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India





internetjobs
any body went to visit india..

its really funny.. u will find more than 20 languages over there.. dont forget to read about political evaluation of country. If you visit US, Japan, china, or any other country u will find the same people all over the country. but in india every state is like different country, different languages, different culture.. everything is different.. not the city. city will be having all the people from all the states..
ocalhoun
internetjobs wrote:
If you visit US, Japan, china, or any other country u will find the same people all over the country.

A little bit of an exaggeration there...
I'll take the US as an example since I'm most familiar with it, but you can definitely tell the difference between Northern/Southern, Eastern/Western, city/country people, not to mention the variety of ethnic groups that retain various degrees of distinctness. It is also possible to tell the difference even between people from the same region, for example it isn't difficult to tell the difference between a Georgian and a Mississippian or the difference between a person from Maine vs a person from Boston.
There may be less variety, especially linguistically, but there is still variety.
Afaceinthematrix
^^ You don't even have to change states in some areas of the US. Hell, you don't even always have to change cities to be able to tell differences between certain people. Any city that has a nice, upper-class neighborhood along with the "ghetto," will display a decent amount of diversity in the way people talk, dress, their recreational activities, etc. This is especially true for some of the larger cities/counties. Take L.A., for example. You will see a lot of difference between the few non-tourists that are in Hollywood or Beverly Hills than the people that live in places like Compton, or even a decent middle class neighborhood. Actually, I should just take Hollywood out of that equation because I've straight up seen some unusual people there that can't really be compared well to other people... but you get the point...


internetjobs: Ocalhoun has a point. While the difference isn't as significant in the U.S., there is a difference. There's a slight accent (people in California, for instance, like to make fun of people who come from "back East" or the "mid-west"). There's also a difference in slang. That is probably the biggest difference. Lifestyle is also a difference. For instance, most adults in Southern California own a car. Most people in New York City do not own a car. They use a lot of public transportation, where as in SoCal (Southern California), public transportation is somewhere between poor and nonexistent.
deanhills
internetjobs wrote:
any body went to visit india..

its really funny.. u will find more than 20 languages over there.. dont forget to read about political evaluation of country. If you visit US, Japan, china, or any other country u will find the same people all over the country. but in india every state is like different country, different languages, different culture.. everything is different.. not the city. city will be having all the people from all the states..


Think I understand what you mean. I have not been to India, but I have met quite a number of Indians, and the differences between South and North are much more pronounced than South and North in any other country, including the United States. Remember though that the United States are really vast, even within a State or city (as has already been mentioned), people are different. But yes, there is at least one common language that everyone is aspiring too. In India, people sometimes have difficulty dealing with all the different languages.
airh3ad
I want to work this place india hope somebody can invite me here work.
kalliewalker
Is it safe for a woman in her 20s to travel alone in India? Or is it too risky.... I've admired India ever since I was little, love all of the colors, traditions, spices, henna, everything. I've always wanted to go.
ravikanth
Hello Kalle,
I am from India. I am doing my engineering in IIT Madras (its a technological institute), in chennai. I am from the Southern part of India. It is safe for women to travel in India in some places. Where do you want to go ? I can help if you can tell about your places of interest.
If you know English you can manage in most of the cities. There are too many languages in India! An average Indian know atleast 3 languages Smile
Ravikanth
ambily
Hi Kalle,

I live in India and has stayed for some time in Switzerland and Belgium and hence possibly can understand you,

Visiting alone to India for the first time may not be safe. Reasons,

1) India is not yet as organized as developed countries. You will need local help for commuting , visting places, food etc.

2) Some of the places of interest do have people who try to take benefit out of the lack of knowledge you have about the Indian system.

Having said the above, India is a country which could change your perception about life. I have seen the shock(literally) in face of some of my friends 2 minutes out of the airport.

Best is to,

1) Travel with a group when you are first time.

2) Take help from some friend who has already visited India or is an Indian.


Have a nice and safe trip.

Ambily.
deanhills
internetjobs wrote:
any body went to visit india..

its really funny.. u will find more than 20 languages over there.. dont forget to read about political evaluation of country. If you visit US, Japan, china, or any other country u will find the same people all over the country. but in india every state is like different country, different languages, different culture.. everything is different.. not the city. city will be having all the people from all the states..
Ocalhoun is right. I also think this is the same all over the world. There are real differences in people from one portion of a city to another. Germans for example are completely different in its Northern parts than its Southern parts, even in using different dialects. Same in Switzerland when you go from German to French parts of Switzerland. In the UK you find different English from Southern to Northern England, even more different in Wales, very different in Scotland and Ireland.
wanton
maybe what internetjobs really want to say is in india you can find people from any different places in the world. just like when you came to a disneyland Razz. but it's true, since they had one of the earliest civilization and near the silk road so indians consist of native indian, caucasian, persian, mongol, chinese, arab, africa...

actually, i really want to visit the taj Smile
vineeth
Traveling to India alone is not really safe, except for well identified tourism destinations. This applies to both sexes and all age groups. It is advisable to look for a travel agent who can offer you an escorted tour in India where one authorized Indian guide will assist you all the time. In this situation, it is safe.

It is also advised not to go to remote villages and outskirts of cities and towns alone as you may be a victim of frauds and thieves.

Care should be taken while visiting religious destinations of all communities, especially your dress code, behavior, use of cameras and other recording equipments etc. In many Hindu temples, non-Hindus are not allowed to enter, especially in south India. Photography and videography is banned in most of the temple areas.

Police may not be able to help you much as most of them may not be able to understand your language. If needed, always try to meet higher officers like Circle Inspector, Deputy Supd. of Police, Supd. of Police, Commissioner etc as they can help you better. If you are in Kerala, this rule does not apply as most of the cops are well educated and will be happy to help you.

Then, read books written specifically on Indian travel for foreigners and follow them. You will be safe.
supernova1987a
internetjobs wrote:
any body went to visit india..

its really funny.. u will find more than 20 languages over there.. dont forget to read about political evaluation of country. If you visit US, Japan, china, or any other country u will find the same people all over the country. but in india every state is like different country, different languages, different culture.. everything is different.. not the city. city will be having all the people from all the states..


yea, its not just more than 20 its more than 200, and counting all the dialects it becomes more than 1000. and its not because ppl migrated from over 200 countries or 200 planets, but all of the languages are native to the country. well, if they migrated from some other planets elsewhere in the galaxy i dont know, lol.
i am not from india, but very close to it. and i can tell its not 'really just funny', its mind boggling! what on earth is this place? center of the universe? wow!
Crorepati
Most of the problems cited in the post under this topic are rooted because India is a true democratic and free country and its judiciary is very kind to poor. At the same time this is very complex and debatable issue. Of late under pretext of globalization both executive and judiciary have stopped to go so strong on fundamental rights and encroachers and trouble mongers, rules flouters have been denied protection and cities are developing better and healthier.
Some body ha rightly said that we feel every Chinese or foreigner and their language one, because we do not know fully about their races or differences bases on geographic location and their dialects and languages.
What I feel most of the problems tourist face are because they wish to enjoy the shoestring budgets India offers because the price structure is adjusted to accommodate the poor in India, what they forget that such services, places and people come with a risk factor built in for several reasons. They should look for the people matching their status and how they are moving around, what standard of hotels they are staying, what kind of services people they are hiring and the risk factor ranges zero to highest. That is why five star hotels with tariffs $100 to $1000 are fully booked and there are hotels where you can get accommodation and good service for $10 also. And the visitors with females are always advised to keep the safety and risk factor top priority because all the locals do like that, move in AC class in train, move escorted etc.
deanhills
Crorepati wrote:
What I feel most of the problems tourist face are because they wish to enjoy the shoestring budgets India offers because the price structure is adjusted to accommodate the poor in India, what they forget that such services, places and people come with a risk factor built in for several reasons. They should look for the people matching their status and how they are moving around, what standard of hotels they are staying, what kind of services people they are hiring and the risk factor ranges zero to highest. That is why five star hotels with tariffs $100 to $1000 are fully booked and there are hotels where you can get accommodation and good service for $10 also. And the visitors with females are always advised to keep the safety and risk factor top priority because all the locals do like that, move in AC class in train, move escorted etc.
Hmmmm ..... I was totally unaware of one price structure for locals and a different one for tourists, but it probably does make sense as India is not unique in this. To be truthful, this has put me off, as obviously when you arrive at less than international hotels you will be at risk from many points of view. 100dollars is far overpriced. I'd rather visit Thailand for a better deal and more certainty of what to expect.
atul2242
India is not safe for single women who travel alone, news supports this.
While this may be generally true, i can tell of two women who have traveled extensively in India and alone. One I am meeting today in the evening, she is in her 20's and on her second visit to India. and traveling alone all over the north, including Kashmir, crossing into Pakistan.... she has learn English quite well now but in her first visit hardly knew any other language than Japanese.
The other is now quite senior, presently living in India for 20 years, she also traveled extensively, alone, without any major problems. Always used 2nd class railway and public transport, stayed in villages and ashrams. She is also Japanese and learnt Hindi while in India.

Let us not forget we have an ancient culture of respecting travelers and foreigners, commonly known as "atithi sammaan".
Chinmoy
india, is a good place to visit if you are intersted in history. Else, you get very few things of interest here , very few unique things except the sunderbans, the temples, the waterways of kerela, etc..
Betboy
a long history country,India China ```and any other country ,the make a great promotion to the world,In my opinion ,it's a good place to travel.if I have a chance ,I should go``
fantoos
According to its differences in culture, language, food, clothes, religion, beliefs etc. India is the only country in the world who have holding unity like this.
chatrack
India has a rich culture. You see Unity in diversity in India. there are different kinds of people
speaking different language having different cast and religion, Different in their dressing...
But you see they are under the same culture and unity of India - Bharat.
jeffryjon
I've travelled much in India over the last 14 years and stayed there most of the time for the last 3. Obviously being a man makes things a little different to being a woman, though let's state a few of the general truths.

Dual pricing isn't necessarily just for foreigners as people from other cities within India often suffer the same problem. There are usually ways around it. 1st make a game of hanging back before buying. Wait a couple of minutes and let a local buy the same thing you're interested in and then after they've moved away from the store ask them what they paid. (They usually won't tell anything in front of the shopkeeper). This has saved me between 10 and 90% on the price I'm originally asked by a shopkeeper. Keep in mind though that some things are fixed price without anyone stating as such and other shops claiming fixed price will sometimes give a discount.

Strangers chasing you to sell something is common in India. It could be anything from a train ticket, a hotel or a tourist trip, to someone trying to get you to visit their 'whatever'. Best response tried and tested is firstly to know that a tout is invariably overpricing, secondly to make no eye contact and thirdly not to respond verbally (even a firm 'no' will encourage more harrassment)

Safety is about being streetwise. Best understanding is to stick to the same rules you would at home. If a stranger goes out of his (or sometimes her) way to make an instant friendship, they usually have an agenda that works in their favour and the common perception unfortunately is that all westerners are free and easy with their sexuality. Don't take food or drink from strangers as it can sometimes be laced. This is a well known trick on trains for example. Having said that - on long distance journeys, once the ticket inspector has been, you'll be pretty sure of who is travlling how far and can quickly find a real friendship lasting the length of the train journey (usually with the normal exchange of emails etc from which you never hear of most people again - don't take it personal - it's the norm in India) Train journeys can be 2 or more days long and most people are just passing the time.

Getting robbed is far less common than people fear though it does happen so be streetwise - but 'daylight robbery' in the form of prices is not uncommon at all. know what you want - know the price - stick to it. I've spent a total of over 6 years of my life here and against popular belief, there is NO need to barter. There is sometimes however a need to gain your price discretely - any other tourists around and forget the cheap price.

Women in particular sometimes get problems in India because of their over-friendly nature. Indian men rarely get a chance to 'sow their oats' outside of marriage and if the opportunity arises (even in their mind) they'll stop at little to persuade someone. On the other hand, you will find men who are VERY respectable in every sense. In tourist areas in particular men will also try the girlfriend gets me a visa attitude and will in some cases marry just to get one. Shopkeepers also from certain regions have spread all over India and often left their wife at home and they are somewha famous for wooing the ladies. If you're invited to a single man's home it's usually because he want what's in your jeans - iether money or otherwise. I've seen many cases that have ended in tears. The same applies as it does at home - be sure you know someone before jumping in at the deep end.

Having given the terrible stories first, India is great and that's why I've spent so much time here. There are drawbacks that even a local won't deny but as long as you get clued-up and stay sensible you can have a fantastic time and as long as you speak English, there are only a few areas where you can't get by. Travelling with someone who knows the ropes can be a benefit the fiirst time though.
deanhills
@jeffryjon. Thanks for the excellent posting. I'm curious, which parts of India have you travelled, and which cities made a lasting impression on you?
jeffryjon
Quote:
I'm curious, which parts of India have you travelled, and which cities made a lasting impression on you?


The list is extensive but by no means complete. I've travelled to Dharamsala and McCloud gang (the home of the Delai Lama), Kashmir, Rishikesh, Varanasi, Darjeeling, Assam, Calcutta, Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Chennai, Goa, Kerala, Tamil Nadu, - it's a long list so I won't bore you too much. Lasting impressions may be more important.

Kerala - soft, mostly gentle and beautiful scenery - a very relaxing place on the whole but the humidity can get too much in the coastal areas.

Kanya Kumari - the southern tip of India was interesting but wouldn't want to stay there a long time.

The big cities are just that. Big - developing and usually in a big rush. A few tourist attractions are there but that's as far as it goes for me.

I could go into each and every place, but India is about experiences. Things happen and it really helps you find out what you're about. There's very little control here even though the laws are much the same as in India. I remember vividly an incident that happened the first time I arrived when walking past an almost unnoticeable temple. I was called inside by the priest and having nothing better to do thought I'd give it a few minutes. Already knowing from experience that these things often lead to attempts to coax the money out of your pocket, I'd already planned my escape strategy. The guy ONLY wanted to give me prasad (blessed food). It provoked a minute's thought about challenging my over-sceptical tendencies. Only a couple of minutes later, I was approached by a guy on the street and due to the earlier incident, I decided to give him the benefit of the dooubt. Turns out he was a pimp and worse that that was offering very young girls - scepticism restored.

It's these kinds of things (usually less extreme) that make India the place to find yourself. Everything's on offer and you have to decide what to take and what to refuse. I know we could say that this is true anywhere but in India everything is 'in your face' so to speak. India makes or breaks people because of this. There are psuedo god people, gurus and self-declared wise me everywhere - and occasionally you meet one who is for real, though you have to keep your wits about you because I've seen so many people sucked in by nonsense.
deanhills
I've been thinking about visiting Bangalore, but also Kerala, so may now change my priorities the other way round. Thanks for all the info.

Last night I was thinking about your posting when I saw a movie the "The Namesake". One of those movies that I did not expect to see and clicked on by accident, and then it really made an impression on me. Have you seen it? Gave me a complete different flavour of what India is about, amazing how one gets to search your roots more intensely when you are outside your country, than when you are inside your country. Almost as though one can only really connect with your roots, when you think they are missing:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Namesake_(film)
PS:You probably need to cut and paste this link, [url] tags don't seem to work with the (film) attached to the link and there is a different book by the same name as well.
jeffryjon
I've got one friend returning from Kerala in a couple of weeks and claims to have found a fantastic place about 60Km north of Kovalam. If you do go I'll get hold of the details. Another friend is travelling to Ooty in Tamil Nadu nearby and getting all sorts of Ayurvedic treatments for 700Rps (about 10 or $15US) per day all inclusive - sounds pretty good if you have the time.

The namesake sounds like one to watch. I'll keep it in mind for when I have time to kill. We had a few along the same theme in UK. I suppose wherever an Indian may travel these movies will have plenty to tell. Knowing a lot of Indian, Pakistani and Bangladeshi in England (all the same country until a few years ago), I can say that the movies we had in England portrayed a few truths in a rather humourous way.
deanhills
jeffryjon wrote:
I've got one friend returning from Kerala in a couple of weeks and claims to have found a fantastic place about 60Km north of Kovalam. If you do go I'll get hold of the details. Another friend is travelling to Ooty in Tamil Nadu nearby and getting all sorts of Ayurvedic treatments for 700Rps (about 10 or $15US) per day all inclusive - sounds pretty good if you have the time.
The Ooty treatments sound very attractive, would be great to get more information about those if available.

Agreed that "The Namesake" covers a typical theme. Not sure what it is but there was something "good" in the movie that went beyond the theme. Maybe it was the acting or characters or a combination of both.
pscompanies
jeffryjon wrote:
I've travelled much in India over the last 14 years and stayed there most of the time for the last 3. Obviously being a man makes things a little different to being a woman, though let's state a few of the general truths.

Dual pricing isn't necessarily just for foreigners as people from other cities within India often suffer the same problem. There are usually ways around it. 1st make a game of hanging back before buying. Wait a couple of minutes and let a local buy the same thing you're interested in and then after they've moved away from the store ask them what they paid. (They usually won't tell anything in front of the shopkeeper). This has saved me between 10 and 90% on the price I'm originally asked by a shopkeeper. Keep in mind though that some things are fixed price without anyone stating as such and other shops claiming fixed price will sometimes give a discount.

Strangers chasing you to sell something is common in India. It could be anything from a train ticket, a hotel or a tourist trip, to someone trying to get you to visit their 'whatever'. Best response tried and tested is firstly to know that a tout is invariably overpricing, secondly to make no eye contact and thirdly not to respond verbally (even a firm 'no' will encourage more harrassment)

Safety is about being streetwise. Best understanding is to stick to the same rules you would at home. If a stranger goes out of his (or sometimes her) way to make an instant friendship, they usually have an agenda that works in their favour and the common perception unfortunately is that all westerners are free and easy with their sexuality. Don't take food or drink from strangers as it can sometimes be laced. This is a well known trick on trains for example. Having said that - on long distance journeys, once the ticket inspector has been, you'll be pretty sure of who is travlling how far and can quickly find a real friendship lasting the length of the train journey (usually with the normal exchange of emails etc from which you never hear of most people again - don't take it personal - it's the norm in India) Train journeys can be 2 or more days long and most people are just passing the time.

Getting robbed is far less common than people fear though it does happen so be streetwise - but 'daylight robbery' in the form of prices is not uncommon at all. know what you want - know the price - stick to it. I've spent a total of over 6 years of my life here and against popular belief, there is NO need to barter. There is sometimes however a need to gain your price discretely - any other tourists around and forget the cheap price.

Women in particular sometimes get problems in India because of their over-friendly nature. Indian men rarely get a chance to 'sow their oats' outside of marriage and if the opportunity arises (even in their mind) they'll stop at little to persuade someone. On the other hand, you will find men who are VERY respectable in every sense. In tourist areas in particular men will also try the girlfriend gets me a visa attitude and will in some cases marry just to get one. Shopkeepers also from certain regions have spread all over India and often left their wife at home and they are somewha famous for wooing the ladies. If you're invited to a single man's home it's usually because he want what's in your jeans - iether money or otherwise. I've seen many cases that have ended in tears. The same applies as it does at home - be sure you know someone before jumping in at the deep end.

Having given the terrible stories first, India is great and that's why I've spent so much time here. There are drawbacks that even a local won't deny but as long as you get clued-up and stay sensible you can have a fantastic time and as long as you speak English, there are only a few areas where you can't get by. Travelling with someone who knows the ropes can be a benefit the fiirst time though.


Excellent post. This has absolutely everything that the OP asked. Also, highly factual and accurate (afaik lol).
sudipbanerjee
1st of all to everybody that India is the safest place for travel. Some bad thinks also happens here but this is not only the problem of India but also in almost all countries. Indian students are killed in Australia so can we think that Australia is not safe! Terroism is also a world wide problem. we have to fight against them unitedlly. Most of all India has a long back tradition. I just want to tell you to remember Sindhu & Harappa civilization. our relegion, our culture teaches us to help others around us. And you can find it all the remote places of India. So please don't misunderstood us by reading some incomplete news. Please contact anyone who has a long Idea about our Country. I think they will assure you about. If you have any query plese tell me, I will try to solve it. But please don't say that India not a safe place.
priyank
fantoos wrote:
According to its differences in culture, language, food, clothes, religion, beliefs etc. India is the only country in the world who have holding unity like this.



1000000+
india is uncompareable
jinz22
India is a country of poverty, dirtyness and few other negative factors but lets take out the negative facts and talk about real India
India is a county of religion and culture - there are many religion and cultures. It is a multicultural country.
India is a country with variety of food - you can get all kind of food with a very delicious taste and healthy for you.
India is a country of trends - many of you don't know that India actually invented a lot of different trends that was followed throughout the globe.
India is a country of freedom and unity - hindus, muslims, sikh or any other kind of race you're from. We think that everyone is of same RACE and that is humanity. Together we Unite

India is a GREAT COUNTRY and i am really proud of being INDIAN - Jai Hind
Abhishukla
i love travelling. i usually visit new places and the places are really beautiful.
rogue_skydragon
I would love to visit India one day. It's an extremely diverse culture which tends to be underrated amongst most other "western" societies. Perhaps the prime reason I'd like to visit is BOLLYWOOD...which is known to produce the most movies in the entire world per year. Being in the film industry myself, it's quite an attractive market.
jeffryjon
Yes the film industry is a booming one here. As well as Bollywood, many states have their own movie production companies - often a play on the word Bollywood / Hollywood. When they need Western faces for their actors, long-term tourists can often pick up work as extras - instant fame even if nobody knows who you are. (Some have found this a way to extend their trip when they run low on cash)
dengerojame
a beautiful country to travel to turkey
HenryDamiani
India is a beautiful country located in South Asia. It has many tourist attractions, Some are:
1. Taj Mahal
2. Goan beaches
3. Corbett National Park
4. Himalayas
5. Khajuraho Temples
6. Ganges River.
yagnyavalkya
India has a lot of places of interest
therimalaya
I'll visit there one day, I missed a opportunity one day due to my study and work, but i'm planning to visit there
ayour
i am from morocco and i realy like india and the people there are very nice i wish i could visit it in the future
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