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That Feeling...





ninjakannon
Okay, this is a really simple question so I don't want repeated answers or general spam, please. Smile


I went paintballing earlier and obviously had to wear a helmet. Now, after coming back, it still feels as though I'm wearing it. I can 'feel it' pressing onto my nose and head as I had it on for several hours.

My question is: is there a name for this feeling / phenomenon?

It's a slightly odd question, but I would really like to know. Please don't reply if you don't know, unless of course you can confirm that there is no name for this. Razz
Diablosblizz
I don't believe there is a technical term for it, but I get the same thing. I have to wear a ball cap at work, and on break I usually take it off and I still have the feeling of it being there. Google didn't really turn up anything but I did find this:

http://www.johnsadventures.com/archives/2008/02/still-wearing-a-hat-syndrome/

Of course it's not really called that, but it leads me to believe that there is no technical term for it.
ninjakannon
Oh well done for finding something on Google! I had no idea what to search for because I didn't have a name for it.

I feel that 'name' is as actually pretty good at describing it even though it doesn't only occur after wearing a hat. That said, I find it strange that there isn't a technical term for something we've all felt at some time or another.


What I'm finding more odd is that I seem to be having the 'still-wearing-a-hat syndrome' with my eyes. When my eyes steadily gaze at the computer screen I find that I can see the edges of the goggles! I can't remember having that before.

Ever had that?

If there really is no technical name for this, perhaps we should arbitrarily assign one. Very Happy
[FuN]goku
I've had the same experience, but for me, it's with headphones. Kinda trippy Smile
Diablosblizz
Nope, I can't say I've had either the goggles or headphones ordeal, but I have had one with skiing. When your on the lift you still feel like your zooming down the mountain, ahh so much fun! Smile
Vladalf
I have the same feeling after I lift alot of weights. I still feel like I have the weights in my hands and I move my hands in all directions to catch the feeling of easiness. Bizzare, isn't it?
Vlad
deanhills
Vladalf wrote:
I have the same feeling after I lift alot of weights. I still feel like I have the weights in my hands and I move my hands in all directions to catch the feeling of easiness. Bizzare, isn't it?
Vlad
I have that feeling after diving. The feeling of being under water and the sounds under water including of the bubbles. Sort of a weird feeling. Also after I have been on the boat for a while and stand on firm ground, I still have that "boat" feeling under my feet. Smile
Twotone
I think you could call this the after effect feeling Cool
Did you ever press really hard against a wall or something then turn round fast you feel like you are still pressing eh?
Sometimes you still do and fall flat ...ouch Laughing
missdixy
Haha, I've often wondered this myself. Like most people who replied, I also get that feeling sometimes and I have also wondered the name. I guess there are some things which may be hard to talk about or describe or something, and people just never bothered to name it.

I say you start your own name!
Jamatu
I know exactly what you mean, there must be a name for it, I've had a quick search of google as I assume everyone else who has replied here! I can't find anything though, maybe wiki will have the answers?
ninjakannon
As still no one seems to have found this, we could have a go at naming it ourselves (as suggested).

There's the phenomenon of ghost limbs [EDIT] I mean phantom limbs [/EDIT], where people feel sensations in limbs or body parts that they no longer have. So perhaps it would be apt to name this beginning 'ghost' [EDIT] 'phantom' [/EDIT].
However, we could also add the prefix 'pseudo' to another word (pseudo effectively meaning false).

Then I think we either have to say sensation or feeling. So something like:

Ghost Feeling [EDIT] Phantom Feeling [/EDIT]
Ghost Sensation [EDIT] Phantom Sensation [/EDIT]
Pseudo-feeling
Pseudo-sensation

I prefer the last one. Got any other suggestions? Razz
saratdear
If you've been walking through water for some time...or cycling, after stopping, wouldn't you still have that feeling? Does that count?
ninjakannon
Yes, saratdear!

It seems that you experience pseudo-sensation after wearing or doing something that has a noticeable (or perhaps large) impact on your senses for a significant length of time.


I wonder whether this happens with all out senses?

If you eat only one food-type for a week (or many foods with a similar taste, perhaps?), will you then taste different foods 'incorrectly' for a short time?
James007
It's a phantom sensation, not a ghost sensation. Very Happy

Haven't got any pain in your helmet, have you?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phantom_pain Laughing
ninjakannon
James007 wrote:
It's a phantom sensation, not a ghost sensation. Very Happy

Haven't got any pain in your helmet, have you?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phantom_pain Laughing

Yes, that's what I meant! Thanks for the correction there. I'll just edit my post slightly. Confused
andersonic
Haha at 'still-wearing-a-hat syndrome'

I just recently had 'still think I'm playing Resident Evil 5 syndrome', after playing it non-stop. I get it after wearing glasses for a while too.
ParsaAkbari
Yeah i experianced the same after paintballing.
I like it xD
Fatality
I have several different occurences of a feeling like this. I also wish I knew what it was called. I used to play paintball so I have had similar feels like those of the orginal poster. I have also had times after jetskiing where I feel like I'm still on the water jetskiing even though I was standing still. Very interesting feelings. Sort of cool.
coolclay
I think it is a side effect of our nerves blocking out a certain skin stimulant. For example when you wear a hat when you first put it on you can certainly feel it, but eventually you'll forget it's there. Then when you take it off it still feels like it's there. It only happens I think when you have it on for an extended period of time, I don't think it will happen if you just put it on and take it off. This is just my theory though I have not read anything about.
ninjakannon
coolclay, as far as I'm aware our nerves themselves do not (and can not) block any stimulant.

My 'theory' is that after the brain has had a given input for an extended period of time it will, if it 'considers' it 'unimportant', stop 'making' you conscious of it. However, when the input is removed, it now 'expects' an input that isn't there. Due to this irregularity your subconscious now 'makes' your conscious aware of this by 'sending' the 'signal' it has not been 'sending' previously. After a time of no input, your brain adapts and stops giving this signal.

I've stuck a load of apostrophes around words there because of the difficulty in describing concepts like this.
deanhills
ninjakannon wrote:
coolclay, as far as I'm aware our nerves themselves do not (and can not) block any stimulant.

My 'theory' is that after the brain has had a given input for an extended period of time it will, if it 'considers' it 'unimportant', stop 'making' you conscious of it. However, when the input is removed, it now 'expects' an input that isn't there. Due to this irregularity your subconscious now 'makes' your conscious aware of this by 'sending' the 'signal' it has not been 'sending' previously. After a time of no input, your brain adapts and stops giving this signal.

I've stuck a load of apostrophes around words there because of the difficulty in describing concepts like this.
Sounds like a good theory to me. Almost the equivalent of a phantom leg after it has been amputated but on a micro "lingering" scale?
ninjakannon
deanhills wrote:
Sounds like a good theory to me. Almost the equivalent of a phantom leg after it has been amputated but on a micro "lingering" scale?

I watched an interesting documentary not long ago in which V. S. Ramachandran discussed his work on phantom limbs.

Part of the brain, the Cortical homunculus, 'contains' a physical representation of the body in which the body parts are jumbled. If you lose a limb, it is possible for the part of the Cortical homunculus that dealt with the missing limb to begin to take inputs from a neighbouring (in relation to position on the Cortical homunculus) body part. This enables you to receive input in a body part that no longer exists by touching the neighbouring body part. See Phantom_limb.

Then there's phantom pain, which I don't fully understand - but this is also a 'fault' in the brain.


This seems different from my theory of pseudo-sensation. However, it may be that the part of the brain that 'makes' you conscious of sensation is the Cortical homunculus (or this 'passes' on information to another brain 'module' that does); if this is the case, the Cortical homunculus is the part of the brain my theory considers. So maybe they're not that different after all. It's really difficult to say.
deanhills
ninjakannon wrote:
I watched an interesting documentary not long ago in which V. S. Ramachandran discussed his work on phantom limbs.

Part of the brain, the Cortical homunculus, 'contains' a physical representation of the body in which the body parts are jumbled. If you lose a limb, it is possible for the part of the Cortical homunculus that dealt with the missing limb to begin to take inputs from a neighbouring (in relation to position on the Cortical homunculus) body part. This enables you to receive input in a body part that no longer exists by touching the neighbouring body part. See Phantom_limb.

Then there's phantom pain, which I don't fully understand - but this is also a 'fault' in the brain.


This seems different from my theory of pseudo-sensation. However, it may be that the part of the brain that 'makes' you conscious of sensation is the Cortical homunculus (or this 'passes' on information to another brain 'module' that does); if this is the case, the Cortical homunculus is the part of the brain my theory considers. So maybe they're not that different after all. It's really difficult to say.
Good explanation and interesting especially regarding "phantom pain". If they can channel into that area that controls pain, would be awesome if they can stop chronic pain. Smile
tony
I've had a similar feeling after wearing headphones for a while. It must be on for a long, long time though.
Denvis
I get the same feeling when ever i wear sun glasses or a hat for a long time and take it off.
ankitdatashn
arre there is an englist word for it: "habitual" or "used-to".

that the best I can say, you've got used to that feeling, even I too feel that way. It like that if we go to a dentist and get a tooth implanted first there is a feeling of "feeling" the new tooth but soon we get used to it. If you want to know more about this feeling then go out and ask a dentist...
ninjakannon
ankitdatashn wrote:
arre there is an englist word for it: "habitual" or "used-to".

that the best I can say, you've got used to that feeling, even I too feel that way. It like that if we go to a dentist and get a tooth implanted first there is a feeling of "feeling" the new tooth but soon we get used to it. If you want to know more about this feeling then go out and ask a dentist...

Being habituated to something - in terms of being used to it - is not what I am talking about. Although, I would say that getting used to an input is the first step of what I am talking about.

I am referring to the feeling you get after you have become used to an input for an extended period of time and then the input is removed abruptly. Often, you feel as if you are still receiving the input.

Interestingly, you have highlighted a case that doesn't follow this. If you get a tooth removed, say, then you won't (at least I don't, and I have got the impression others don't) feel as if the tooth is still there, but will be alerted and extra-aware of the fact that it is gone.

I will hazard a guess as to why this may be different. The mouth is more sensitive than your average body area, so perhaps the loss of the input is registered more quickly or maybe the entire area is dealt with differently.
Ghost900
I vote for the "Pseudo-feeling" Smile

I did a search on Live.com to see if something not on Google would come up but it seems there is no name for said feeling.

I have had a similar feeling a couple of times as well.
Greatking
i know the feeling. it settles on you like the sun and moves off you . i will try and get the name. i think there is. i will speak to some people and i know i can get it. its something that every human being has. there is an explanation to everything God created.
Triple_7
Hat and headphones is the usual culprit, I've lost my hat several times and didn't even realize it.

Biggest one I get is after a flight, get off the plane and still feel like I'm airborne. Depending on the length of the flight that feeling lasts either a couple minutes or a couple hours. It took nearly 2 days to get rid of that feeling after I spent about 30 hours getting home from Taiwan in 2006. 22 hours of that was spent in the air. Its a strange feeling really. Anyone who's walked about an aircraft while in flight knows that kind of floating feeling you get, side to side, up and down. Kind of a disorienting feeling to still have when your back on solid ground. Confused
Tuvitor
The brain is a tricky thing. I wonder if this is related to the phantom limb thing where someone will lose an arm but they will still feel pain as if it was still there and damaged...
ninjakannon
Tuvitor, please read the previous posts as this has already been suggested and discussed. If you can further the discussion after this reading, I would be delighted!

EDIT: Oh, and Greatking, if you get any more information from those people you know that would also be brilliant!
Arnie
[FuN]goku wrote:
I've had the same experience, but for me, it's with headphones. Kinda trippy Smile
Been listening to music too long again? Or was it that FPS Twisted Evil
carlospro7
I get this feeling after wearing sun glasses sometimes. I kind of like the name pseudo-sensation

This may be another type of phenomenon, but when I'm too aware that I'm wearing sun glasses, I can't wear them because I tend to get a tingly feeling on the part of my nose where the sun glasses rest. Of course, this happens almost every time I wear sun glasses, so I always try really hard not to think about them, but eventually I do. While I'm not thinking about them it's fine. The thing is, I feel like I can't tell if the tingling is real or if my brain is just making it up. I don't know. Laughing
ninjakannon
Ha! That's an interesting one carlospro7!

I wear glasses practically all the time, but when I was reading your post I decided to focus on the feeling of the nose pads touching me. I could make this feeling become a tingle very easily, but also make it feel like a great pressure. It's all in the mind!

Darn, now I can't make it go away; it's like a pressing and tingling feeling!

What you've described is a different phenomenon. The brain is receiving a constant input that it isn't used to and you're concentrating on it. For some reason the act of thinking about it can have an effect on the experience you have of that input. That's the tingling sensation. I can't really explain it more than that, though!
carlospro7
ninjakannon wrote:
Ha! That's an interesting one carlospro7!

I wear glasses practically all the time, but when I was reading your post I decided to focus on the feeling of the nose pads touching me. I could make this feeling become a tingle very easily, but also make it feel like a great pressure. It's all in the mind!

Darn, now I can't make it go away; it's like a pressing and tingling feeling!

What you've described is a different phenomenon. The brain is receiving a constant input that it isn't used to and you're concentrating on it. For some reason the act of thinking about it can have an effect on the experience you have of that input. That's the tingling sensation. I can't really explain it more than that, though!


I know! it's crazy Surprised I get that pressure feeling too. See, I guess after the first time I noticed the tingling, I became too conscious of it, and now every time I wear sun glasses it's like I'm afraid it's going to happen, so it's even worse. Oh well, what can you do? As you may have already guessed, I don't wear any kind of glasses that often. I hope anyone reading this doesn't become conscious of it too.
toasterintheoven
end of story, I'm dreaming about it all the time now, it's great
jabce85
sort of related...... stand with your weight leaning against a wall and your arm touching the wall pointed toward the ground.. try to press your arm that is touching the wall into the wall..... do this for about 20 seconds.... now step away from the wall and watch what your arm does...... as i said.... kind of related, but not really.
menino
yes, its better to be called "after effect feeling".
I've had it couple of times. I think it even occurs for people who wear watches for long time?
After removing the watch, sometimes I feel as if I'm still wearing it, and look for the time. Smile

I think its the way the nerves that are attached to the skin attached to the object interact with the brain. Shocked
ninjakannon
menino wrote:
yes, its better to be called "after effect feeling".

Why is this "better"? I much prefer my the terms I used containing the word 'phantom' as they link with some actually scientific definitions of similar conditions.

Yeah, it also happens with watches...

menino wrote:
I think its the way the nerves that are attached to the skin attached to the object interact with the brain. Shocked

I don't completely understand what you said (it doesn't make sense); however, the gist of it sounds incorrect. If you could explain that would be great, but I'd be surprised if it were nerve related as I'm sure nerves don't retain their signals post-event.
ankitdatashn
ninjakannon wrote:
....
I will hazard a guess as to why this may be different. The mouth is more sensitive than your average body area, so perhaps the loss of the input is registered more quickly or maybe the entire area is dealt with differently.....


I will do a research and get back to you on this, Mann how do people think so much, but anyways nice topic and I too think pseudo-feeling is a nice option.
BigGeek
Proprioception

i found this on Wikipedia but it applies to phantom limbs, and not to phantom touch.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proprioception

Not really the same thing but the previous post about phantom limbs has an explanation that might suffice to explain what you are feeling.

There are all sorts of things, like feeling like you are still in the water after a long swim, feeling like you are still surfing or water skiing after a long time doing so. feeling like you are still wearing a cast on your arm after it has been removed, and on and on.

My personal theory is that everything is electric, right? One can claim not, but everything has some sort of inherent electrical field be it almost unmeasurable that is associated with the vibration of frequency of that object. that frequency gets imbued into your own energy field and you continue to feel it even after it is removed. There is a similar thing in the Proprioception discussion about the mind map, but that just takes us back to the old western notion that the only generator of phenomenon is the brain, and western beliefs cannot bridge the gap to having an energy field that actually extends away from the body, but is part of the body. Chinese meridian charts have mapped this energy field but western medicine refuses to acknowledge it presence. My feeling is that things can imprint on this field and give you a sensation of it still being there!
ninjakannon
BigGeek wrote:
My personal theory is that everything is electric, right? One can claim not, but everything has some sort of inherent electrical field be it almost unmeasurable that is associated with the vibration of frequency of that object. that frequency gets imbued into your own energy field and you continue to feel it even after it is removed. There is a similar thing in the Proprioception discussion about the mind map, but that just takes us back to the old western notion that the only generator of phenomenon is the brain, and western beliefs cannot bridge the gap to having an energy field that actually extends away from the body, but is part of the body. Chinese meridian charts have mapped this energy field but western medicine refuses to acknowledge it presence. My feeling is that things can imprint on this field and give you a sensation of it still being there!

That makes literally no sense, I'm not even going to start refuting it.
iman
Maybe it's the same feeling you get after losing a limb or arm. Ghost limbs?
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