FRIHOST • FORUMS • SEARCH • FAQ • TOS • BLOGS • COMPETITIONS
You are invited to Log in or Register a free Frihost Account!


Raising a puppy





Idoru
The smallest playful, adoreble little creature, a puppy. We just became the owners of a little one, nine weeks old.
She is just wonderful, a mixed breed, mainly Bichon Fraise and Lhasa Apso. There will be pictures of her later. Smile
Anyhow, besides from beeing cute, they take some work, the dogs-to-be. I have some experience of dogs and
training them since before, and some of you migth recognize me from earlier discussions here. Anyhow,
This post I started since there never can be to much advise on how to raise the little ones. What's the best
way of housebreaking? How to train away the constante biting? At what age should one stop just bounding,
and bring more rules in to the puppys life? etc, etc.

I haven't brought up a puppy in a long time, and theorys change about what's the best, so I want to hear all
your opinions! General as specific.
jwellsy
I am a firm believer in crate training. Every night the dog has to sleep in the crate.

Use simple consistant verbal and hand commands. Don't talk to them in sentences.

Even as a pup don't let them fool you with avoidance behaiviors.

Get her spayed as soon as possible.
bigt
jwellsy wrote:
I am a firm believer in crate training. Every night the dog has to sleep in the crate.

Use simple consistant verbal and hand commands. Don't talk to them in sentences.

Even as a pup don't let them fool you with avoidance behaiviors.

Get her spayed as soon as possible.


We weren't strict on the crate training. The crate was probably a little large for our miniature schnauzer, but she got the idea. The crate was put in the kitchen or bathroom b/c those areas were big enough for the crate, bowls, pee pads and they were not carpeted Smile Pee pads and no carpet are great when house training.

I'd recommend getting the pup on a schedule quick. I think we took our dog out about every 2 hours when we were there. The dog is probably house trained when you get home and the pee pad doesn't have anything on it and it's ripped up, heh. Also, give the pup a few weeks to get used to you before getting into command training. Don't let it play with the retractable leash (yes, that's from experience) and watch out for biting or the hand play that leads to biting.

Best wishes with the new pup. Dogs really are man's best friend.
ocalhoun
^Crate training is a great thing. Dogs need to feel that they have their own personal 'den' to sleep in.
It'll also help with housebreaking, because they won't relive themselves in their den if it is small enough.
Crazy_Canuck
I agree that crate training is a good thing. Just make sure that the crate is not too big for the puppy.
fx-trading-education
I also think that dogs need to have their own place top sstay but also their own place to play, bite and play. Then I would say that it is better that a dog lives in a place that looks like a normal place to live for a dog and that if of course not inside a house.
I understand that for small dogs it is not always possible depending on the climate of the place were you live, but again I think that people should choose local breeds or at least breeds compatible with their environment. In my opinion dogs are happier that way.
It is also extremly important for the dog to have been taught that he is a dog and not a human. Dogs that are living like humans (sleeping in bed, sitting on sofa...) may become aggressive or even dangerous in few cases.
ese87
crates are good for puppies as already said.

As for rules, introduce rules from into the house from DAY 1 so to speak, never allow for the dog to show bad behaviour at any time... I know someone who has a lab puppy, and she is real nice, what you would expect from a puppy, but bites constantly... you cannot simply laugh at this behaviour, rules are needed to be introduced to ensure she grows up as a nice and happy dog
Wolf1918
I don't have any experience with crate training a puppy. The concept came into popularity after my last dog had already died. He never had a crate and never was put into a carrier. He was too big for a carrier anyway. I've read that crate training is good for helping to house train since dogs don't like to mess where they sleep.

The books I used way back then were written by the Monks of New Skete. "The Art of Raising a Puppy" and (I think) "Being Your Dog's Best Friend"

I've looked at other books recently since I am considering getting a puppy in the next year or two. You might want to look at books is by Cesar Milan, "Cesar's Way" and "Being The Pack Leader". A lot of his information is about correcting problems once they get started and not so much about training from the beginning.

There are a LOT of books on dog training and it's hard to decide which ones are good, which aren't and which ones are total bulls***. But I put a lot of faith and trust in the Monks of New Skete (my German Shepherd turned out to be the best dog I've ever had, and I did not get him from the Monks' breeding program, he came from a private breeder) and Cesar. All of these books should be available in your local library so you can read through them before you put down your hard earned money. If you go with the New Skete books, try to get the newer revised editions.

Good luck with your new family member,
Chad
Idoru
Nice to see so many replies Smile

This with crate-training is a new concept for me, and I have been doing some reading up. I must say, that I
can see some of the benefits, but that I don't agree with that harsh view on the dog. I think the same can
be accomplished, perhaps with more work and attention, the 'good old fashion way'. I'm am not a supporter
of the old methods of raising the puppy with yells and sticks, but neither of bringing treats and diversions
in to every encounter.

As for crate-training, I don't even think it's allowed here in Sweden, where I live. A new set of animal-right
laws where recentlly passed, focusing on dogs and cats situations. They regulate that you can't leave a dog alone for
longer periods of time, that they can't be confined for longer periods of time etc.

As for the keeping of a dog in his/hers own place, as <i>fx-trading-education</i> brought up, it's not an option.
The little pup who moved in with us is for the share joy of it. Wink Life is a good thing, better shared, and
shared with a dog is something special. Perhaps your philosophy is more for working dogs?

And <i>ese87</i>, I sure can grasp that. Very Happy Our little girl is almost to cute, but when it comes to biting (and some
other stuff), we are as firm as we would have been with a Rottweiler. It's just not ok.

Finally, Chad (<i>Wolf1918</i>), thx! Smile
She is becomming more and more certain of her place in the family. We go by some of the spirit Cesar spread,
and use his knowledge as inspiration. Cool
the Monks of New Skete I'll check up.
ocalhoun
Idoru wrote:

As for crate-training, I don't even think it's allowed here in Sweden, where I live. A new set of animal-right
laws where recentlly passed, focusing on dogs and cats situations. They regulate that you can't leave a dog alone for
longer periods of time, that they can't be confined for longer periods of time etc.

Thats messed up... Really, it is better for the dog. Done properly, the dog will see it as a safe place, and a place that is its own, and like being in it. (You should never put the dog in there as punishment.) An old lab I once had liked his so much that when we cleaned his cage and put it out in the yard with him to dry, he went inside it rather than play outside. My parents' new dog is very possessive of her cage: she'll always be paying very close attention any time you do anything with it, and whenever you're done messing with it, she'll always go inside to make sure its the same as it was.
jwellsy
Ocalhoun is absolutley right. Crate training is not the same thing as raising the dog in a kennel. I agree that keeping a dog locked up in a cage like a puppy mill would be cruel. But, thats not what crate training is about.

If you don't use a crate what do you do when company comes over that is all dressed up and doesn't want/need dog hair all over their fine clothes, or they are alergic to dogs or even afraid of dogs? With a crate you just tell them to go kennel (or whatever command you consistantly use).

Very few dogs would stay in an open bed for more than 20-30minutes. The temptation to come come out and join in uninvited is too much for most dogs to resist for very long. Why set them up for failure and probably getting yelled at.

Most destructive behaviors by puppies is done while unattended/unsupervised. A crate can prevent pillows, coffee tables, chair legs or even electrical cords from being chewed on. Would you leave an infant child to wander around a house unsupervised? No of course not, that's dangerous. Well, the same thing applies to a puppy. Why would you inadvertantly endanger a puppy?
deanhills
Idoru wrote:
Nice to see so many replies Smile

This with crate-training is a new concept for me, and I have been doing some reading up. I must say, that I
can see some of the benefits, but that I don't agree with that harsh view on the dog. I think the same can
be accomplished, perhaps with more work and attention, the 'good old fashion way'. I'm am not a supporter
of the old methods of raising the puppy with yells and sticks, but neither of bringing treats and diversions
in to every encounter.

As for crate-training, I don't even think it's allowed here in Sweden, where I live. A new set of animal-right
laws where recentlly passed, focusing on dogs and cats situations. They regulate that you can't leave a dog alone for
longer periods of time, that they can't be confined for longer periods of time etc.

As for the keeping of a dog in his/hers own place, as <i>fx-trading-education</i> brought up, it's not an option.
The little pup who moved in with us is for the share joy of it. Wink Life is a good thing, better shared, and
shared with a dog is something special. Perhaps your philosophy is more for working dogs?

And <i>ese87</i>, I sure can grasp that. Very Happy Our little girl is almost to cute, but when it comes to biting (and some
other stuff), we are as firm as we would have been with a Rottweiler. It's just not ok.

Finally, Chad (<i>Wolf1918</i>), thx! Smile
She is becomming more and more certain of her place in the family. We go by some of the spirit Cesar spread,
and use his knowledge as inspiration. Cool
the Monks of New Skete I'll check up.


Am dying for some photos!!!!! Puppies like these must be the most adorable creatures in the world and just thrive on lots and lots of love and caring. Particularly small and intelligent little dogs like these. I would never be able to put it in a crate. If it is a puppy still it must be tiny, so probably would fit much better in a lid of a box, one where it can see over the top of the lid. Maybe it is even small enough for a shoe box, or a boot box. I would put a little blanket in it and make it real cozy, which would become its terrotorial blanket of course. As well as a small little clock. The tick tick of the clock has some restful effect on puppies like these, perhaps it sounds like the heart of its mom. Maybe add a little soft toy or two that it can nibble on, or a couple of socks in balls. And keep the box really close to warmth and this may sound crazy, but during the night I would keep it on my bed while it is so small. Your breathing may have a restful effect on it as well. Then of course the messy part of putting newspapers all over the floor, to try and get it to do its business in the right spots. Finally to get it to go outside. This part will not always be easy. It may take some specific persuasion like rubbing its nose in it business and talking loudly to it, then putting it outside (even if it breaks your heart). This is the only tough part I can think of that is really challenging, but with so many other compensations, you must already be completely in love with it. If I ever get out of the Middle East one day that will be my first acquisition, man's absolute best friend!

Does it look like this? Smile
Idoru
jwellsy wrote:
...
If you don't use a crate what do you do when company comes over that is all dressed up and doesn't want/need dog hair all over their fine clothes, or they are alergic to dogs or even afraid of dogs?
...
Most destructive behaviors by puppies is done while unattended/unsupervised. A crate can prevent pillows, coffee tables, chair legs or even electrical cords from being chewed on. Would you leave an infant child to wander around a house unsupervised? No of course not, that's dangerous. Well, the same thing applies to a puppy. Why would you inadvertantly endanger a puppy?


Well, the crate wont be something I'll use, even if, as I said, I can see some of the advantages with it.
As for company all dressed up, alergic, or afraid, they doesn't come here... We also live with six semi-longhair
cats, so hair on the clothes is kind of unavoidable. Laughing
As for unsupervised wandering the times that happen gets fewer and fewer. She's so affectionate that she wants
to be where we are, close and likes to fall asleep on our feet. The places in the house where she can't go have
either net or closed doors (like the steep stair, the guestroom, etc). So I guess, in a way, that some confinement
already is taking place Cool

deanhills, I hope you get to raise and live with one soon. Smile
But as for putting ones nose in ones buisness, I prefer more patiens and a tight schedual. Taking the puppy out
with tight interwalls and giving it creds when doing it right does the trick Very Happy
Pictures it was... :


deanhills
Idoru wrote:
deanhills, I hope you get to raise and live with one soon. Smile
But as for putting ones nose in ones buisness, I prefer more patiens and a tight schedual. Taking the puppy out


Thanks for the photos Idoru. How is the puppy getting on with the cats? Looks as though it is one of the family?

Think by the time I get a puppy, I will certainly ask you for some advice. I like your tip about the "nose in business", and am glad it is working out well. Smile
Idoru
Smile Thx Deanhills. Took that pic while she was really tired. lol
Na, not all of the cats are that happy we brought home a dog, but a couple of them even plays with her. Since
the body-languages are a bit different, and she has the intensity of a puppy, it can be some chasing and barking,
but we feel that it's working out great! Smile

Have been trying some light crate-training aswell. It began with protests of riding in the car. The only sollution
became a transporter. Loud protests the first few minutes, but then she accepted the situation and fell asleep.
Now we've used it a bit more, since it worked out so good, and if she doesn't choose to fall asleep at my feet or
her towel, she can be found in the transporter. So, to those that brought this to my attention - thx!
I would
never have thought of it otherwise. Would have felt it to be cruel.
deanhills
Idoru wrote:
So, to those that brought this to my attention - thx!
I would
never have thought of it otherwise. Would have felt it to be cruel.


I would have thought it cruel too, especially for such a small little dog. So have learned something too. Is it possible to take a photo of the transporter? Just want to get an idea of the size of it, as possibly it is not really that big a transporter?
raaeft1
Raising a puppy--especially a Labrador can be a difficult task indeed. One needs lots of patience to train a Labrador pup. Sometimes a Labrador is obstinate as a mule and it does not want to get `trained' at all.
la_Duchess
When housebreaking your new dog, the ideal situation would include having someone available all day, or at least someone available intermittently during the day, to take your puppy outside to eliminate so he quickly develops the habit of going outdoors. However, for many people this is not practical so other methods are required.

Housebreaking must begin as soon as you bring your new puppy home. This process may be frustrating for you but it is important to be patient and to do it correctly; if you are angry with your puppy because he is not learning quickly enough, you could cause him to fear you and make the housebreaking period even longer.

Puppies are not able to control themselves fully until they are about 12 weeks old, although when they are crate trained they can learn to control themselves for up to seven or eight hours by the time they are nine weeks old. They usually need to eliminate six times per day, especially after eating, sleeping, playing or exercising. It’s best to take him to the same place in your yard each time.

Establish a regular exercising routine and take your dog outside to eliminate immediately in the morning. Be sure to train your dog to eliminate at the beginning of the walk, otherwise he will learn to hold it to extend the walk.

For those who are unable to supervise a new dog all day, paper training can be used. The process will be longer than having someone available constantly but can still be done effectively.



Crate Training
Crate training is a very effective method of housebreaking your dog, although it can be more difficult if your puppy comes from a puppy mill or pet store where it is used to lying in its excrement. Dogs naturally want to keep their den area clean and will learn to hold their urge to eliminate when they are contained in their crate.

It is vital that you do not keep your dog cooped up day and night though; he still needs companionship and exercise and will develop health problems if he spends too much time in a crate. While a young pup can make it through a 7-8 hour night in the crate by about 8 weeks of age, they should not be crated for more than about 4 hours at a time during the day.

Allow enough room in a crate for your dog to stand up, stretch out and turn around. If the crate is too big it will be ineffective as your dog will be able to soil an area without having to lie in it. If you have a big dog and you purchase a crate that will house your puppy when it is full grown, you may need to block off a section at the back of the crate with a piece of cardboard or appropriate mesh until he grows into it.

Puppies will learn to like their crate but it will take some training to convince them that it is a good place to be. Make sure you do not send your dog to his crate as a punishment, or he will quickly learn to dislike it. Instead, begin by putting treats for your puppy in the crate and leaving the door open while he eats. Train your dog to obey a certain command for the crate by commanding it as you put treats in the crate.

At first, only leave your puppy in the crate for a few minutes with the door closed. Gradually increase the time he stays in, and walk away so he learns to stay there alone. Do not let him out if he starts barking or whining, but wait until he is quiet so you reinforce the good behaviour.

Crate training is an effective method of teaching your dog not to eliminate in the house but to wait until someone can take him outside.

If your dog does make a mess in the house, make sure you do not punish him unless you find him in the middle of the act. You will confuse him if you show him the mess even a few seconds later and scold him. He will understand that you do not like the mess, but will not understand that you do not want him to make the mess. You must patiently clean it up and use an odour neutralizer so that he does not return to that spot to eliminate again.

If you catch him in the act, say “No!” firmly and take him outside to finish his business. When he does so, praise him lavishly so he understands that this is what you want. It is also best to teach him a word associated with eliminating. Every time he does his business outside, say the word softly as you praise him. This will come in handy later in life when you want him to eliminate at a certain time.

Unneutered males have a tendency to mark (urinate) around the house so you should definitely have him neutered. Urinating is one of the ways he marks his territory and neutering will likely solve the problem. If house soiling is an ongoing problem in a previously housebroken pet, you should consult your vet to rule out any health problems.

Paper Training
Enclose off any area inside your house with room for your dog to play and sleep in one area, and room for him to eliminate in another. In the section where you want him to eliminate, put paper – newspapers work well – or puppy pads down. Make sure the enclosed area is safe for your puppy and be sure to provide appropriate, safe toys and chewies.

If he does not use the area you have papered you may have to start off by covering the whole section of his enclosure so he learns to do his business on paper. With time he should begin to go in one area of the enclosure, because dogs naturally like to have a sleeping area that is separate from their excrement. As he learns to do this, slowly decrease the amount of paper until you have one small area covered.

If your puppy does not use just the papered area, go back to papering the whole enclosure. As he learns to go on the paper, move this area around so he does not grow accustomed to eliminating in the same place, but always on the paper.

After several weeks – the time varies depending on the dog and the amount of time you are able to spend training him – you can put the paper outside and teach your dog only to go outdoors. As he reaches 12 weeks he should be able to hold it for at least eight hours.
kriszara
You have gotten a lot of good advice.
On the biting issue, when my female had her litters if the puppies go too rough she would growl or snap at them as a warning. If they didn't take the warning she would grab the pup by the head and pin it to the ground until it quits trying to bite. This works well for humans as well, a sharp "No" when the pup bites and pulling away will let it know that it bit too hard. Then you can offer a chew toy instead.
Enjoy your Puppy!
fx-trading-education
raaeft1 wrote:
Raising a puppy--especially a Labrador can be a difficult task indeed. One needs lots of patience to train a Labrador pup. Sometimes a Labrador is obstinate as a mule and it does not want to get `trained' at all.


I thought that Labrador was one of the race that was not too hard to train as Labradors are quite often used as guides for blind people (I think because they are pretty calm) and also for other things like drug detection (they are chosen there because they can smell very well). So it looked to me that Labradors can be very well trained.
Related topics
Which Linux distribution is the best?
funny pics
Don’t Shoot the Puppy
Puppy Invaders
Mother Cat Adopts Newborn Rottweiler
Getting a great dane
My trouble with Ubuntu
usando puppy linux para entrar a internet.
How to train a dog?
Puppy Pictures
Some Blonde Jokes
Lab Puppy!
Puppy Vs. Kitten
Training a dog (specifically a Lab)
Reply to topic    Frihost Forum Index -> Lifestyle and News -> Hobbies and Animals

FRIHOST HOME | FAQ | TOS | ABOUT US | CONTACT US | SITE MAP
© 2005-2011 Frihost, forums powered by phpBB.