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Linux text editors





snowboardalliance
In my CSE course we are learning linux and we are supposed to use emacs or vim for programming. It's a c++ intro class, very easy but I guess I'll use it to learn different editors. Anyway, what is the advantage of something like emacs or vim over and IDE like Code::Blocks? I've used Code::Blocks for a while now but I'm starting to get used to emacs.
ocalhoun
Those are old news too...
I suspect they won't let you use it for the class, but try Anjuta in your own time.
leontius
emacs and vim are the ultimate classical editors in unix/unix-like environments - I think every expert from the generation before us (who usually becomes our teachers/professors) use at least one of them. But I don't think the current generation use it any more. We are content with the more modern editors such as Code::Blocks you have mentioned.
AftershockVibe
Just use eclipse, you'll love it. There's a C++ version.

Other than that I think the point of your course might not be to just code, but to understand how the compiler, debugger and all the other auxilliary programs fit together before ending up with a running executable.
funky_programmer
I wish that there's programs like Notepad++ or Programmer's Notepad in Linux. They are very useful for me in Windows environment, because Notepad++ can handle many programming language syntax. Maybe someone would compile its source code for Linux?

Programmer's Notepad is designed specially to handle C/C++ language, so it's very useful if you do your programming in C. FYI, it is included in WinAVR (a GCC for AVR microcontrollers).

Anyway, in Linux environment, I usually use gedit for general purpose text editing, because it is in GUI and very user friendly. I can do commands like "sudo gedit" if I want to get elevated privileges for editing system's settings, such as web server configuration, boot configuration, etc.
AftershockVibe
I've not used Programmers Notepad but Kate (And to a lesser extent GEdit) are pretty much equivalent to Notepad++ on windows.
Agent ME
For a text-based editor, nano seems to be the best simple and easy to use one I've tried.
For a graphical editor, I mainly use gedit. At gedit's website there are also some extra plug-ins you can download and use. I definitely recommend the Regex search-and-replace plug-in if you're any good at regular expressions, and the External Commands plug-in to be able to run the document through certain programs from a menu push.
snowboardalliance
ocalhoun wrote:
Those are old news too...
I suspect they won't let you use it for the class, but try Anjuta in your own time.


That really does look interesting. Yeah in class some people have asked about using other IDE's and they just say things like "Don't use Windows" (because of the different line endings it sounded like) and "it's not as portable to use something like codeblocks". They assume that no one uses Linux and we can only connect over ssh so emacs and vim are good because they work over the terminal.

leontius wrote:
emacs and vim are the ultimate classical editors in unix/unix-like environments - I think every expert from the generation before us (who usually becomes our teachers/professors) use at least one of them. But I don't think the current generation use it any more. We are content with the more modern editors such as Code::Blocks you have mentioned.

Yeah, my professor uses vim and my TA uses emacs and like no one else in the class has ever used either. Although a guy on my floor uses emacs and Ubuntu exclusively.

AftershockVibe wrote:
Other than that I think the point of your course might not be to just code, but to understand how the compiler, debugger and all the other auxilliary programs fit together before ending up with a running executable.


Yeah we are starting with simple "g++ file.cpp" and I think we'll start using makefiles soon. I was just glad when I found out we wouldn't be using like Visual C++.


Well, after writing some programs in emacs, I do like it in some ways. I mean the keyboard shortcuts can be fast. But then again in something with more of a GUI, I feel more productive. Still I think I'll use emacs for the class just to try something new since the programming in the class is very basic.
froginabox
I'm a big vim fan... really easy to pick up. My professors keep telling me to learn emacs, and maybe one of these days I will.

There is however one thing that started me on vim and I will link you to it here - the vi/vim cheatsheet! This was my desktop background for a long time, so I could just glance at it and get the shortcuts while I was working Wink

http://blog.ngedit.com/vi-vim-cheat-sheet-sch.gif

Hope that is useful! I know it worked wonders for me.
albuferque
Just one word: gedit
Studio Madcrow
I like Kate, the KDE editor. It has tons of great features and it works with my favorite desktop (I've gone back to KDE)
Kelcey
The only two editors I've ever used in Linux were vim and Kate. One of my lecturers said slickedit is really nice.
babygeek
like emacs, nano, vim. emacs is my fav.
sourojit
i use GNU emacs..never liked anything over it..
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