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Canada





imera
I live in Europe, and the only things about North America I know is what I read. I have never lived in a big city and I'm not even sure I'll like it.

Well, my boyfriend thinks about going to study in Calgary or Edmonton, and I would like to live in Canada (preferred a smaller place than those two cities) but I'll join him first until he is done with college.

So does anyone have any experience with those cities? Or how it is like to live in Canada? I would like to hear about the bad as well as the good, so I'll know what I need to expect.
deanhills
You will find that Calgary and Edmonton are not as big as it sounds. It gets even smaller when yhou get there as if it is Calgary, you will be living either in Calgary North, West, East or South, and live in one of those two, and find yourself mostly located in those much smaller places. Edmonton gets a lot of snow and has a longer winter than Calgary as Calgary has the warm Chinook winds coming from the mountains, so it will snow one day and start melting the next. Snow only stays put in Calgary for a number of very cold days. Temperatures do go down though and sometimes as low as 30 degrees Celsius below freezing. Alberta is a beautiful Province of Canada, with fantastic lanscapes, mountains and lakes and make for readily accessible weekend outings all times of the year. It is very beautiful during the winter and also enjoyable during the summer. Edmonton is smaller than Calgary, but has more cultural events, and a more homogeneous population. If you are more of a small town person, perhaps you would be more suited to Edmonton. My choice would be Calgary as it is very international, has international flight connections to international capitals of the world, the people are great.
imera
Thanks a lot Very Happy both sounds great now, now I have to see what he'll chose and then I'll check out both when we move
Dean_The_Great
Wow, I was going to give a bunch of information on the subject, but deanhills was very very throughout, so there's not much for me to add. I think I just want to mention that Edmonton has the largest shopping mall in the world (if you are interested in such things) and Calgary has the Calgary Stampede, which is an amazing rodeo festival. That being said, if you live in either city you will most certainly have to make an excursion to the other. Travel and see the rest of Alberta, or Canada if you get the chance! It's a wonderful country!
mrcool
my family will be moving to Canada 5 years from now, we still have to prepare things before moving there...
deanhills
mrcool wrote:
my family will be moving to Canada 5 years from now, we still have to prepare things before moving there...
Five years are a long time. Why so long and where in Canada are you thinking of moving to?
imera
Dean_The_Great wrote:
Travel and see the rest of Alberta, or Canada if you get the chance! It's a wonderful country!


My boyfriend told me that after he finish college, and get a job and a little money we'll buy one of those big buses that you can live in and we'll drive around in Canada, I kind of look forward to that because Canada is one country that I would like to see a lot of. Canada, Ireland and Italy are the places I wish to visit often, haven't been to either of those, sad
mrcool
deanhills wrote:
mrcool wrote:
my family will be moving to Canada 5 years from now, we still have to prepare things before moving there...
Five years are a long time. Why so long and where in Canada are you thinking of moving to?



yes, 5 years..it is a long time...but it is still fine.....it isn't easy to process all those papers for us to migate in canada...it takes 5 years approx... we are planning to move in toronto...
deanhills
mrcool wrote:
deanhills wrote:
mrcool wrote:
my family will be moving to Canada 5 years from now, we still have to prepare things before moving there...
Five years are a long time. Why so long and where in Canada are you thinking of moving to?



yes, 5 years..it is a long time...but it is still fine.....it isn't easy to process all those papers for us to migate in canada...it takes 5 years approx... we are planning to move in toronto...
It's supposed to take two years or a little more than that at most. Possibly the timings will have to coincide with your papers when you have been approved for landed immigration, as you may have one year to take up residence. That is of course easily obtained, as you could go ahead of your own immigration date, but may complicate things as it could be expensive for the whole family to travel twice? In my experience of people emigrating to Canada from the Middle East, they usually firm up the landed immigration by travelling to Canada once a year. He would then leave his family with friends in Canada for a prolonged stay of a few months. They have been doing this for a number of years as he still seems to be in a better situation job-wise here in the Middle East than what he has been able to find in Canada, which has not been that much so far.
Bluedoll
home . . . by Bluedoll

Canada is diverse. The east coastal regions are all about fishing and very friendly folk people. The west coast is busy and beautiful, lower canada has a lot variety to it, the flatlands or prairies (listen to prairie oyster a musical group if you like) have very large farms and the native north, you might say, a lot of empty space. Of course it depends on what we like and don’t like but you just might be able to find a region, you do like.

Personally I lived in Edmonton for a while and yes it is a city but once you get outside the busy, everything changes of course dramatically. The ‘west’, Edmonton and Calgary is all about oil and cowboy hat heritage so you might want to put one on gal and go out dancin’. Let your man take you around in a circle on the dance floor but make sure you go the right way around or you may just get bumped!

Edmonton in the oil boom times, was busy in my mind, a little wild (guys that would drive fast and beep their horns and smile) but funny sometimes. Once a year they had Klondike days to celebrate the wild western days of riding a raft up the river in search of gold. Not sure what it is like now but one guy got in trouble when I was there for putting this eastern dude in a mock jail fur not wearing a cowboy hat. Just a joke really but I guess the guy didn’t like it and complained.(civil rights - you know) It was a case of a bad sense of humour.

The winters have very cold periods where you don’t want to expose your skin or chance freezing it but it does warm up and the summers are better after that! Calgary is a closer drive to the rocky mountains, a place to run off to, to get away from it all.

The news says Alberta is in a slump after years and years of prosperity. Does this have something to do with the stock market or oil prices? Not sure, maybe something to do with a global thing? I don't know. The government has closed some programs like one for gays and lesbians. Other provinces like Ontario have kept the programs though. At least that is what it said on the cbc.

You will meet all kinds of people from all over world, and some of the locals that still say eh (pronounced a). Say it now and then at the end of a sentence. You will fit right in, eh. Oh, one other thing, you did said include the bad too, so always complain about the weather and about your favorite hockey team not winning this year, don’t get upset about politics just say, “that’s the government for yaw!” and if you think you are going to jump in the lake without testing the waters first, find out what a ‘loonie’ really is.

Hope this helps, I know it is kind of long but I had fun writing it.
deanhills
Bluedoll wrote:
The ‘west’, Edmonton and Calgary is all about oil and cowboy hat heritage so you might want to put one on gal and go out dancin’. Let your man take you around in a circle on the dance floor but make sure you go the right way around or you may just get bumped!
I thought it was gas, more than oil? And that the gas is an enormous source of fuel not only for Canada but also selling it to the United States. And both Edmonton and Calgary are much much more than just oil and cowboys. There are some areas in the smaller towns that can be classified as "red neck" zones, but Calgary has quite a large percentage of people from all places in the world.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calgary
Quote:
Calgary was ranked the world's cleanest city by Mercer Quality of Living in a survey published in 2007 by Forbes magazine. The city has ranked highly[21] in quality of life surveys: 25th in the 2006, 24th in 2007 and 25th again in the 2008 Mercer Quality of Living Survey,[22] and 10th best city to live in according to the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU).[23] Despite the oil industry's dominance in Alberta's economy, Calgary ranked as the world's cleanest city by Forbes Magazine in 2007.[6]


Edmonton is famous for a number of cultural events and is dubbed "Festival City" as a result. It also has the largest shopping mall in North America, a weekend getaway for people in other parts of Canada and the United States, including a Bourbon Street after hour entertainment as part of the Mall. It is a cultural city with many cultural pursuits:

Quote:
Many events are anchored in the downtown Arts District, centred around the recently renovated Churchill Square (named in honour of Sir Winston Churchill). On the south side of the river, the University district and Whyte Avenue contain theatres, concert halls, and various live music venues.

The Francis Winspear Centre for Music[71] was opened in 1997 after years of planning and fundraising.[72] Described as one of the most acoustically perfect concert halls in Canada, it is home to the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra and hosts a wide variety of shows every year. It seats 1,932 patrons and houses the $3-million Davis Concert Organ, the largest concert organ in Canada.[73] An interesting aspect of the hall's design is its separation into acoustically separate areas that are insulated from each other through acoustical barriers built into the structure. Patrons and artists can see these in the form of double-door "sound locks."

Across 102nd Avenue is the Citadel Theatre, named after The Salvation Army Citadel in which Joe Shoctor first started the Citadel Theatre Company in 1965. It is now one of the largest theatre complexes in Canada, with five halls each, specializing in different kinds of productions.[74] For instance, the Maclab Theatre features a thrust stage surrounded by a U-shaped seating arrangement, while the Shoctor Theatre is a traditional stage setup.

On the University of Alberta grounds is the 2,534-seat Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, which recently went through a year of heavy renovations carried out as part of the province's centennial celebrations. Both it and its southern twin in Calgary were constructed in 1955 for the province's silver jubilee and have hosted many concerts, musicals, and ballets. The Edmonton Opera uses the Jubilee as its base of operations. On the front of the building is a quote from Suetonius' Life of Augustus: "He found a city built of brick—left it built of marble."

Old Strathcona is home to the Theatre District, which holds the Transalta Arts Barns (headquarters of the Edmonton International Fringe Festival), The Walterdale Playhouse, Catalyst Theatre, and the Varscona Theatre (base of operations for several theatre companies, including Teatro la Quindicina, Shadow Theatre, Rapid Fire Theatre, Die-Nasty, and Oh Susanna!). Edmonton was named cultural capital of Canada in 2007.[75]

Ukrainian Dnipro Ensemble of Edmonton, organized in 1953, preserves the Ukrainian musical culture within the parameters of the Canadian multicultural identity.[76]

[edit] Nightlife
There are several key concentrations of nightlife in the city of Edmonton. The most popular is the Whyte Avenue (82nd Avenue) strip, concentrated between 109 Street and 99 Street; it has the highest concentration of heritage buildings in Edmonton.[77] Once the heart of the town of Strathcona (annexed by Edmonton on February 1, 1912), it fell into disrepair during the middle of the 20th century.[78] Beginning in the 1970s, a concentrated effort to revive the area through the establishment of a Business Revitalization Zone has produced an area rich with restored historical buildings and pleasant streetscapes.[79] Its proximity to the University of Alberta has led to a high concentration of establishments ranging from restaurants and pubs (such as Murietta's and the Black Dog Freehouse) to trendy clubs (Wooly Bully's and Lucky 13) while hosting a wide variety of shops during the day (Plush, Foosh Apparel and Bamboo Ballroom). This area also contains two independent movie theatres: the Garneau and Princess theatres, as well as several live theatre, music, and comedy venues.[80]

Downtown Edmonton has undergone a continual process of renewal and unprecedented growth since the mid-1990s. Many buildings were demolished during the oil boom, starting in the 1960s and continuing into the 1980s, to make way for office towers. As such, there have always been numerous pub-type establishments such as The Rose and Crown, Sherlock Holmes', and Elephant & Castle, as well as many hotel lounges and restaurants. The past decade has seen a strong resurgence in more mainstream venues. Edmonton also has a high demand for pub crawl tours in the city. Various clubs such as the New City Suburbs, Oil City Roadhouse, The Bank, and Halo are also to be found along Edmonton's main street, Jasper Avenue. The Edmonton City Centre mall also houses an Empire Theatres movie theatre, featuring ten screens. The nonprofit Metro Cinema[81] shows a variety of alternative or otherwise unreleased films every week.

West Edmonton Mall holds several after-hour establishments in addition to its many stores and attractions. Bourbon Street has numerous eating establishments; clubs and casinos can also be found within the complex. Scotiabank Theatre (formerly known as Silver City), at the west end of the mall, is a theater that features twelve screens and an IMAX.[82]




Wikipedia has much more information on Edmonton and Calgary, worth looking at. They are definitely more than just about oil and gas and cowboys:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmonton
bsbteng
I live in China, and I am going to immiganr to Canada and I would like to live in Canada (preferred a smaller place than those two cities) .

I also want to know your experience about Canada?

So does anyone have any experience with those cities? Or how it is like to live in Canada? I would like to hear about the bad as well as the good, so I'll know what I need to expect.
deanhills
bsbteng wrote:
I live in China, and I am going to immiganr to Canada and I would like to live in Canada (preferred a smaller place than those two cities) .

I also want to know your experience about Canada?

So does anyone have any experience with those cities? Or how it is like to live in Canada? I would like to hear about the bad as well as the good, so I'll know what I need to expect.
The bad part is taxes. The anxiety associated with paying taxes is quite high, to the extent that people who are in the lowest tax brackets, also use accountants and bookkeepers to do their taxes for them. Also depending on what you can offer Canada in terms of your skills, it will most likely have to compete with others. It is not very easy to find a job, and when you finally get it, just as difficult to keep it. You may easily find that your qualifications from China will be considered on a lower level than North American qualifications, and that you will have to start at a lower salary than Canadians have to start for having Canadian experience. Credit is initially also difficult to find as all your banking relationships in China will be discounted in Canada. Preferably you will need a good banking balance in order to get a banking account. You will also need to have credit accounts with Department stores, in order to get more credit. These are of course all the negatives. Positives are that it is a free country, discrimination is not allowed, it stands for very good values, very little snobbery, social services are excellent, but of course you pay for those through taxes and special fees. Canada also has a very strong environmental movement which means in comparison with some of the big cities in China, its air polution is much less.
Crazy_Canuck
Excellent information on Canada!

I would also add that we have a very low crime rate, even in the biggest cities (I live in Toronto). While it varies across the country, "the right to bear arms" is not held as a core moral value as it is in the U.S., and therefore gun ownership is less prevalent. It's a chicken-egg thing: because crime is lower people don't generally feel the need to protect themselves by owning firearms. And because fewer people own firearms, there is less violence all around.

While there is poverty and homelessness, especially in the larger cities, there is also a very long tradition of social service and universal health care which tends to reduce the effects of poverty. Canada is also among one of the most diverse countries in terms of ethnicity, language, culture and races, and while it would be foolish to think that racism doesn't exist, there has never been a tradition of race riots as there has been in the U.S.
deanhills
Crazy_Canuck wrote:
Excellent information on Canada!

I would also add that we have a very low crime rate, even in the biggest cities (I live in Toronto). While it varies across the country, "the right to bear arms" is not held as a core moral value as it is in the U.S., and therefore gun ownership is less prevalent. It's a chicken-egg thing: because crime is lower people don't generally feel the need to protect themselves by owning firearms. And because fewer people own firearms, there is less violence all around.

While there is poverty and homelessness, especially in the larger cities, there is also a very long tradition of social service and universal health care which tends to reduce the effects of poverty. Canada is also among one of the most diverse countries in terms of ethnicity, language, culture and races, and while it would be foolish to think that racism doesn't exist, there has never been a tradition of race riots as there has been in the U.S.
Well said for me too! Smile The part about racism is the closest to my heart. It does exist, but it is never in your face and people get genuinely shocked when any of its ugly faces shows itself in rare moments.
nigam
deanhills wrote:
mrcool wrote:
deanhills wrote:
mrcool wrote:
my family will be moving to Canada 5 years from now, we still have to prepare things before moving there...
Five years are a long time. Why so long and where in Canada are you thinking of moving to?



yes, 5 years..it is a long time...but it is still fine.....it isn't easy to process all those papers for us to migate in canada...it takes 5 years approx... we are planning to move in toronto...
It's supposed to take two years or a little more than that at most. Possibly the timings will have to coincide with your papers when you have been approved for landed immigration, as you may have one year to take up residence. That is of course easily obtained, as you could go ahead of your own immigration date, but may complicate things as it could be expensive for the whole family to travel twice? In my experience of people emigrating to Canada from the Middle East, they usually firm up the landed immigration by travelling to Canada once a year. He would then leave his family with friends in Canada for a prolonged stay of a few months. They have been doing this for a number of years as he still seems to be in a better situation job-wise here in the Middle East than what he has been able to find in Canada, which has not been that much so far.


my aunt and her family will be migrating this august....they applied 5 years ago...usually, it takes 5 years as what i have observed...once they landed there, it will be easier for them as they already have jobs waiting for them...

with regards to leaving his family with friends for them to have a better situation, i don't think that asians would prefer to do like that as we will do our best to live a pleasant life. here in our country, we even worked more than 10 hrs. a day to get a high pay for a week, how much more if we will worked in canada...
deanhills
nigam wrote:
with regards to leaving his family with friends for them to have a better situation, i don't think that asians would prefer to do like that as we will do our best to live a pleasant life. here in our country, we even worked more than 10 hrs. a day to get a high pay for a week, how much more if we will worked in canada...
So if life is pleasant in your country, why would you want to emigrate to Canada?
nigam
deanhills wrote:
nigam wrote:
with regards to leaving his family with friends for them to have a better situation, i don't think that asians would prefer to do like that as we will do our best to live a pleasant life. here in our country, we even worked more than 10 hrs. a day to get a high pay for a week, how much more if we will worked in canada...
So if life is pleasant in your country, why would you want to emigrate to Canada?



i mean...we have to worked hard for our family to live pleasantly....i can't say we have a pleasant life, though we have a business but the reason why we want to migrate is for the future of our child or maybe my children soon...also, even if you worked hard, your earnings are still not enough because the salary is very very low...thats why if we will live and work in another country...our hardwork is worth for as what i have heard from others and based on my relatives settle in canada already....here in our country...if you're born poor, you will die poor....
deanhills
nigam wrote:
deanhills wrote:
nigam wrote:
with regards to leaving his family with friends for them to have a better situation, i don't think that asians would prefer to do like that as we will do our best to live a pleasant life. here in our country, we even worked more than 10 hrs. a day to get a high pay for a week, how much more if we will worked in canada...
So if life is pleasant in your country, why would you want to emigrate to Canada?



i mean...we have to worked hard for our family to live pleasantly....i can't say we have a pleasant life, though we have a business but the reason why we want to migrate is for the future of our child or maybe my children soon...also, even if you worked hard, your earnings are still not enough because the salary is very very low...thats why if we will live and work in another country...our hardwork is worth for as what i have heard from others and based on my relatives settle in canada already....here in our country...if you're born poor, you will die poor....
Same in Canada except in reverse. The salary may look bigger when you convert it ino your currency, but cost of living and taxes are much higher. For me the only good part would be the opportunity for the children to become international, learn a new language, see a different country, broaden their outlook. Whether they would find it better would be symbolically the same in China. If they do poorly in China, they will also do poorly in Canada. If they do well in China, they would have a better chance to do well in Canada, but may be less wealthy than they could have been in China. The international part is however good, as if they are good in what they are doing in China, they can work on opportunities where they can import and export their newly acquired skills in Canada.
nigam
deanhills wrote:
nigam wrote:
deanhills wrote:
nigam wrote:
with regards to leaving his family with friends for them to have a better situation, i don't think that asians would prefer to do like that as we will do our best to live a pleasant life. here in our country, we even worked more than 10 hrs. a day to get a high pay for a week, how much more if we will worked in canada...
So if life is pleasant in your country, why would you want to emigrate to Canada?



i mean...we have to worked hard for our family to live pleasantly....i can't say we have a pleasant life, though we have a business but the reason why we want to migrate is for the future of our child or maybe my children soon...also, even if you worked hard, your earnings are still not enough because the salary is very very low...thats why if we will live and work in another country...our hardwork is worth for as what i have heard from others and based on my relatives settle in canada already....here in our country...if you're born poor, you will die poor....
Same in Canada except in reverse. The salary may look bigger when you convert it ino your currency, but cost of living and taxes are much higher. For me the only good part would be the opportunity for the children to become international, learn a new language, see a different country, broaden their outlook. Whether they would find it better would be symbolically the same in China. If they do poorly in China, they will also do poorly in Canada. If they do well in China, they would have a better chance to do well in Canada, but may be less wealthy than they could have been in China. The international part is however good, as if they are good in what they are doing in China, they can work on opportunities where they can import and export their newly acquired skills in Canada.


exactly, thats the good part for the children...to live above from the others who stayed in our country..to widen their knowledge as well..
yes, taxes are very high but it is worth of what they paid for...Canada offered free schools, free hospitalizations and etc. unlike here in our country, some of our taxes will go for the benefit of the people but most of our taxes will go to their pocket. i am not talking thousands only but millions of dollars the most..
what i see in China, is a fast growing country....but it takes years and years in order for them to tie up with the big countries like japan, uk and usa...
deanhills
nigam wrote:
Canada offered free schools, free hospitalizations and .
Not everything is free these days. Especially with medical care there are basic service fees applicable. You also have to contribute to Medical Insurance. There are also some fees applicable to schools. Quite an enormous portion of taxes also go into the Government pockets and in bureacracy of managing special programmes including schools.
nigam
deanhills wrote:
nigam wrote:
Canada offered free schools, free hospitalizations and .
Not everything is free these days. Especially with medical care there are basic service fees applicable. You also have to contribute to Medical Insurance. There are also some fees applicable to schools. Quite an enormous portion of taxes also go into the Government pockets and in bureacracy of managing special programmes including schools.



yes....not everything is free now a days but still canada offers some to it...ohhh...i never heard that some government officials there were corrupt...
deanhills
nigam wrote:
deanhills wrote:
nigam wrote:
Canada offered free schools, free hospitalizations and .
Not everything is free these days. Especially with medical care there are basic service fees applicable. You also have to contribute to Medical Insurance. There are also some fees applicable to schools. Quite an enormous portion of taxes also go into the Government pockets and in bureacracy of managing special programmes including schools.



yes....not everything is free now a days but still canada offers some to it...ohhh...i never heard that some government officials there were corrupt...
Maybe you need to read up on the history of some of the politicians. But at least there is a clear understanding that corruption is wrong and when they are found out, they are usually prosecuted. I understand that in certain of the especially less developed countries there is a general understanding that there are differently rules regarding corruption for those who are in Government.
malcolmpreen
and best of all Canada has Hockey Night in Canada.... (and TSN and Rogers Sportsnet)

Malcolm
deanhills
malcolmpreen wrote:
and best of all Canada has Hockey Night in Canada.... (and TSN and Rogers Sportsnet)

Malcolm
Good point! And these can be viewed in some nice spots, pubs etc with buddies. Great fun!
supernova1987a
canada is in north so must be cold out there, but good as well. since i have never been there i do not know how it is. but i have always wanted to go there.
goutha
The weather in Canada will be different if you are in the West coast or East coast.

The East coast is much more colder with huge snow storms.

However, Canada is a very interesting country to visit (by winter or summer). Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal are a must. Vancouver will remind you Asia, Toronto is North American, and Montreal has a fragrance of Europe.
mikeperhem1
Canada is very beautiful city to visit. The weather in Canada will be different if you are moving from one place to another. Really, it is an awesome place to visit and have lots of fun over there.
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