use ubuntu because of financial reason.. I've got my ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) for a while, and it runs like a champ in my old laptop.. The updates are great, so are the community support.. Still waiting for the next update, ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope)..
MS should be ashamed to be nearly beaten by an opensource OS like this..
albuferque
I used to use Ubuntu 5.10, "Breezy". The initial dream of Mark Shuttleworth amazed many of my colleagues. However I've decided to go for BSD, since then I've left Ubuntu but keep on using RedHat Based Distributions at work. It seems that Ubuntu has all the attention now, specially for Desktop Linux.

Indeed, Ubuntu remains popular among the community, but some hinted at "as it evolves, Ubuntu gets slower" :

http://linux.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/10/27/1212214
Agent ME
albuferque wrote:
Indeed, Ubuntu remains popular among the community, but some hinted at "as it evolves, Ubuntu gets slower" :

http://linux.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/10/27/1212214

I've run the last few versions of Ubuntu (7.10 to 9.04), and users don't notice slowdowns that have to be benchmarked to be noticed. What they do notice is boot time and sudden pauses in the system or applications. And in this case, for me, each version has been getting better in having quicker boot time and fewer/no pauses (in my case, there seemed to have been some sort of problem with flash and/or my video driver in the past, but it seems fixed now).
(Not to say that developers shouldn't try to track down the statistical slowdowns that may have been added since the older versions. Just that it's not exactly a deal-breaker from the user perspective.)
Bannik
i lvoed ubuntu but i dont know if many agree but its an os which you have too LEARN too use....its very different from windows so no matter how easy and colorful it looks you gotta learn a whole new crap load of useless data...

if the system folders, installing games, cleaning the software etc was just a tad bit more simple you know less folders and come on the command line thing? who uses those any more...


i love linux and thats why i support google os (yay) but ubuntu needs too be simpler hence why i am back too using windows xp sp2.....smooth as a kitten...
microkosm
A couple years ago I began my linux experience with ubuntu. I had a new ATI card at that time and it refused to play nice without further tweaking. Of course I later learned it was problem with the xorg backend and poor driver support as opposed to the ubuntu os itself.

When most people first use ubuntu/linux they comment on how different it is from windows. Yes, they are different, but I would suggest that to the typical enduser they are much more similar than they are different. Especially, if you are using mainstream GUI's like gnome or KDE.

What is harder to come to terms with is the linux filesystem hierarchy (ie /usr /bin /tmp) but experience and reading will help you to understand these concepts. How many typical users actually understand the windows filesystem or registry?

I have long since moved on from ubuntu to arch linux which is a more "simple" linux distribution in that the user is expected to understand what they are doing. Most everything is text-based for utmost control. I realized that I needed to move on from ubuntu when I started tweaking everything and removing unnecessary software.

Quote:

if the system folders, installing games, cleaning the software etc was just a tad bit more simple you know less folders and come on the command line thing? who uses those any more...


For current games support you're better off with windows. If you mean removing orphan registry entries or disk defragmentation when you refer to "cleaning the software" then this is not typically necessary with linux. If you mean software management then you simply don't understand how package management works on linux. This is one of the areas where linux is superior to windows IMO. You seem to be confusing simplistic with simple. They are not the same. If you just "want it to work" then stay with what you already know. But ask yourself how you learned windows in the first place.
Agent ME
Games on Linux is kind of hit-or-miss. A lot of games I like (Quake 3, anything by iD), and flash games perfectly work fine, etc. However picking up an arbitrary recent game off of a shelve at a store is pretty likely to not work. If there isn't a linux version of the game, checking http://appdb.winehq.org/ is usually a good idea to see how well a windows game will run under linux.
chartcentral
Ubuntu works great for me. One not-so-great thing though is when I upgrade, it actually adds more options to the boot list instead of just updating the entries (I don't find any difference in selecting the new or old entries; I manually delete the older redundant entries and keep the new boot options).
Helios
Writing this post from Ubuntu.
I like it, I was a Debian (still am technically) for many years, but Ubuntu felt like a breakthrough for me. It's amazing, especially the eye-candy, which is so easy to install and configure.
I was one of those command-liners but hated it (GUIs ftw), and here comes Ubuntu! No more silly commands.
misterXY
Kubuntu, just had enough fixing the laptop issues HP DV2620ca with vista, got them hooked on it, and never have too keep fixing things. loveeeeeeee it
noah
I use xubuntu exclusively on the on desktop and laptops I own. I also use max OS X for personal computing. I use Windows XP and Windows 7 in my professional life.
scary
I've used Ubuntu for some time - well, I must say, even though Windows sux a lot - I missed it and got back to it after a while...
misterXY
scary wrote:
I've used Ubuntu for some time - well, I must say, even though Windows sux a lot - I missed it and got back to it after a while...

just dual boot?
leontius
I have used ubuntu for about a year - I like how I can play with symbolic links and how I can relate things on linux with web development (as most public hosting are based on linux). Discovering the power of the command line is also an enlightening experience.

There are some applications made exclusively for linux that I find very nice (even after considering their windows counterparts), like Gnome Do, Amarok 1.4, and Transmission. I did use the cross-platform apps on windows before (pidgin, firefox, inkscape etc.) so it's relatively easy to switch.
ThePolemistis
albuferque wrote:
I used to use Ubuntu 5.10, "Breezy". The initial dream of Mark Shuttleworth amazed many of my colleagues. However I've decided to go for BSD, since then I've left Ubuntu but keep on using RedHat Based Distributions at work. It seems that Ubuntu has all the attention now, specially for Desktop Linux.

Indeed, Ubuntu remains popular among the community, but some hinted at "as it evolves, Ubuntu gets slower" :

http://linux.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/10/27/1212214


was there a reason you left ubuntu in favour of BSD?
maaji
Very Good Operating system Great Lookk Smile
ocalhoun
ThePolemistis wrote:
albuferque wrote:
I used to use Ubuntu 5.10, "Breezy". The initial dream of Mark Shuttleworth amazed many of my colleagues. However I've decided to go for BSD, since then I've left Ubuntu but keep on using RedHat Based Distributions at work. It seems that Ubuntu has all the attention now, specially for Desktop Linux.

Indeed, Ubuntu remains popular among the community, but some hinted at "as it evolves, Ubuntu gets slower" :

http://linux.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/10/27/1212214


was there a reason you left ubuntu in favour of BSD?


Well, I can't speak for anyone else, but I dislike Ubuntu because it tries to be user friendly by leaving things out, while not reducing the real ease-of-use issues.

Examples:

Leaving stuff out: Doesn't create a root account when installing... what's up with that? Sure, it might confuse a few people, but it'll confuse even more when you tell them they have to create a root account in order to do something.

Not addressing the real issues: Personally, I find that you have to use the command line a LOT more often in Ubuntu than with other distros... And the hardware management/configuration tools are very lackluster for someone who's used to SuSE's YAST software.
noah
ocalhoun wrote:
ThePolemistis wrote:
albuferque wrote:
I used to use Ubuntu 5.10, "Breezy". The initial dream of Mark Shuttleworth amazed many of my colleagues. However I've decided to go for BSD, since then I've left Ubuntu but keep on using RedHat Based Distributions at work. It seems that Ubuntu has all the attention now, specially for Desktop Linux.

Indeed, Ubuntu remains popular among the community, but some hinted at "as it evolves, Ubuntu gets slower" :

http://linux.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/10/27/1212214


was there a reason you left ubuntu in favour of BSD?


Well, I can't speak for anyone else, but I dislike Ubuntu because it tries to be user friendly by leaving things out, while not reducing the real ease-of-use issues.

Examples:

Leaving stuff out: Doesn't create a root account when installing... what's up with that? Sure, it might confuse a few people, but it'll confuse even more when you tell them they have to create a root account in order to do something.

Not addressing the real issues: Personally, I find that you have to use the command line a LOT more often in Ubuntu than with other distros... And the hardware management/configuration tools are very lackluster for someone who's used to SuSE's YAST software.



You should read up on SUDO, it's not that they left the root account out. You can login as root from GRUB, it's a security feature, and one that works quite well!
ocalhoun
noah wrote:



You should read up on SUDO, it's not that they left the root account out. You can login as root from GRUB, it's a security feature, and one that works quite well!

Tried that...
Result:
Quote:

Enter root password:

But, what is it? There is no root password because it was never set up.

There needs to be a root account set up in order to run things as root, and when I tried Ubuntu, I couldn't get anything important done until I created the root account manually.
Fire Boar
Perhaps that was a very old version of ubuntu?

Linux always has a super user: "root". In ubuntu, the root password is scrambled, BUT the first user to be created has an entry in the /etc/sudoers file giving them full access. So, when using the sudo command, it asks you to enter your password - this is your regular password and is used purely to verify that the person sitting at the computer is the person who logged in, and not someone who's borrowing it for a bit (with or without permission).

You can also use sudo su to "become" root. And if that's a pain to do every time... what's stopping you from doing sudo passwd to change the root password to something that you know?
ocalhoun
Fire Boar wrote:
it asks you to enter your password - this is your regular password

Hm, did that too... Didn't work for me...

Anyway, I still much prefer the normal way of creating the real root account first, during installation, and then creating user accounts (also during installation). (All without ever having to touch the command line, of course.)
misterXY
ocalhoun wrote:
Fire Boar wrote:
it asks you to enter your password - this is your regular password

Hm, did that too... Didn't work for me...

Anyway, I still much prefer the normal way of creating the real root account first, during installation, and then creating user accounts (also during installation). (All without ever having to touch the command line, of course.)

what distro are u using?
SonLight
I have been running Ubuntu 9.04 for a while now. It boots up faster than their older releases, and tyey have reduced the need to use the command line for maintenance.

Ocalhoun, I don't know why you had so much trouble with the sudo mechanism. I find it more convenient than logging in as root. If I want to do several commands as root, I do a "sudo -i" command which gives me a regular root terminal, either within x windows or a pseudo terminal.

It is possible to mess up the sudoers file so that no one can use sudo. I would suggest you at least try to see how sudo is supposed to work the next time you do a new install.
ocalhoun
misterXY wrote:
ocalhoun wrote:
Fire Boar wrote:
it asks you to enter your password - this is your regular password

Hm, did that too... Didn't work for me...

Anyway, I still much prefer the normal way of creating the real root account first, during installation, and then creating user accounts (also during installation). (All without ever having to touch the command line, of course.)

what distro are u using?

^.^ I'm not using it anymore.
Open SuSE works great, and fits my preferences much better.
Tphilakone
I dont know why ubuntu is not support media code for my pc ? Now im waiting for ubuntu 8.10 i have been regusted cd rom
Fire Boar
SonLight wrote:
I have been running Ubuntu 9.04 for a while now. It boots up faster than their older releases, and tyey have reduced the need to use the command line for maintenance.

Ocalhoun, I don't know why you had so much trouble with the sudo mechanism. I find it more convenient than logging in as root. If I want to do several commands as root, I do a "sudo -i" command which gives me a regular root terminal, either within x windows or a pseudo terminal.

It is possible to mess up the sudoers file so that no one can use sudo. I would suggest you at least try to see how sudo is supposed to work the next time you do a new install.


That's why you should use visudo to edit it: this command copies the /etc/sudoers file to a temporary location, opens it with $EDITOR and then after you exit the editor it checks the file to see if it's valid. You could still mess it up, but it is possible with local access to edit the root password using boot options.
JBotAlan
I have to laugh at where this thread went. It is titled "Linux for human beings"...and the discussion took off in the direction of editing the sudoers file and the presence of root accounts and such. Good job at showing off the superiority of Ubuntu, guys!

That aside, I am a full-time Ubuntu user. I am currently using Jaunty. There are a few annoyances that would block the average user from replacing Windows, at least on the hardware I'm on. I am affected by the Intel driver regression, but since I don't do much that is super intensive graphically, I don't really care. I am also affected by a regression in PulseAudio or ALSA...not really sure. However, I have seen it pop up in the form of crackling where a song should be, usually under heavy processor load. Also, Flash is wayy more processor-intensive than its Windows counterpart. Aside from those gripes, I really do find it to be a superior OS for my needs. Then again, I'm a geek. I do hope to see Ubuntu (or some flavor of Linux) permeate the desktop industry soon, but it needs to be polished before this can happen.

I have to say, I really like having a boot time of less than a minute right out of the box. I also love the package management system...updating every piece of software on my machine with a single command really rocks!
Agent ME
chartcentral wrote:
Ubuntu works great for me. One not-so-great thing though is when I upgrade, it actually adds more options to the boot list instead of just updating the entries (I don't find any difference in selecting the new or old entries; I manually delete the older redundant entries and keep the new boot options).

Ubuntu by default keeps all of the installed kernel versions listed in the boot menu. You can set the boot menu to not display automatically (press ESC to show on boot) or set it to not to keep older entries in.
Use "sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst" to edit the grub menu file. Adding the line "hiddenmenu" will do the first option.
To eliminate old entries, change the line "# howmany=ALL" to "# howmany=1". Then run "sudo update-grub".

ocalhoun wrote:
Leaving stuff out: Doesn't create a root account when installing... what's up with that? Sure, it might confuse a few people, but it'll confuse even more when you tell them they have to create a root account in order to do something.

I've never needed a root account. You just preface whatever command that needs privileges with "sudo". If you really needed to do a few things as root or explore restricted directories, "sudo su" will create a root session.
Ankhanu
I had been running version 4 a couple years back as my main desktop OS after having some problems with XP on the system (that wouldn't go away with reinstalls and all the other fixes I could think of), and it was fantastic. I only stopped using it when we got a new computer with (eugh) Vista on it. I then cleared Ubuntu off of the old hardware and installed Debian, setting it up to run as a webserver.

Last night I downloaded the current version of Ubuntu to install on a laptop with a broken screen that I acquired that I intend to set up as a logmein server and leave in a closet to access remotely. I'll let you know what I think of 9.04 when I have it goin.
Fire Boar
JBotAlan wrote:
I have to laugh at where this thread went. It is titled "Linux for human beings"...and the discussion took off in the direction of editing the sudoers file and the presence of root accounts and such. Good job at showing off the superiority of Ubuntu, guys!

That aside, I am a full-time Ubuntu user. I am currently using Jaunty. There are a few annoyances that would block the average user from replacing Windows, at least on the hardware I'm on. I am affected by the Intel driver regression, but since I don't do much that is super intensive graphically, I don't really care. I am also affected by a regression in PulseAudio or ALSA...not really sure. However, I have seen it pop up in the form of crackling where a song should be, usually under heavy processor load. Also, Flash is wayy more processor-intensive than its Windows counterpart. Aside from those gripes, I really do find it to be a superior OS for my needs. Then again, I'm a geek. I do hope to see Ubuntu (or some flavor of Linux) permeate the desktop industry soon, but it needs to be polished before this can happen.

I have to say, I really like having a boot time of less than a minute right out of the box. I also love the package management system...updating every piece of software on my machine with a single command really rocks!


Good point! And hey, that reminds me...


http://xkcd.com/619/
Agent ME
Fire Boar wrote:
Good point! And hey, that reminds me...


http://xkcd.com/619/

Never really liked that specific comic, because people working on Linux have about nothing to do with how well Flash works (besides maybe a bit of Compiz-compatibility). That's all Adobe.

I'm just glad for HTML5 with the ability to play videos, without Flash or other proprietary plugins. If something goes wrong with HTML5 videos, you can blame the people at Mozilla and even patch the code yourself. With Flash, you have to wait for Adobe to decide your platform is worth the effort of a working version and hope they get it right.
Fire Boar
Agent ME wrote:
Never really liked that specific comic, because people working on Linux have about nothing to do with how well Flash works (besides maybe a bit of Compiz-compatibility). That's all Adobe.

I'm just glad for HTML5 with the ability to play videos, without Flash or other proprietary plugins. If something goes wrong with HTML5 videos, you can blame the people at Mozilla and even patch the code yourself. With Flash, you have to wait for Adobe to decide your platform is worth the effort of a working version and hope they get it right.


True that... the comic is more pointing out the irony than fussing over specific details though. But what you say is perfectly true of course: kernel developers and Flash developers are totally unrelated.
charlesbeat
Hi........I want to analys linux os.....friends any one have or know the web site to download any linux os source code.
Ankhanu
You can generally get the source code for any open source offering directly from the providers of the product.
SonLight
charlesbeat wrote:
hi........charles studying mca i want to analys linux os.....friends any one have or know the web site to download any linux os source code please tell me through the email id... ***...


You would probably want to run the OS on a computer first if you want to study it. Installing the OS will give you a platform to test any changes you want to try out, and the distributor of the OS is required by the terms of the license to make the exact source code used for that version available to you.

For example, I run Ubuntu 9.04. To get access to source code, I run the "software sources" program from the administration menu, and tick the "source code" box on the "ubuntu software" tab. After that, I can download any source code used in the OS with either the "synaptic package manager" or using the apt-get program from a command line window.

What sources exactly are you interested in? The guts of the OS is the Linux kernel, and that's where you probably want to start if you are interested in how an OS is written. Other essential packages are available by installing build-essentials, which is a dummy package. Installing it forces installation of the C compiler (gcc) plus many other utility programs which are necessary to create new programs from source code.

Let us know your interests. There may be enough of us here interested in programming to justify a discussion about the Linux kernel and some of its relatives.

By the way, I would recommend you edit your post to remove your email address. Forum members can reach you by PM, if you allow it in your account preferences. If you leave your email address online, you might get lots of spam emails.
shuust
Im using ubuntu and I want to check gentoo
this is peaple sad most be very fast pinguin.
misterXY
l've actually switched too Linux Mint Helena, Gnome
Still ubuntu with the drivers.. it's nice but my machine is a little slower, so l installed XFCE, session out, very simplistic/fast/has everything you'd need (Flash, etc..)
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