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About linux and wine





metalfreek
Hello everyone, I am a big Ubuntu fan. Which one of its version is good. Also does wine support the driver made for XP?
SamiTheBerber
metalfreek wrote:
Hello everyone, I am a big Ubuntu fan. Which one of its version is good. Also does wine support the driver made for XP?

Latest one is the newest one. Also if you want stable and long supported system, you should consider latest LTS version.

Device drivers through wine?! You will have devices supported native by linux or with some other method. Wine is only for softwares and it also contains hardware emulation.
ocalhoun
To get good emulation in linux, try crossover office (commercial software that actually makes wine work properly) or get VMware server version (free virtual computer software that will run nicely on linux, including your version).

And, the last time I checked, wine works at the most, compatibly with windows 98 software.
Tuvitor
I've managed to get a lot of stuff to work in Wine that I was told you'd need CO or Cedega for. Just takes a little work in configuring stuff. As for device drivers, that would be a no-go because of the way Linux device drivers work. Generally speaking, device drivers in Linux are modules that are dynamically loaded into kernel space. There are some usermode drivers that are being worked on (or so I've heard) but actually using Windows drivers... there would have to be some sort of module wrapper for the Windows drivers (I would guess) to translate it to the way Linux does things. Wine is an API implementation, not a full OS implementation.

The good news is that you can find Linux drivers for damn near anything nowadays. Google is your friend. Cool
Fire Boar
Drivers pretty much "just work", especially with Ubuntu. If it's a wireless driver, you might need ndiswrapper to use the Windows XP driver if there's no kernel module for Linux. If it's a graphics card, there are packages you can install (like nvidia-glx) but if you're comfortable with CLI-tapping I'd recommend getting a newer version from the manufacturer's website. For example, nvidia-glx in Intrepid Ibex is version 177, but its support for KDE 4 is terrible. Installing NVidia 180 from NVidia's website made an enormous difference, almost like switching from no graphics driver to working graphics driver.

Weird devices vary: Synaptics touchpad is fully supported but only configurable within XOrg.conf, so it might be a bit perplexing if you don't know where to look, but a Google search turns up a lot of useful guides on configuring. Fingerprint scanners vary: some are supported, some aren't. I tend to just not bother. Webcams have a tendency to work out of the box in my experience, but you might need to install some package or other first. External display (additional monitors, projectors and so on) need configuring - if you use an NVidia graphics card then nvidia-settings does a great job configuring extra displays (make sure you run it as root though). This package is installed along with the driver if you got the latest version from the NVidia website, or can be installed separately if you got the package from your package manager. You'll have to restart X before the changes show up though (Ctrl+Alt+Backspace, or just log out).

Things like additional laptop buttons vary from model to model. Generally if something's going to work, it works out of the box, but it's usually possible to configure everything to do something.

Also, on the subject of Wine: I'd strongly recommend using the development version of Wine (currently 1.1.x) instead of the stable version (1.0.x) because there are a huge number of fixes and enhancements not in stable.
coreymanshack
I used to use Ubuntu, but I got tired of not being able to run lots of modern games and a few apps that I enjoy using.

I have not seen an emulator that will run 3-D effects good at all. If I found one, I would probably switch back to linux.

I had a dual boot running at one time, but that just became a hastle. Why not just boot into Windows when I can do everything there instead of booting to Ubuntu to program, then Windows to game.
metalfreek
I want to use a wireless Internet device in Ubuntu. But the driver for this device is only for windows. I checked the site of the device but I couldnt find the driver for linux. So, I was just thinking if I could use wine as a method for using the driver made for windows. I find surfing the internet much faster in Linux than in windows. And also there is no risk of Virus from internet if I use Linux.
coreymanshack
Wine is an emulator, it doesn't include drivers for hardware.
Fire Boar
metalfreek wrote:
I want to use a wireless Internet device in Ubuntu. But the driver for this device is only for windows. I checked the site of the device but I couldnt find the driver for linux. So, I was just thinking if I could use wine as a method for using the driver made for windows. I find surfing the internet much faster in Linux than in windows. And also there is no risk of Virus from internet if I use Linux.


Wireless internet drivers, as I mentioned above, need ndiswrapper if you're not going to use the Linux version (for whatever reason, it not existing being a perfectly good reason). Look up some ndiswrapper tutorial for your specific wireless card model. Actually, I think ubuntu 8.10 and above have a GUI for installing Windows wireless drivers.
ocalhoun
metalfreek wrote:
I want to use a wireless Internet device in Ubuntu. But the driver for this device is only for windows. I checked the site of the device but I couldnt find the driver for linux. So, I was just thinking if I could use wine as a method for using the driver made for windows. I find surfing the internet much faster in Linux than in windows. And also there is no risk of Virus from internet if I use Linux.

VMware to the rescue!
Install the free VMware server version in Ubuntu. (I've done that before and it will work, but you'll need to make a root account and use the command line utility to set up VMware.)
Install windows on a virtual PC within VMware. (The oldest version that supports your device would use the fewest system resources.)
Install 'VMware tools' on the virtual PC (just makes it work much better)
The crucial step: In the virtual PC hardware configuration, add a USB port. Tell it to give the virtual PC direct access to the physical USB port on the host (ubuntu) machine, rather than creating a virtual USB port, which is the default, I think. I know this can be made to work this way: I've connected USB flash drives this way before.
Plug the wireless internet device into that USB port, and isntall the software for it on the virtual PC.
Make a virtual network between ubuntu and the virtual PC installation of windows.
Make windows share the internet connection with ubuntu.
Fire Boar
... what? Shocked

Is there any reason why this would be a better solution than ndiswrapper? Come on, seriously. Having a Windows operating system running in the background routing a connection back to Linux is efficient how?
coreymanshack
Fire Boar wrote:
... what? Shocked

Is there any reason why this would be a better solution than ndiswrapper? Come on, seriously. Having a Windows operating system running in the background routing a connection back to Linux is efficient how?


No it's not, but it could be easier for some people.
Fire Boar
coreymanshack wrote:
Fire Boar wrote:
... what? Shocked

Is there any reason why this would be a better solution than ndiswrapper? Come on, seriously. Having a Windows operating system running in the background routing a connection back to Linux is efficient how?


No it's not, but it could be easier for some people.


... you sure 'bout that bud? You'd have to be totally allergic to the command line to choose a dodgy setup like that over ndiswrapper. Even then - the command line isn't a must - there are GUI apps out there that GUIfy the process.
coreymanshack
Fire Boar wrote:
coreymanshack wrote:
Fire Boar wrote:
... what? Shocked

Is there any reason why this would be a better solution than ndiswrapper? Come on, seriously. Having a Windows operating system running in the background routing a connection back to Linux is efficient how?


No it's not, but it could be easier for some people.


... you sure 'bout that bud? You'd have to be totally allergic to the command line to choose a dodgy setup like that over ndiswrapper. Even then - the command line isn't a must - there are GUI apps out there that GUIfy the process.


Oh well if there is a GUI app out there that would be easy too.
Fire Boar
Quite.

http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=ndisgtk

Search for ndisgtk on synaptic or use

Code:
sudo apt-get install ndisgtk


Intrepid and higher have it pre-installed. Might even be in Hardy too - not sure.
ocalhoun
Fire Boar wrote:
... what? Shocked

Is there any reason why this would be a better solution than ndiswrapper? Come on, seriously. Having a Windows operating system running in the background routing a connection back to Linux is efficient how?

Its not efficient at all, but I'm sure it would work, while I've tried ndiswrapper before and couldn't get it to work.
Agent ME
Wine lets user mode applications work on Linux, and often does this very well. Things like drivers don't work through wine and have to be set up through ndiswrapper.
My friend who had no linux experience, and windows experience consisting of playing games and dabbling in Visual Studio was able to follow a generic tutorial about ndiswrapper to set up his wireless card using the windows drivers on his new Ubuntu installation. (While I was trying to get the stupid defective linux drivers for the card to compile, amusingly. The windows drivers worked better than the company's linux drivers :/ )
Fire Boar
Agent ME wrote:
The windows drivers worked better than the company's linux drivers :/


That does sometimes happen - it's really just laziness. They don't open their specifications making it hard for the open source community to make their driver compatible, instead churning out a half-arsed "Linux version" when they really have very little idea how to code in Linux. It might even be just a wrapper around the Windows driver but not as good as ndiswrapper. We don't know, because they're kept closed source.
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