FRIHOST FORUMS SEARCH FAQ TOS BLOGS COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Intergalactic space travel





chasbeen
It's hard to believe that the ORIGINAL start trek was filmed at the end of the 60's and that was also the same time as Men strolling around the dusty lunar surface.

Intergalactic space travel was more than notional then because of fiction / fact time period.

Are we any closer to making Intergalactic space travel a reality?

Scientists? Arrow
Bikerman
Not really.
The problem is the distances - they are HUGE.
Our current technology is rocket driven and this will never allow us to move beyond the solar system. Other proposed technologies (solar sails, nuclear engines etc) might provide an answer, but not soon.
Think of it this way - the edge of our own solar system is over a light year 'out' from Earth. The fastest things we have in space are the Voyager spacecraft - currently travelling at around 40,000 mph.
If you do the sums you will find that, at this speed, it will take about 17,000 years to reach the edge of the solar system. That only gets you a little way into our own galaxy - when you come to consider other galaxies then the distances are truly staggering and WAY beyond anything we can currently build (or even imagine).
ocalhoun
Well, generation ships are one answer to interplanetary travel, even using primitive technology. If your culture takes the extreme long-term view of things, there's no problem with launching off in a ship that you (and your descendants) will live on for thousands of years until it reaches it's destination. It takes a certain mindset to only care that your distant descendants will ever see your destination, but it's not unthinkable.

Intergalactic though... that's as far above interplanetary as interplanetary travel is above simply getting to the moon. If you were to take the same approach for that you'd have to take a whole star system with you, at least.
Bikerman
Generational ships do, at first sight, provide an answer. Not on closer examination though.
a) There would have to be some major shielding to cope with cosmic rays and other radiation. This would contribute a huge amount to the mass of the spaceship and, with currently technology, make it so massive that it would be impractical.
b) The cumulative effect of zero-g on the physiology means that you would need some form of artificial gravity. The simplest way would be to 'spin' the spaceship but I don't know how you would go about that for a spaceship of sufficient size to support generations of people - I suspect that the engineering and logistical problems would be HUGE.
c) The psychology and sociology of such a grouping of people is tricky - you would need social engineering on a scale never thought about before in order to provide an environment which prevented the crew going stir-crazy very quickly....
ocalhoun
^Yeah, I'm thinking more on the terms of a hollowed-out large asteroid or small moon rather than a conventional spaceship. (Though a conventional spaceship could be conceived that would fulfill the purposes.)

The huge mass would be a problem, but the main effect of that would be just to make the journey longer (it might be a few generations before the 'ship' even got up to speed), and what's the fundamental difference between setting out on a 40,000 year journey as opposed to a 80,000 year journey? (Especially when the longer one has better chances of success and could probably get started sooner...)
classicevony
The best hope for travelling long distances is:

Cryogenic freezing: if we can be frozen then we can be kept in a revivable state for a long time.

Special relativistic effects: If we can get close to the speed of light then space will compress and we will be able to cover vast distances in no time at all, however, those not travelling with you will experience no compression and will therefore see that time slows down for you, they will age normally. Ergo, when u get back your family will be dead 1000's of years ago even though u kissed your wife goodbye the day before.

Wormholes: My personal fave. Imagine a flat sheet of paper, you put two dots oon it, one on either end. What is the shortest way between the dots? if you said a straight line then you are wrong! Fold the paper so that the dots are touching and the two points can exist in the same space! You fold space in half, much like you would fold the piece of paper! NICE! No time dialation, no dead family!

Peace
chiragpatnaik
classicevony wrote:
The best hope for travelling long distances is:

Cryogenic freezing: if we can be frozen then we can be kept in a revivable state for a long time.

Special relativistic effects: If we can get close to the speed of light then space will compress and we will be able to cover vast distances in no time at all, however, those not travelling with you will experience no compression and will therefore see that time slows down for you, they will age normally. Ergo, when u get back your family will be dead 1000's of years ago even though u kissed your wife goodbye the day before.

Wormholes: My personal fave. Imagine a flat sheet of paper, you put two dots oon it, one on either end. What is the shortest way between the dots? if you said a straight line then you are wrong! Fold the paper so that the dots are touching and the two points can exist in the same space! You fold space in half, much like you would fold the piece of paper! NICE! No time dialation, no dead family!

Peace


I would go with Worm holes as well. The question (as always) is how do you bend space time. If at all possible.

Somehow (and this is purely my opinion) I don't think it will be impossible. A principle is waiting to be found. I suppose someone really bright will come up with the solution. It maybe a few hundred years (or some decades).

Look at airplanes, an impossibility a couple of centuries ago. Now so mundane, that you don't even lookup to watch a plane go by.
Neilos
The bending of space-time is a common everyday thing, but it is more of a reverse type stretching (I'll explain).

To 'bend' space-time you only need something with mass. You, me, the planet..... a black hole!

The bending of space-time is similar to when you put a marble in a stretched out cloth. Initially the cloth is flat, but when you put the marble on it the marble creates a divit. things caught in the slope of the divit are pulled towards the marble. if they have a fastenough speed away from the marble they can skip into the divit, change cource slightly, then carry on in a straight line. Object with not enough speed (really it is momentum) will fall into the marble and hit it. Objects with just the right speed and direction will orbit that marble!

This is how general relativity shows that gravity works. Particals with mass 'bend' the space-time fabric. This is why time is affected by gravity. Because the spacetime is affected near a body with mass, time will move slower for you when observed by an outside observer in space (however you will not notice the effect, you will think that time is going faster for the guy on the ship).

I think that i got the faster/sl;ower time things the right way round in the last bit! lol.

Ok. So... Near a black hole the gravity is immense, so immense in fact that at the event horrizon it is stretched to infinity, this is why you can never actually fall into a black hole, cos time is stretched to infinity (time ceases to exist at the event horizon of a black hole). So maybe if you can somehow harness a black hole or even get inside it, maybe you can controll this bending of space time. Hence forth create a wormhole.

Ok about the 'bending' of space time and how it is more like a reverse stretching. Maybe a better way to describe it would be to think of air density. In no gravity you have the normal density of air (this is just an abstract way of thinking of it, I'm not actually postulating about air density!) air representing the density of space, as you get closer to a gravitational field the baloon is stretched (kinda) and the air inside is less dense. there is still the same ammount of air (or the same ammount of space in this case) but it occupies a larger area. HOWEVER!!! The baloon idea is silly cos when you get closer to gravity the same space actually occupies less space, as if it were being compressed. But the density gets lower as the space is more compressed. lol it's a hard concept to grasp if you don't understand it already.

No baloons were harmed in this experiment.

I'll try describe it better. The reason for the space density idea is that on the 2D cloth idea you can only see space 'bending' in 3D so the 2D modle is insufficient. In a 3D model it is harder to visualise. Space is 'stretched' as seen in the cloth idea, but it still occupies the same area as observed from an outside observer. It's really difficult to understand in 3D, this is why the 2D model is used a lot to describe it and why u see 2D square grids being distorded by 3D objects when u watch programs about it on the TV!

I hope this describes it quite well, my brain hurts lol!

Neilos
Related topics
Radiation Ring Round Earth Stopping Space Travel
Space Travel...
Do you believe in Aliens ?
Should marijuana be legal?
Space, Time, and all that mumbo jumbo
Quantum Star- The FREE online space strategy game
Is The Universe Finite?
Is the moon made out of cheese?
How to become a millionaire on the internet?
Aye, Scotty!!
Anyone like "Dune"
Facts about India : Proud to be an Indian
Aliens - Myth or reality?
Beam weapons, a new way of warfare?
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Science -> General Science

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.