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Young Programmers apparently ignored? :(





Raidation
Have any of you noticed, but young programmers (that is, children that program), are often ignored. What I mean by ignored, is that when they subscribe to a forum or something to discuss programming, if they reveal that they are children, then people just no longer to bother looking at their posts.

Alright, a social experiment:

Assume I am 13 years old.
Say whatever you want to me, but only if it relates to my (assumed) age.
Vrythramax
If I encountered that kind of problem online I simply wouldn't let anyone know how old I was in the first place. Adults generally think they know better than young people due to the amount of life experience they have that young people simply can't posess due to the fact they ARE young.

This is not to say they should be ignored, there have been many prodigy's (sp.?) in history, but they were also met with much doubt, disbelief, and at times outright hate (especially when they proved themselves right). Mozart comes to mind right away, even after he proved himself to be much more talented than most of the others of his time (before and since as well), he was dogged at every turn by people who were just plain jealous of his abilities.

If you are indeed a young programmer working via the Internet...chose your words carefully to make yourself seem older, make yourself outshine those around you...and don't volunteer your age.
joe_042293
Vrythramax wrote:
prodigy's (sp.?)


Prodigies.

And I agree with Vrythramax; if you're a young programmer, don't tell anyone your age. As long as nobody can tell, you won't get ignored. Heck, that applies to all chilluns on the interwebs.
ocalhoun
Perhaps less so in open source work...
I was reading some of the documentation for the Anjuta IDE once, and at the end of it found that the writer of that documentation (and presumably closely involved with the programming of it) was only 11.
deanhills
Raidation wrote:
Have any of you noticed, but young programmers (that is, children that program), are often ignored. What I mean by ignored, is that when they subscribe to a forum or something to discuss programming, if they reveal that they are children, then people just no longer to bother looking at their posts.

Alright, a social experiment:

Assume I am 13 years old.
Say whatever you want to me, but only if it relates to my (assumed) age.
There are quite a few young Frihosters around that age posting in the Forums, and I thought they generally brought a nice breath of fresh air to the discussions. They did not act as though they were being repressed because of their age and have always been bold in their discussions. They were very open about their age as well and it has never been an issue before. Not as far as I can see anyway. I have not been posting in the programming forums and have little experience with programmers, but am sure that if they are good programmers they would be taken seriously, and if they were ignored, it would be because of the programming/discussion about programming and not the age.
Raidation
Well, I am a member in this other forum.

Members there seem to think that children that program are "noobs". It gets a little annoying when we figure out that if we are "noobs" then we can't program well. This is very controversial, since I've worked with one other person, who does not know my age, and calls me his best programmer. Rolling Eyes

There is another member on the forum, who states openly that he is in elementary school. Nobody ever seems to bother with his posts.
FrightKnight
Never had that problem answering a question from a child who's willing to learn how to program.
deanhills
Raidation wrote:
Well, I am a member in this other forum.

Members there seem to think that children that program are "noobs". It gets a little annoying when we figure out that if we are "noobs" then we can't program well. This is very controversial, since I've worked with one other person, who does not know my age, and calls me his best programmer. Rolling Eyes

There is another member on the forum, who states openly that he is in elementary school. Nobody ever seems to bother with his posts.
I "get ignored" as well from time to time, and when I do, I assume it is not personal. What I had to say was not of that interest, OR someone else had something to say that was of greater interest OR people just did not have any comment to give on what I had to say. It's not personal. The total discussion means more than the individual parts as it is a forum discussion. Maybe what you had to say was not of interest, or not really relevant. But if you felt it was, maybe you need to find another forum where you feel more comfortable. Perhaps it would be good to keep it impersonal by giving as little information about yourself as you can so that you can focus on the subject of discussion. If people do not comment on what you have to say, just shrug it off.
Agent ME
Generally I've noticed that the people who are quick to point out their young age are often pretty immature. As the more mature ones say their age less often, it makes it appear that all younger coders / internet peoples are immature.
saratdear
I've not had that problem here or anywhere else, but there is something else; whenever you see somebody posting immature stuff, there is a tendency to say "what are you, 13?" or calling somebody a bunch of "13 yr old noobs" just because they said something supposedly stupid. I am sure I am not the only person who has seen that. This means that people correlate immature stuff with 13 year old or younger people. Having been a 13 year old in a not so distant past, I can safely say that although we may have lesser life experience, it is not to be assumed that we'll post something stupid.
ocalhoun
saratdear wrote:
I can safely say that although we may have lesser life experience, it is not to be assumed that we'll post something stupid.

It is much more likely though, you must admit.

The real problem is not age, but experience.

Some old people have little experience, but most have a lot.
Likewise, some young people have a lot of experience, but most do not. Stereotyping that all young people have little experience is unfair to the ones that do though.
deanhills
saratdear wrote:
I can safely say that although we may have lesser life experience, it is not to be assumed that we'll post something stupid.
I agree totally. Older people also tend to be more cynical and because they are more cynical and have less faith, they miss out on a lot of things, whereas younger people with lots of faith and self conviction may see things from a fresher angle. Older people may be more glib. For me the percentage of people young vs old saying silly things could be equal.
Vrythramax
deanhills wrote:
...For me the percentage of people young vs old saying silly things could be equal.


Oh I agree totally! Neither age group has a lock on stupidity. I think the percentages of those who speak, or act, without thinking is about the same for both groups.

Age and experience can often go hand in hand...but wisdom can escape us all at times. Strictly speaking for the older members of this crowd (to which I am one), "Age and treachery will always overcome youth and skill". Razz
saratdear
ocalhoun wrote:
saratdear wrote:
I can safely say that although we may have lesser life experience, it is not to be assumed that we'll post something stupid.

It is much more likely though, you must admit.

The real problem is not age, but experience.

Some old people have little experience, but most have a lot.
Likewise, some young people have a lot of experience, but most do not. Stereotyping that all young people have little experience is unfair to the ones that do though.


OK, how about we look at what we call as "stupid". Would you call a young kid stupid if he posted something which is commendable considering his age and experience, but which doesn't match up at all to someone who is much older, and has much more experience than the young guy. Or would you call him stupid if he has a complex and posts things of standard far below his age? I am sure it would be the latter.

deanhills wrote:
saratdear wrote:
I can safely say that although we may have lesser life experience, it is not to be assumed that we'll post something stupid.

I agree totally. Older people also tend to be more cynical and because they are more cynical and have less faith, they miss out on a lot of things, whereas younger people with lots of faith and self conviction may see things from a fresher angle. Older people may be more glib. For me the percentage of people young vs old saying silly things could be equal.


Agreed. I think that in a forum like this, where people do not actually converse face to face, the emphasis should be more on what they say, rather than their age.
Raidation
Quote:
Would you call a young kid stupid if he posted something which is commendable considering his age and experience, but which doesn't match up at all to someone who is much older, and has much more experience than the young guy. Or would you call him stupid if he has a complex and posts things of standard far below his age? I am sure it would be the latter.


You're right. However, forums are different. Young people are automatically placed in the category "noobs" because the less mature ones have little or no experience. This stereotype is very unfair to the more experienced young people.


Quote:
tend to be more cynical and because they are more cynical


[sarcasm]Are you sure?[/sarcasm] Rolling Eyes
Vrythramax
Raidation wrote:
You're right. However, forums are different. Young people are automatically placed in the category "noobs" because the less mature ones have little or no experience. This stereotype is very unfair to the more experienced young people.


I think you may be over-reacting there just a bit, I use the word "noob" in my sig and it means a "newbie", that has nothing what-so-ever to do with ones age and everything to do with ones newfound computer skills.

Are you sure your not being just a bit paranoid? Rolling Eyes
saratdear
Raidation wrote:
Quote:
Would you call a young kid stupid if he posted something which is commendable considering his age and experience, but which doesn't match up at all to someone who is much older, and has much more experience than the young guy. Or would you call him stupid if he has a complex and posts things of standard far below his age? I am sure it would be the latter.


You're right. However, forums are different. Young people are automatically placed in the category "noobs" because the less mature ones have little or no experience. This stereotype is very unfair to the more experienced young people.


I think Vrythramax is right here, being a noob, in the computer sense has nothing to do with age. However, there is one more thing. I think that people who started programming (or any other computer skill, for that matter) at a slightly older age (say, 25 or so) and gained more experience ARE more likely to call a 13 year old as a noob, rather than someone who started much younger, say 14.

Nothing personal at anybody, this is just what I feel.
Raidation
Okay. I admit. I wasn't being clear there. The word "noob" isn't in my normal vocabulary.

What I meant was, considerably older people would call younger people "very inexperienced" because they automatically think they are much more experienced than them.
deanhills
saratdear wrote:
I think that people who started programming (or any other computer skill, for that matter) at a slightly older age (say, 25 or so) and gained more experience ARE more likely to call a 13 year old as a noob, rather than someone who started much younger, say 14.
Agreed in principle in a general sense. The older we get the more attitude we may have especially in our twenties Smile But that does of course depend on the person concerned. You may find someone who is 13 years old who may be arrogant to call a 25 year old a noob, after catching the 25 year old out on his/her absence of prior knowledge. In reverse, the 25 year old could also be the kind of person who would have absolute admiration for anyone who is 13 years old and working on programming. And would as a consequence be very patient in his/her dealings with the 13 years old, even if he/she (the 13 year old) should be arrogant in the process, unless the 13-year old in question is really a noob with an attitude and needs to either be ignored or firmly dealt with.

saratdear wrote:
OK, how about we look at what we call as "stupid". Would you call a young kid stupid if he posted something which is commendable considering his age and experience, but which doesn't match up at all to someone who is much older, and has much more experience than the young guy. Or would you call him stupid if he has a complex and posts things of standard far below his age? I am sure it would be the latter.
I would rather not call him anything at all and make it impersonal by focussing on the subject matter, unless he should say something really silly in order to provoke others, which possibly will fall under your last example. It could be someone who does have a complex (as you mentioned) and may need some attitude adjustment and would either be ignored or firmly handled as a consequence.
saratdear
deanhills wrote:
saratdear wrote:
I think that people who started programming (or any other computer skill, for that matter) at a slightly older age (say, 25 or so) and gained more experience ARE more likely to call a 13 year old as a noob, rather than someone who started much younger, say 14.
Agreed in principle in a general sense. The older we get the more attitude we may have especially in our twenties Smile But that does of course depend on the person concerned. You may find someone who is 13 years old who may be arrogant to call a 25 year old a noob, after catching the 25 year old out on his/her absence of prior knowledge. In reverse, the 25 year old could also be the kind of person who would have absolute admiration for anyone who is 13 years old and working on programming. And would as a consequence be very patient in his/her dealings with the 13 years old, even if he/she (the 13 year old) should be arrogant in the process, unless the 13-year old in question is really a noob with an attitude and needs to either be ignored or firmly dealt with.

Agreed, arrogance and the attitude of the person is the key thing here. Razz

Another one question : Does anybody think that younger people who have more knowledge than adults appear arrogant in their conversation? (Like deanhills' first example?)

Its a small thing, but in the teenage-parent quarrels that I sometimes have, I seem to receive a lot of "don't be arrogant to your elders" type of stuff, even when I am sure I have not been.
deanhills
saratdear wrote:
deanhills wrote:
saratdear wrote:
I think that people who started programming (or any other computer skill, for that matter) at a slightly older age (say, 25 or so) and gained more experience ARE more likely to call a 13 year old as a noob, rather than someone who started much younger, say 14.
Agreed in principle in a general sense. The older we get the more attitude we may have especially in our twenties Smile But that does of course depend on the person concerned. You may find someone who is 13 years old who may be arrogant to call a 25 year old a noob, after catching the 25 year old out on his/her absence of prior knowledge. In reverse, the 25 year old could also be the kind of person who would have absolute admiration for anyone who is 13 years old and working on programming. And would as a consequence be very patient in his/her dealings with the 13 years old, even if he/she (the 13 year old) should be arrogant in the process, unless the 13-year old in question is really a noob with an attitude and needs to either be ignored or firmly dealt with.

Agreed, arrogance and the attitude of the person is the key thing here. Razz

Another one question : Does anybody think that younger people who have more knowledge than adults appear arrogant in their conversation? (Like deanhills' first example?)

Its a small thing, but in the teenage-parent quarrels that I sometimes have, I seem to receive a lot of "don't be arrogant to your elders" type of stuff, even when I am sure I have not been.
Parents probably need to get used to their children growing up and not only having opinions of their own, but also opinions that are different and sometimes better. In essence they need to grow up too. The "difficult teenage years" phenomenon is usually a two-way street of huge adjustments that need to be made on both sides. Some teenagers go through really huge adjustments in the form of rebelling, others are OK but their parents aren't In the end however (most of the time) it all works out. Amazing, the more struggles, potentially the greater the bond as the struggles sometimes seem to happen between those in the family who are the closest to one another without being aware of it.
Vrythramax
I can only speak for myself, but I admire skill no matter where or who it comes from. I have been working in the computer field for what some would consider a long time, and I have seen sooo many people who brag about what they can do, and when it comes down to it they can't do very much. This goes for older and younger people, male and female.

Part of my current job is to interview, and to hire new staff, I wouldn't hesitate for a minute to hire a young person...IF they could prove their skills, and are old enough to work full-time. In the U.S. that is a big consideration, we have very strict "child" labor laws. Now don't flame me for saying "child", it's not my choice of words, it's what the laws are called here.

I have to agree that many older people will think a younger person arrogant if they show too much confidence in their abilities, it's not right, but they still do it. On the other hand, how many younger people think it perfectly alright to tell an older person "maybe that's how they did in the old days grandpa, we do it different now", or other statements to the same effect. Is that not arrogance? Diplomacy is a hard earned skill in itself, sometimes skill isn't all that's required in the work place. The ability to deal with people in the workplace is also a skill, someone who hasn't had very many jobs can't lay claim to have a lot of experience in that area.

It doesn't matter if your the best at what you do sometimes, if your lousy when dealing with customers.
airh3ad
he / she maybe no experience at all and i noticed better to hired senior than young programmer.we say that is descrimanation.
deanhills
If there is a choice between a young programmer and a more mature programmer, and the younger programmer has more skills, but a very arrogant attitude, and the more mature programmer perhaps less skills but a mature attitude, then I would be inclined to hire the mature programmer, as the younger programmer may not last that long, as well as may disrupt the work flow where team playing is obviously important.
Ghost Rider103
I think a lot of it has to do with first impressions.

If I see a young programmer acting very immature, and I know that he is a young programmer then I will more than likely avoid him. But I have the same feelings for an older programmer. If your an older programmer, yet you are still very immature, whether your skills are mild or amazing, I will still avoid you as much as possible.

However if you just up and out say your age on one of your very first post, you might get a few people who avoid you. This is probably because if you are younger, then you probably won't be seen as a very good and dedicated worker. Most young programmers have a dedication problem, and that is a very big issue in the business.

If you don't 100% need to reveal your age, then there is no need to.

I have a very successful graphic and web design business going and I drive a brand new Mustang. Some of you have known me for a few years on Frihost, and even off Frihost on IRC and MSN, yet most of you will probably never come close to guessing my age.
Vrythramax
Ghost Rider103 wrote:
Some of you have known me for a few years on Frihost, and even off Frihost on IRC and MSN, yet most of you will probably never come close to guessing my age.


Yep...I know you. I'm still using the graphics you made for me eons ago. Cool
deanhills
Vrythramax wrote:
Ghost Rider103 wrote:
Some of you have known me for a few years on Frihost, and even off Frihost on IRC and MSN, yet most of you will probably never come close to guessing my age.


Yep...I know you. I'm still using the graphics you made for me eons ago. Cool
So I guess he is older now. Since Frihost is 4 years old, I would take a guess of Ghost Rider being 15-17 years? Smile My experience with his postings, without knowing his age, was that of someone who is very mature, possibly in his (or her?) mid to late twenties. Excellent example Smile
guissmo
My personal opinion is that people generally think that most 12 to 14 year olds are just into MySpace and online gaming and being immature. And because of this reputation, no one takes them seriously.
erlendhg
If I met a younger programmer on a forum, I would think quite opposite - that it is nice to share experience with people that are not as old as you, given that they are not better than one self, of course.

But then, I am quite young myself Razz
deanhills
erlendhg wrote:
If I met a younger programmer on a forum, I would think quite opposite - that it is nice to share experience with people that are not as old as you, given that they are not better than one self, of course.

But then, I am quite young myself Razz
I feel exactly the same. We've had some really good posters. I remember a thread in the Politics Forum discussing whether teens should be allowed to vote, and there were some very good discussions then. This was the thread:
http://www.frihost.com/forums/vt-94144.html
soljarag
I think young people often lose intrest in subjects so it can be fustrating when it goes to trying to help them. This happends alot when it comes to 3D graphics..

I am signed onto a 3d graphics chatroom basically 24/7 and I can't even remember the countless times when a young person comes in there and says he wants to learn 3D graphics.... So I always try to help them, spending HOURS answering questions, showing them stuff... then about 95% of the time, I never see them again after about 4-5 days

So I basically wasted all that time on someone who will never use it again...


I still try to help people when they come in the chatroom, but when they start asking BASIC questions, that could be answered by READING THE MANUAL or by exploring the program, I just ignore them
Vrythramax
erlendhg wrote:
...But then, I am quite young myself Razz


WOW...what a coincidence, so am I!!! Very Happy
LostOverThere
I remember something quite similar. A few years ago when I used to regularly play Tremulous, a friend and I found out that the game mod who often was online whilst we were playing was a mere 13 years of age. Until that time I had naturally assumed he was in his early 20's or so, just due to the level of maturity he showed.

Regretfully, I took the opportunity to make fun and ridicule him. Something I sincerely wish I had never done.

Well, I guess we live and learn.
Dean_The_Great
Keep your age a secret and do what you want! That way people will take your words for what they are, and they will determine the reaction you get (as will whatever it is you program)
Vrythramax
Dean_The_Great wrote:
Keep your age a secret and do what you want! That way people will take your words for what they are, and they will determine the reaction you get (as will whatever it is you program)


So true! I saw a comic once with 2 dogs, one was sitting at (presumably) his master's keyboard and was telling the other dog.."The nice thing about the Internet is no one knows your a dog".

You can come across as old as you wish if you can phrase your words properly.
guth75
Believe me, I was always on my laptop when I was 11, and I have gotten banned from almost every website just because of my age, then I was made fun of, and just plain hated most people on those websites. I was ALWAYS ignored, I wasn't causing any trouble, and most people were surprised to see that I was 11, as I had a pretty good vocabulary and great spelling, so I thinks that they were being rude, in a sort of racist way.
saratdear
guth75 wrote:
Believe me, I was always on my laptop when I was 11, and I have gotten banned from almost every website just because of my age, then I was made fun of, and just plain hated most people on those websites. I was ALWAYS ignored, I wasn't causing any trouble, and most people were surprised to see that I was 11, as I had a pretty good vocabulary and great spelling, so I thinks that they were being rude, in a sort of racist way.


That's unfortunate. But perhaps the reason you got banned from the websites is solely because of your age (you know, many forums require you to be 13 for you to register for an account?)
deanhills
guth75 wrote:
Believe me, I was always on my laptop when I was 11, and I have gotten banned from almost every website just because of my age, then I was made fun of, and just plain hated most people on those websites. I was ALWAYS ignored, I wasn't causing any trouble, and most people were surprised to see that I was 11, as I had a pretty good vocabulary and great spelling, so I thinks that they were being rude, in a sort of racist way.
How did they know what your age was? How can you say you were ignored when you were banned from Websites and "people were surprised to see you were 11"? If I got banned once because of my age, then I would have made sure no one knew what my age was the second time round, so am curious to know how people got to know your age. Question Think
Crinoid
Raidation: I propose another social experiment. Try keep conversation limited to the topic, programming, without involving unrelated - as we all agreed - information, like age, relationships with parents or in school, how you spend your free time, and see what happens.

If you were not answered or ignored then, you are not alone, this happens for most of us, adults. For some reason people present at the moment at forum in question are not interested in pursuing this conversation, event it is vital for your interests. This is a common occurrence.

Another thing: don't take for granted that you will not be ignored when you are adult, say, after 30 yrs old. Nobody's fault, be in peace with own inner "I" and proud of it, without seeking acceptance and approval outside. (I'm not assuming that you are seeking them now).

Cheers!
ratanegra
It's hard to determine someone else's age, and if someone isn't so mature almost everyone will say that they are 12 years old. That's normal.

So I always let them choose what age am I going to be depending on the maturity they believe I have.

It's not so easy to be mature, or to hide that I am not, while speaking English, because I don't know a lot of ways to say things to feign being really mature.

But if you are 14- years old, I will give you an advice. Try to speak with a good vocabulary, with complete words (INCOMPLETE WORDS: hey dud how r u? r u tryin to go upstairs?), always with a technical way to say things, hard to me, but easy for you tho were born in an English-speaking country.

I learned it in Spanish, but you can use it too, our countries are not so different.

Greetings!
fantoos
I don't think so that younger programmer are ignored by the members it all depend on their shared information or any query.
Fatality
The internet was still the early stages when I was 13 and I didn't have much involvement with it. I do have to agree that the stereotype of younger people in technology are immature and are therefore ignored. I, for one, wish I had people to learn from at that age. The sooner you can get started in technology the better off you'll be in the future whether is be in college or later in your career.

I have no problem with helping younger people with IT related issues, but I don't want to be disrespected or feel like my help is falling on idle ears. If you are young and aspiring to learn more in the field of IT it helps to leave your age out of it as long as you act mature and respect people.
Crazy_Canuck
I think it depends on the tone of their posts. I tend to ignore anyone who posts in text-speak. Whoever gave the advice to post in complete sentences was right on. If you do that and never actually tell anyone your age or discuss your jr. high classes I wouldn't have a clue.
Bluedoll
Ignoring the little mistakes . . . by Bluedoll

I don’t ignore a young person anywhere in fact relish seeing them around. Sometimes the energy and keen enthusiasm is a real blessing to observe. As far as the young evolvement with programming, what really is amazing is how well the young vitality can manage to accomplish in this skilled area.

Lets face it, there should be a dislike and a motive not to use any slurred remarks regarding comments about a persons interests. The computer culture put down names in general, isn’t really appreciated very much, even a new person can receive a name handle which is very lame on the part of the person giving it.

What may be difficult at times with younger people is that the level of maturity will sometimes show through causing their posts to be disruptive for various reasons. For that reason only and not simply because of someone’s status which in this case is age, will might it get ignored but only because the posts are abusive or extremely negative and not for any other reason.
biljap
Why would young programmers be ignored if they show that they have knowledge and are willing to get more experience? Confused
carlospro7
When I was 14 years old and surfing the web, playing a game or posting in a forum. I never revealed my age because of that reason. I was afraid of being judged by my age.
deanhills
carlospro7 wrote:
When I was 14 years old and surfing the web, playing a game or posting in a forum. I never revealed my age because of that reason. I was afraid of being judged by my age.
Good instincts! How did people respond to you, did they know the difference?
Ghost900
I wouldn't ignore a young programmer but then again I started Frihost being kinda young, not thirteen but still under eighteen. I think that most people don't want to waste there time telling them how to fix something as its probably above there head, which it may be for some of them but not all of them. Same thing for older people, I think we generally think they won't pick stuff up quickly and are less likely to understand as well.
carlospro7
deanhills wrote:
Good instincts! How did people respond to you, did they know the difference?


I don't think people could tell, and usually I was treated well. Very Happy
[FuN]goku
Hm , this is the first I'm really hearing of something like this. When I was younger , I was fairly open about my age, I didn't really care what people thought of me, I wasn't afraid of being judged or anything.

While I haven't seen something like this in programming, I have seen similar events, like when I would be in hackthissite.org's IRC over the summer chatting with some of the members in there, alot of the time throughout the day, there would be some random person come in and say "Quick how do I hack somone's msn" or, "Where can I download a keylogger" or something of the sort.

They'd ask some sort of question like that, and pretty much anyone who was in the irc channel at the time, would just troll the living daylights out of the person until they left. But in that case, I would think they deserve that, since they were obviously looking to "hack" (really they're just script kiddies or noobs) for malicious intent, as opposed for security purposes. Though , in these cases, age wasn't really specified , but some of them talk like they are about 10-14
supernova1987a
Well, what if someone had ignored Bill gates? you know when he started programming? he was just a kid. Idea
rockacola
I don't think younger posters are often ignored because of their age... I believe it is to do with maturity shown in their post.

Spelling mistakes, Internet shorthands and incorrect cappings are big no-nos Very Happy

You don't have to pretend or act like a grown up, just talk/type with respect and others will respect you back in return.
Dean_The_Great
I think it is just generally wise to conceal your age on forums and other types of online situations, because really it isn't relevant (unless its about censoring content such as pornographic materials). Young people can be very intelligent and well spoken individuals, and they can also be complete idiots, just like the older people... I think having different people with different perceptions is a welcome experience, regardless of age.
snowboardalliance
When people do not tell their age (which is normal), you tend to read into what they say and make judgments about their level of knowledge and experience in the matter. If you feel they make a lot of misspellings and incorrect claims, you will probably ignore them regardless of age. If they come out and say their age, it will also make a slight impression on your judgment.

Personally I just look at how people present themselves and decide if the post is worth reading or if it sounds immature.

Also, most people think younger people are less mature, because the majority of immature people are young and you get more mature with age. It's definitely true and if you look back at yourself a few years or several years ago, you will probably realize you are more mature now. The only thing is, people reach an "adult" maturity at different rates so age isn't that meaningful, just a generalization people tend to make.

Finally, we all started doing this (web design, programming, whatever) at some point and we were once in the shoes of the young people so we need to remember that and remember what it is like to be young.
taytay
I hate it when adults do this Sad In high school, they have a program that lets teachers manage and control students desktops. Only recently have they activated a feature on the program that allows only white-listed web sites to be viewed from these computers. Being a kid, I knew it was only a matter of time until the others found a way to disable it. Trying to be helpful I showed my teacher how anyone could easily do this, and also told her how/what to do to fix it, as well as what the technology staff can do. The very next day kids figured out this very flaw I was telling the teacher about.

The school has had this security program for several years now, and never has had anyone able to get through it. Now suddenly people are turning it off, My teacher tried to get me suspended for hacking the schools computers and teaching kids how to do it as well. And all because she knew for fact that I could get around it.

I should have just kept my mouth shut and let the kids run rampant as they usually do Sad That or the school should hire me temporarily to fix some of their security and network issues. haha. Sadly I know I could help, and the technology staff who have been to college for this stuff are having a hard time keeping up.. makes me worry about if I'm going to learn anything from college myself.
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